Backcountry Forum
Backpacking & Hiking Gear

Backcountry Forum
Our long-time Sponsor - the leading source for ultralite/lightweight outdoor gear
 
 
 

Amazon.com
Backpacking Forums
BackcountryGear.com
backcountry gear

---- Our Gear Store ----
The Lightweight Gear Store
 
 WINTER CAMPING 

Shelters
Bivy Bags
Sleeping Bags
Sleeping Pads
Snow Sports
Winter Kitchen

 SNOWSPORTS 

Snowshoes
Avalanche Gear
Skins
Hats, Gloves, & Gaiters
Accessories

 ULTRA-LIGHT 

Ultralight Backpacks
Ultralight Bivy Sacks
Ultralight Shelters
Ultralight Tarps
Ultralight Tents
Ultralight Raingear
Ultralight Stoves & Cookware
Ultralight Down Sleeping Bags
Ultralight Synthetic Sleep Bags
Ultralight Apparel


the Titanium Page
WM Extremelite Sleeping Bags

 CAMPING & HIKING 

Backpacks
Tents
Sleeping Bags
Hydration
Kitchen
Accessories

 CLIMBING 

Ropes & Cordage
Protection & Hardware
Carabiners & Quickdraws
Climbing Packs & Bags
Big Wall
Rescue & Industrial

 MEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 WOMEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 FOOTWEAR 

Men's Footwear
Women's Footwear

 CLEARANCE 

Backpacks
Mens Apparel
Womens Apparel
Climbing
Footwear
Accessories

 BRANDS 

Black Diamond
Granite Gear
La Sportiva
Osprey
Smartwool

 WAYS TO SHOP 

Sale
Clearance
Top Brands
All Brands

 Backpacking Equipment 

Shelters
BackPacks
Sleeping Bags
Water Treatment
Kitchen
Hydration
Climbing


 Backcountry Gear Clearance

Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#176480 - 04/15/13 02:54 PM Need a backpack for wild camping
joshua3299 Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/15/13
Posts: 2
Hey all, I'm new to these forums and backpacking so sorry if I sound like a 'newbie'

I am looking for a backpack that I can use for wild camping. I want it to be light. I need to fit a tent, sleeping bag, 3 sets of clothes and enough food for 2 weeks (also other small things.

I will be using it in England (Lake district) and Scotland, hopefully.

I have looked at bags such a the 'Osprey' brand and 'North face' and from what I have read these two companies sell the best bags. I really want an up to date pack which is comforable as well as affordable so around 100 - 150 pounds (so i think 150 - 220 dollars?)

I could really use different opinions and talk to people who have tested other bags.


Thanks

Top
#176483 - 04/15/13 04:05 PM Re: Need a backpack for wild camping [Re: joshua3299]
billstephenson Offline
Moderator

Registered: 02/07/07
Posts: 3915
Loc: Ozark Mountains in SW Missouri
I use an Osprey bag and I like it, but you want to find a bag that fits all your gear and is comfortable.

The best way of figuring that out is to get all your gear and then bring it to a retailer and fill a bag and try it on.

The other way is to get a bag and stick your gear in it and go. Either way you get out there, so they're both good wink

_________________________
--

"You want to go where?"



Top
#176488 - 04/15/13 06:01 PM Re: Need a backpack for wild camping [Re: joshua3299]
GNPjason Offline
newbie

Registered: 01/25/13
Posts: 13
Loc: LV, NV
You will want to look at 80-90 L backpacks for what you want to do. I am personally biased toward mountain hardwear backpacks for backcountry camping but any brand name is usually a quality product these days.


Edited by GNPjason (04/15/13 06:26 PM)

Top
#176545 - 04/17/13 02:48 AM Re: Need a backpack for wild camping [Re: joshua3299]
TomD Offline
Moderator

Registered: 10/30/03
Posts: 4963
Loc: Marina del Rey,CA
A 90 L bag is huge and far bigger than what you likely need. I carried a 60L pack in NZ and it was fine for extended camping. Osprey and TNF are American brands. Nothing wrong with them, but I would look for something from the UK or the EU, like Deuter, Bergen or Jack Wolfskin for value for money. Have you looked at Cotswold's website? They have a lot of gear, including all of these brands. The big thing with a pack is fit. Not all packs fit the same regardless of size. I had a huge Arcteryx pack that never fit right, so got rid of it after one trip. An ill fitting pack will be miserable regardless of what you pay for it, just like boots or shoes.

Your tent can be tied to the outside of your pack. As far as clothes go, 3 sets could mean anything, so not sure what you are taking. Take a couple of sets of base layers and one set of outerwear and insulation. Go through your clothes and gear list first, then decide what pack to get to hold it all.

If you can, follow Bill's advice and go to a well stocked store with your stuff and see what fits. A really big pack is far too tempting to fill up with stuff you don't need, unless you are winter camping (as in snow on the ground winter) and the space is for lightweight insulated clothes like a big down parka (like in my photo).


Edited by TomD (04/17/13 02:50 AM)
_________________________
Don't get me started, you know how I get.

Top
#176555 - 04/17/13 03:40 PM Re: Need a backpack for wild camping [Re: TomD]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6518
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
I can't tell from your post if you are wilderness trekking (what this site is all about) or doing budget travel with occasional camping. If the latter, you might get better information from budget travel sites like Lonely Planet.

Just to add to the above advice, all excellent, except the 90L pack: I go out backpacking (wilderness trekking) for 7-9 days at a time with a 30L pack, total starting weight (including 9 days of food) of 24 lbs. (11 kg). I also have traveled in Europe for 3 months at a time with only 2 changes of clothing, which was plenty. Quick-dry fabrics are the answer. Packing light is more fun!

The three most important aspects of a backpack are fit, fit and fit. The pack must fit your gear, fit your body and be comfortable for you to carry with your gear inside. Backpack fit is as important as shoe fit!


Edited by OregonMouse (04/17/13 03:44 PM)
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

Top
#176556 - 04/17/13 03:42 PM Re: Need a backpack for wild camping [Re: TomD]
aimless Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 02/05/03
Posts: 2948
Loc: Portland, OR
The OP said he wants to carry two weeks worth of food at once. This can add up to a considerable bulk, depending on the food he chooses to take. It is also difficult from this distance to know how bulky his other gear is. So, it becomes equally hard to know whether he needs a 60L or 90L pack.

The advice to gather up his gear and food so he can put it into the pack he is considering buying is the best possible advice under the circumstances. He can do this at the store, or, if the store has a reasonable returns policy, he can bring the pack home and do his evaluation of fit, size and general acceptibilty there with less time pressure.

I never presume that my experience has any bearing on what someone else will want or need in the way of a pack. People differ too much in their build and their packing style to allow me to generalize from what I do to what they will be happy doing.

Top
#176619 - 04/19/13 10:21 PM Re: Need a backpack for wild camping [Re: joshua3299]
goldenteardr Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/18/13
Posts: 8
Loc: az and nm
I too are looking for information on new backpack and new equipment. I checked a few and it seemed that front loading may have an advantage as everything can be accessed. But these are difficult to find. I found an top load Osprey which may be OK for five days with about 60 liters and weight is a little above 2 kg.

Top
#178924 - 08/05/13 11:28 AM Re: Need a backpack for wild camping [Re: goldenteardr]
WDW4 Offline
member

Registered: 08/01/13
Posts: 18
Loc: Lexington, KY
For true backcountry travel of up to that length, I use a 50-60L backpack, with food taking up about half of the space. I use a cheap "HighGear" backpack for that application, which has flaws but gets the job done. If you will be around towns or can make short detours to where food is available, I recommend buying food every couple days, so that you can travel faster and carry a smaller pack (30-45L). I use a GoLite Jam for that application, which has served me well for six or so years, and is still going strong and very light (1lb 5oz)

Top
#201174 - 06/13/18 04:27 AM Re: Need a backpack for wild camping [Re: WDW4]
Prainz Offline
newbie

Registered: 06/13/18
Posts: 2
Loc: New Jersey
I apologize for bump an old topic from the dead, just have a few interesting observations from personal experience, maybe someone will need this information in the future.Some good feedback. The key, as already mentioned, is gather up all your gear (make sure you cover all the essentials); weight it and size it. Find a pack that has an adequate frame and suspension to comfortably handle both the weight and volume of your gear. For those just getting started, I highly recommend making your way to a competent outdoors store that will fit you properly for a pack. Pack fit is the most critical aspect. Once you find out how a pack is supposed to fit, you can shop around for deals on packs that have the right torso length with the features you know you need to ensure it not only fits but is comfortable.

Osprey packs are probably the most common I see on the trail and for good reason. They have some quality designs, good features, and solid suspension systems. I’ve used expensive packs (Kifaru, Mystery Ranch, Arc’Teryx) and more mainstream packs (Osprey, Gregory, etc.), and they all work well for specific needs. I would stick with backpacking designed packs, simply for the weight savings.

Volume is important. Too much and most packs won’t do well with smaller loads. Tool little and you end up having stuff hanging off the outside of your pack. Comfort ratings for maximum weight limits are your first concern, but volume is the second once you find out the most comfortable pack sized to fit you. As you upgrade gear, you’ll find you can get by with lighter and smaller volume pack.

My main three-season pack is a ULA Circuit. (Deleted link) It’s about as perfect a pack as I’ve found for my backpacking needs. I can keep full loads under 30 pounds…warmer months that can be as many as 7-days, or fewer days during winter months due to bulkier insulation needs. My base weight (minus food, fuel and water) is around 14 pounds, so the majority of my gear is pretty light and compact. If your gear is a little bulkier and heavier, I would recommend the Catalyst model which has more volume and can carry loads up to 40 pounds. I plan to pick up a Catalyst for winter loads or planned backpacking trips where you need a bear canister.There are a lot of useful and interesting videos on this topic on Youtube, I will leave one here, I hope someone will help in choosing the future. Good luck!
(Deleted link)


Edited by Glenn Roberts (06/13/18 06:21 AM)
Edit Reason: Remove commercial links (see forum policies)

Top
#201224 - 06/22/18 12:59 PM Re: Need a backpack for wild camping [Re: joshua3299]
Alf Offline
member

Registered: 04/15/18
Posts: 48
Loc: London, UK.
Originally Posted By joshua3299
Hey all, I'm new to these forums and backpacking so sorry if I sound like a 'newbie'

I am looking for a backpack that I can use for wild camping. I want it to be light. I need to fit a tent, sleeping bag, 3 sets of clothes and enough food for 2 weeks (also other small things.

I will be using it in England (Lake district) and Scotland, hopefully.

I have looked at bags such a the 'Osprey' brand and 'North face' and from what I have read these two companies sell the best bags. I really want an up to date pack which is comforable as well as affordable so around 100 - 150 pounds (so i think 150 - 220 dollars?)

I could really use different opinions and talk to people who have tested other bags.


Thanks


Just to add my own advice to that of those who have already responded...I cannot stress enough the importance of only carrying the bare minimum that you need to camp with, and only using the lightest camping kit available....if you can afford it.
I don't think carrying two weeks worth of food with you is a very good idea, firstly because just a weeks worth of food could easily weigh a couple of Kg's (4.4 lbs), and that is a lot of weight to carry when it comes to ultralight wild camping. So carefully consider the items of food you are prepared to carry.
Unless you are planning on staying in one spot for the entire two weeks (and risk being discovered by a disgruntled landowner!), it is very likely that you will come across somewhere to buy food at some point along the way, between various camping spots, and this will reduce the need to carry so much food with you...Of course, if you ration your food you can make it last much longer, so consider this too.
You can also reduce the need to carry so much food by learning which free wild foods are available in the area you are planning on camping in, and utilising them as wayside snacks to stave off feelings of hunger...This could easily make your weeks worth of food last more than two weeks. I don't mean hunting wild animals though...In the UK there are a lot of free edible plants, fruits and leaves and berries about in the countryside, depending on the season, if you know where to look and how to identify them.
Also, ditching heavy staple food items like Sugar, for much lighter and much more compact sweetener tablets, when you have a brew is a good way to reduce the weight and size of your food bag. By reducing the size and weight of all the camping items you carry, the smaller the backpack you will need...And this in turn reduces the trail weight of your backpack.
I get away with using a 100% waterproof, 35 litre backpack, that only weighs about 760g (A Mountain Hardware Scrambler RT35 Outdry). It has two concealed vertical daisy chains on the back which allows me to increase my pack capacity by attaching smaller additional packs externally to the back of it, as required, via some custom 10 or 15mm wide webbing straps, so you don't necessarily need to use a huge, heavy backpack that can carry everything internally.

Top
#201225 - 06/22/18 02:06 PM Re: Need a backpack for wild camping [Re: Alf]
wandering_daisy Offline
member

Registered: 01/11/06
Posts: 2796
Loc: California
Carrying two weeks food is NOT unreasonable. I have done so many times. The trade-off is extra weight for the freedom not to have to walk out (perhaps round trip of 30-40 miles in some western mountain ranges) to resupply. Of course, an alternative is to get food packed in by horse outfitters, but you are talking $400 range of prices.

All my longer trips were done with an external frame pack- they offer very flexible capacity and carry heavy weights better. I still use my old Kelty pack, with an extender bar, in these situations.

You still need to minimize gear and watch the weight of the food, and re-pack it to eliminate bulk and packaging materials. Try to keep the food weight under 2 pounds per person per day- quite easy to do. I can get 2,500 calories per day with 1.3 pounds of dry/FD food. If you are a good fisherman, you can cut this back to about 1 pound per day. So, an average number would be about 1.5 pounds per day x 14 days= 21 pounds food. If you keep your base weight to about 20 pounds (light but not UL), that is a starting pack weight of 41 pounds. Not unreasonable at all.

Be aware that there is a "sweet point" of optimum pack weight beyond which it will slow you down so much that you do not gain much for going out more days in one food ration. Everyone is different. My "sweet point" is 40 pounds- Although the first few days are slow, I can still cover a lot of ground as the pack weight goes down. Yours may be different. If you are big, young and strong and can carry 65 pounds without slowing down too much, that is OK too.

Now, if your base weight is more like 30 pounds and very bulky, going out for 2 weeks becomes quite difficult.

The current trend is to go "fast and light". Long distance backpackers (on trails) now go 20-25 miles a day and cover so much distance that they seldom carry more than 4-5 days food. This is how PCT and AT hikers do it between going into towns.

Personally, that is not my style. I like off-trail and going a slower.

At any rate, I doubt you need a 90L pack. Maybe replace a few very bulky items (such as sleeping bag and tent) with more compact and light versions. Then ruthlessly delete the unneeded.

Top
#201226 - 06/22/18 02:51 PM Re: Need a backpack for wild camping [Re: wandering_daisy]
aimless Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 02/05/03
Posts: 2948
Loc: Portland, OR
Be aware that there is a "sweet point" of optimum pack weight beyond which it will slow you down so much that you do not gain much for going out more days in one food ration.

Then again, sometimes the point is not to cover the maximum number of miles, but to remain in the backcountry the maximum number of days. This may include setting up a base camp, where the majority of the weight does not need to be moved to a new location every day.

Each kind of trip presents its own set of problems and optimum solutions. Most hikers quickly standardize one on methodology that best suits their personality and physical ability, but there are as many variations on backcountry travel as one's imagination allows, including frontpacks as well as backpacks, or using horses, mules, burros, llamas, and I've even seen packgoats! grin

Top

Shout Box

Highest Quality Lightweight Down Sleeping Bags
 
Western Mountaineering Sleeping Bags
 
Lite Gear Talk - Featured Topics
DWR and Trail Runners
by Bill Kennedy
07/01/18 03:19 AM
Montrail hiking shoe replacement???
by Keith
06/30/18 11:11 PM
Need a backpack for wild camping
by joshua3299
04/15/13 02:54 PM
Backcountry Discussion - Featured Topics
Leaving a Mark
by balzaccom
07/10/18 09:32 PM
Maximizers vs Sufficers in backpacking
by Pika
06/29/18 12:34 PM
Alice Pak
by Capt hook
06/21/18 01:13 PM
Make Your Own Gear - Featured Topics
drying socks while hiking
by AtlantaBill
06/28/18 03:28 PM
Quilt question
by PaHiker
06/28/18 12:14 PM
New Pack Finished
by Bill Kennedy
06/27/18 05:39 AM
Featured Photos
Breakneck Ridge, New York
May 2012 Eclipse, Lassen Park
New Years Eve 2011
Trip Report with Photos
Seven Devils, Idaho
Oat Hill Mine Trail 2012
Dark Canyon - Utah
Who's Online
0 registered (), 100 Guests and 0 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
CWalkerNC, Nadini, itsBella, AHeff, Sharbear
12600 Registered Users
Forum Links
Disclaimer
Policies
Site Links
Backpacking.net
Lightweight Gear Store
Backpacking Book Store
Lightweight Zone
Hiking Essentials

Our long-time Sponsor, BackcountryGear.com - The leading source for ultralite/lightweight outdoor gear:

Backcountry Forum
 
 

Since 1996 - the Original Backcountry Forum
Copyright © The Lightweight Backpacker & BackcountryForum