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#131165 - 03/24/10 04:56 AM Opinion's on my gear list
wesarnold Offline
member

Registered: 03/23/10
Posts: 45
Loc: Birmingham, AL
I'm new to backpacking, but very eager to get out there and truly disconnect from the repetitive insanity that is the rest of my life. Thus I've researched and researched and finally brought it down to this list of gear. Some stuff I've already got, some stuff I have yet to obtain - but none-the-less this list will be used as a check-list before my first over-nighter. There aren't specific brands or models of gear - although I've got that list too. The particular make and model of what gear one obtains seems to be so much more of a personal preference. I just wanted to post it up and let you guys take a gander and give any comments or suggestions.

My first trip I'm planning will be at Oak Mountain State Park in AL, as I'm from Birmingham.

Here it goes:

Backpacking Gear List
1. Backpack (w/ rain cover)
2. Tent
3. Sleeping Bag (w/ stuff sack)
4. Lights (headlamp, and handheld w/ extra batteries)
5. Stove and Utensils (spork, cup, bowl)
6. Water filtration/purification (filter and/or chemical)
7. Water bottle x2 (1L/ea.)
8. Knife and/or multi-tool
9. First Aid Kit and personal medications
10. Sun screen
11. Sun Glasses
12. Bug Spray
13. Blistex
14. GPS (and compass with paper topographic map)
15. Fire starter (waterproof matches, lighter)
16. Tent Repair Kit (dental floss with sewing needles)
17. Toilet paper and trowel
18. Duct Tape (can’t go anywhere without it)
19. Camera
20. Bear hanging/multi-use rope
21. Assorted Zip-lock freezer bags

22. Clothing (all 100% synthetic or wool and quick drying) (w/ stuffsack(s))
- Shirt
- Shorts
- Pants
- Hat
- Underwear x2 pair
- Socks x2 pair + liner socks
- Fleece jacket
- Fleece pants
- Rain jacket
- Long Johns
23. Hygiene
- Toothbrush and toothpaste
- Soap (biodegradable)
- Towel
24. Food
- High protein snacks (clifbar Roks)
- Oatmeal
- Gtrits
- Gorp
- Mac & cheese
- Ramon Noodles
- Chicken in a bag
- Beef Jerky
- Hot dogs
- Granola bars
- Trail bars
- Power bars
- Instant soup
- Cereal w/ powdered milk
- Tea/coffee bags
_________________________
adventureempires.blogspot.com

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#131170 - 03/24/10 07:21 AM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
Glenn Offline
member

Registered: 03/08/06
Posts: 2617
Loc: Ohio
Although it looks like you've got it pretty well covered, I'd make the following comments:

1. You only need 1 light - I'd choose the headlamp, because it can double as a handheld light and is a lot more convenient to use.

2. I don't see a sleeping pad listed; I'd suggest you at least bring a thin closed-cell foam pad for insulation, since the ground could still be cool.

3. I'm not going to go too deeply into your menu, but I'm wondering how you plan to cook all that stuff - you don't include a stove and pot on your list. (I know you can use a fire, and roast the hot dogs on a stick - but it's a bit hard to do the same with mac-n-cheese. grin ) I tend to avoid perishable foods like hot dogs, myself, but I know people who take them, so I won't quibble too much. If you're interested in simplifying trail life, you might want to move to a simpler menu, but there's nothing inherently wrong with what you list.

4. Once you add that pot, you might be able to eliminate the bowl (just eat from the pot) and, if you decide you can live with just water to drink, you can eliminate the cup, too.

5. As far as clothes, you have what looks like a good cold-weather list. You don't say what kind of hat; for cooler weather, a stocking cap would be a good thing, and perhaps a balaclava. For spring, I'd probably take either the longjohns or the fleece, depending on the forecast, but you may not need both. Also, I prefer shorts for hiking, and would probably not take the long pants. (I carry rain pants, which I notice are not on your list, and let them do double duty on the rare occasions I want long pants. In cooler weather, I wear my longjohn bottoms under my shorts instead of long pants. But that's strictly personal preference.)

Two liters of water capacity is a bit sketchier than I'd choose personally, but I don't know the area you'll be hiking in - you may never need to carry extra water between sources, or have to make a dry camp. I tend to carry only a liter between sources, so I usually bring a 1-liter bottle with a 2 or 3 quart reservoir (Dromlite, Nalgene Cantene, Platypus, or Camelbak) empty in pack. The collapsible reservoir doesn't take up much space in the pack, and 4 quarts is plenty to get me from the last source of the day to camp, cook supper and breakfast, and get me to the first source the next day. (The exact amount you'd need for overnight depends on what you're cooking and how messy it will be to clean up - I might pass on mac-n-cheese at a dry camp.)

Overall, it looks like you've done a pretty good job figuring out what you need. Now, if we can only trick you into talking about the weight of all this, you'll never get out because you'll be too busy reading all the replies!

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#131176 - 03/24/10 11:45 AM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
idahosteve Offline
member

Registered: 11/05/09
Posts: 62
Loc: Idaho
I think you are on the right track, but I think you also have a bit of overkill. But first, how many days will you be out? I thought that gear wise, your close, agreed, you don't need two lights, and you could scale back on both GPS, and compass, but depends on exactly where you are going.
Clothing IMHO is a monster list. You have a list of clothes for all 4 seasons, with changes as well. Many of your clothes do double duty. A good question to ask yourself is how many of these clothes can I wear all at the same time. Whatever is left, don't take. Rain gear doubles as wind gear, which doubles as a warmth layer etc. Wearing your long johns under rain gear is like haveing fleece on etc. Get rid of the clothes and you will be more flexible, and lighter.
Probably the best excersise will be after you get back home, take your gear and put it into two piles. One, gear you actually used/wore/needed, and two, gear you carried around and just repacked all trip long. Then make a serious decision on wether or not that gear should be going with you again.
With regards to first aid/navigation/filtration items & possibly tent & stove/cook kit, these are or could be shared gear, and within your group, should be singled out as to not bring doubles and triples to make it light and usable. on a weekend trip, do 3 of you really need to all bring multitools? Or 3 first aid kits? I like to be prepared, but the best tool is between your ears.
All of these comments should be taken with a grain of salt, as each trip, and each area has its own parameters, but really force yourself to be disciplined. Good luck!
_________________________
I dare you to move, like today never happened...
-Switchfoot-

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#131182 - 03/24/10 12:12 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
I would either bring the fleece pants and jacket or the long johns, not both. You are in Alabama, it isn't that cold.

If you are only going for one night, leave the toothbrush, toothpaste, soap and towel at home. In fact, bring a small baggie of baby wipes, and skip the toilet paper. Now you have soap and toilet paper laugh.

That is a lot of food for an overnight. Eat a big meal before you leave. Generally, I recommend no-cook foods for the first couple over-nighters. It simplifies life. You can then ditch the stove and pot and not worry about it. There are a lot of other things you can spend your time worrying about getting right before you need to master backpack cooking. I am not saying you have to, just recommending it.

In the end, don't stress it too much. Throw it all in your pack and go. Come back (with pictures) and ask what you could change, or what you didn't like.


Edited by finallyME (03/24/10 12:15 PM)
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#131186 - 03/24/10 01:15 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: idahosteve]
Glenn Offline
member

Registered: 03/08/06
Posts: 2617
Loc: Ohio
Good points. I agree with you in principle about sharing gear to cut weight, but I don't actually do it when I meet up with my buddy Mike.

We tend to take solo trips together, because we both like to play with our own toys. Also, it gives us the option of hiking together but camping separately (for example, I might want to be down by the stream, but he might want to head up to the ridge top because of the full moon.) Also, even though we've been doing this for close to 20 years together, I'm still not entirely convinced I can trust him to remember his half of the shared gear. (But then, I'm still not convinced my daughter and son-in-law can be trusted with small electrical appliances, let alone my grandkids. smile )

If you're going with a group, absolutely share gear. But, there's nothing inherently wrong with being self-sufficient inside the group, either. Again, it comes down to preference.

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#131206 - 03/24/10 05:32 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: Glenn]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6765
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
It's a bit hard to evaluate your list without knowing the weights of the individual items. You might want to consider investing in a digital postage scale. A spreadsheet with the weights has multiple uses, not only to see the effect on total pack weight but also as a checklist for each trip.

If you haven't already seen them, there are lots of useful articles on the home page of this site, in the left-hand column. The various gear lists are particularly helpful.


Edited by OregonMouse (03/24/10 05:34 PM)
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

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#131212 - 03/24/10 07:07 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
Tango61 Offline
member

Registered: 12/27/05
Posts: 931
Loc: East Texas Piney Woods
As the others have indicated, this is a good list of gear to start collecting.

You will be able to pick/choose what you take based on the weather and where you are going and for how long.

I very seldom take everything I have, but there is a set of items that I seem to always take. The next step is to look at those items I always take and see what I really use. And then, make a decision on what I may want to leave behind.

Tango61


Edited by Tango61 (03/24/10 07:08 PM)
_________________________
If you think you can, you can. If you think you can't, you can't. Either way, you're right.

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#131228 - 03/25/10 12:10 AM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
Trailrunner Offline
member

Registered: 01/05/02
Posts: 1835
Loc: Los Angeles
Just to be clear, what do you mean by an "over-nighter"? Just one night (as opposed to a day hike) or more? Your post can be interpreted either way. If it is one night, your clothing and food lists are way overkill. For more than one night, maybe not.

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, what works for me, for my particular style, may not work for you. I don't know what your priorities are, such as weight VS comfort. And as a newbie maybe even you don't know that yet. People will tell you to leave things at home and others will tell you to take things that are not on the list......because that's what works for THEM, maybe not YOU.

My best advice.......make your first trip a very short one-nighter. If you have doubts any one piece of gear, take it along. You will soon discover what you really need and what you really don't need.

You can read replies until you're blue in the face but there is no substitute for personal experience.

That being said, I see a few glaring omissions (IMO) in your list. As for what to leave off the list, that's where your personal experience and preferences will come in.

A bandana, the ultimate multi-tool. Everyone should have at least one.

A ground cloth for your tent. Again, that's just personal preference on my part. I don't mean a one pound factory tent footprint, just a light piece of painter's drop cloth or similar.

Since you are a newbie, some sort of blister treatment. Maybe the duct tape will work?

I only see one hat. Is it for sun protection, warmth at night, or both? No hat does everything. A warm hat at night does wonders if it's cold out.







_________________________
If you only travel on sunny days you will never reach your destination.*

* May not apply at certain latitudes in Canada and elsewhere.

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#131236 - 03/25/10 07:34 AM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
wesarnold Offline
member

Registered: 03/23/10
Posts: 45
Loc: Birmingham, AL
Thanks for all the replies!

I'd just like to clarify - the original purpose of this list wasn't for one single trip. Looking at my post - I see I didn't really say it that way...Either way - I've been camping a few times and loved it (car camping that is) - and am hoping that backpacking will turn into something I do for years to come. The list is more like the "everything I would need for backpacking"...not the "everything I would need for one trip."

I've got a GPS - and really don't know how to use a map with a compass. I know that the compass reads north and how to tell what direction I'm going - but as far as being able to tell where I'm at on the map - that's another story. Probably best bet for me would be to bring extra batteries and be really careful with my GPS. lol. The first few trips I'll being going on - I'll be going short distances and down some regularly used trails, so hopefully I'll be able to get a little experience finding my way before really taking off into the unknown. So I could definitely eliminate those items until I learn how to use them.

As far as weight goes - I see your point. I've been doing a lot of shopping and it's a lot of work weighing the cost vs. quality vs. lightness of all the different gear...but I am being conscious of it all.

I just ordered my first pair of hiking boots...the first piece of my gear list. Hopefully it won't take too long to save up and get the rest. I'll be sure to post pics once I get it going.

Thanks again!



Edited by wesarnold (03/25/10 07:41 AM)
_________________________
adventureempires.blogspot.com

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#131237 - 03/25/10 07:40 AM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: Glenn]
wesarnold Offline
member

Registered: 03/23/10
Posts: 45
Loc: Birmingham, AL
Originally Posted By Glenn
3. I'm not going to go too deeply into your menu, but I'm wondering how you plan to cook all that stuff - you don't include a stove and pot on your list. (I know you can use a fire, and roast the hot dogs on a stick - but it's a bit hard to do the same with mac-n-cheese. grin ) I tend to avoid perishable foods like hot dogs, myself, but I know people who take them, so I won't quibble too much. If you're interested in simplifying trail life, you might want to move to a simpler menu, but there's nothing inherently wrong with what you list.

4. Once you add that pot, you might be able to eliminate the bowl (just eat from the pot) and, if you decide you can live with just water to drink, you can eliminate the cup, too.



Two liters of water capacity is a bit sketchier than I'd choose personally, but I don't know the area you'll be hiking in - you may never need to carry extra water between sources, or have to make a dry camp. I tend to carry only a liter between sources, so I usually bring a 1-liter bottle with a 2 or 3 quart reservoir (Dromlite, Nalgene Cantene, Platypus, or Camelbak) empty in pack. The collapsible reservoir doesn't take up much space in the pack, and 4 quarts is plenty to get me from the last source of the day to camp, cook supper and breakfast, and get me to the first source the next day. (The exact amount you'd need for overnight depends on what you're cooking and how messy it will be to clean up - I might pass on mac-n-cheese at a dry camp.)


Just wanted to add that the food choices were all possible choices of stuff that looked appetizing to me. The stove that I've looked at getting is the Jetboil personal.

As far as water goes - I totally forgot about the use of a reservoir in my pack in addition to my bottle. So I will most likely definitely go with that suggestion.
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#131244 - 03/25/10 10:14 AM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
Originally Posted By wesarnold


I've got a GPS - and really don't know how to use a map with a compass. I know that the compass reads north and how to tell what direction I'm going - but as far as being able to tell where I'm at on the map - that's another story. Probably best bet for me would be to bring extra batteries and be really careful with my GPS. lol. The first few trips I'll being going on - I'll be going short distances and down some regularly used trails, so hopefully I'll be able to get a little experience finding my way before really taking off into the unknown. So I could definitely eliminate those items until I learn how to use them.




Learn to use the map and compass. Take the map and compass.

The GPS by itself is not going to be enough - our local SAR rescued people off a ledge by helicopter when they were trying to use a GPS in a panic trying to get back to their car as fast as possible. A GPS is a convenience, not an essential.

Use the map before you get lost and you will always know where you are. You don't wait until you are lost to pull it out. The best place to practice this is somewhere populated, not out in the wilds without trails. Take a class, teach yourself, do your friends, family and the local search and rescue a favor.

http://www.princeton.edu/~oa/manual/mapcompass.shtml
http://rockyweb.cr.usgs.gov/outreach/gps/map_and_compass.html
http://www.buckskin.org/Resources/Outdoor/compass1.htm
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

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#131250 - 03/25/10 02:11 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: lori]
ChrisFol Offline
member

Registered: 07/23/09
Posts: 387
Loc: Denver, Colordo
You could go out tonight and be just fine with the gear you have. Here are just some suggestions:

- Nix the rain cover. Use a Hefty trash compactor as a pack liner to waterproof.

- Tent-- don't forget the pegs.

- Nix the handheld light and the extra batteries. Put in fresh batteries before your trip and they will last you long enough.

- Only one knife is needed.

- Nix the trowel-- just use a rock or tent peg etc.

- Nix the GPS. A map and compass is enough, if you know how to use them.


- Nix Tent repair kit-- just use ductape.

- Nix the bowl-- just eat out of your pot.

- Overnight trip, you won't need to two pairs of socks and two lots of underwear. Chances are you won't need liners either. For overnight trips, check the weather forcast and you may be able to leave some items at home.

- Nix either the fleece pants or the long johns. You won't need both, except in the colder months.

- Towel-- I hope this is a pack towel or a banadana and not an actual towel.

- Water is really down to your location and the availabilty of water. I carry two 32oz Gatorade bottles filled with water and then two, 2L Platypus (folded up), which serves double duty as both my resivor and with my frontier pro attached, it becomes my filter. So for just under 8oz I have a system that can provide me with 6L of water, filter it and with MicroPur, purify my water.

IMHO, 2L for an overnighter is cutting it close for both consumption and cooking if there is no water source. If there is a water source, two 1L bottles is plenty.

- You are also missing, what in my opinion, is the two most vital items of clothing-- warm hat and gloves.

- No sleeping pad listed?

- I probably wouldn't bring Mac & Cheese either-- clean up is too much to deal with.

- I see a bear rope listed, but no bear bag?


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#131256 - 03/25/10 05:49 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
Glenn Offline
member

Registered: 03/08/06
Posts: 2617
Loc: Ohio
I really like the Jetboil. It's not the lightest choice, but it's like they watched me cook, and designed a stove to fit. The thing is more fuel efficient than most canister stoves, so on longer trips I only carry one cylinder (with my old Pocket Rocket, I would take two cylinders on longer trips just to be safe - and usually have to use the second one once or twice.) The weight of the extra cylinder equaled out the extra weight of the stove.

I would definitely recommend the Jetboil, unless you're really, really limited on total weight.

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#131271 - 03/25/10 09:44 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: lori]
Pika Offline
member

Registered: 12/08/05
Posts: 1814
Loc: Rural Southeast Arizona
Let me second Lori on the GPS. I have backpacked, mountaineered, worked in the woods and explored for over 60 years without ever using a GPS. I learned to use a map and compass and the technique of dead reckoning in the late 40's and have never felt the need for anything else. In case you think I am nothing more than a Luddite, let me assure you, I used to teach use of GPS to students in forestry, range science and wildlife management. This was because the agencies that employed our students wanted that expertise not because it kept them from becoming lost. In fact, more were lost when using the GPS than those using a map and compass. If you take the time to learn to use a map and compass, then a GPS will be useful and a real asset. But, if you can't put yourself on a map, you are lost whether you know it or not.
_________________________
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#131288 - 03/26/10 09:11 AM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
Glenn Offline
member

Registered: 03/08/06
Posts: 2617
Loc: Ohio
I sent you a private mail.

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#131321 - 03/26/10 09:17 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
Tango61 Offline
member

Registered: 12/27/05
Posts: 931
Loc: East Texas Piney Woods
Quote:
and really don't know how to use a map with a compass.


IMO, the best book on learning how to use a map and compass is "Be an Expert with Map and Compass" by Bjorn Hjellstrom.


http://www.amazon.com/Be-Expert-Map-Comp...2549&sr=8-1

It is a good skill to have. Of course, SOME people on this forum ONLY use a GPS. (He shall remain nameless unless he chooses to chime in) smile
_________________________
If you think you can, you can. If you think you can't, you can't. Either way, you're right.

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#131322 - 03/26/10 09:18 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: Pika]
oldranger Offline
member

Registered: 02/23/07
Posts: 1735
Loc: California (southern)
I agree with the above posters. If you can't locate yourself on a map you are an accident waiting to happen and you are seriously deficient in a basic, absolutely vital outdoor skill. Take the time to learn to orient and read a map. It is really quite simple and you can start almost anywhere. You don't have to be in the wilds.

I also have searched for folks who lacked this ability. We eventually did find most of them.

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#131325 - 03/26/10 10:46 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: Tango61]
Trailrunner Offline
member

Registered: 01/05/02
Posts: 1835
Loc: Los Angeles
I'll second the suggestion for the map and compass book. I take mine out once in a while to brush up.

IMO people should pay their dues and learn the basics of the map and compass before "graduating" to a gps.
_________________________
If you only travel on sunny days you will never reach your destination.*

* May not apply at certain latitudes in Canada and elsewhere.

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#131328 - 03/26/10 11:21 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
wesarnold Offline
member

Registered: 03/23/10
Posts: 45
Loc: Birmingham, AL
I did some youtube searching and found some good instructional videos. I think I have the gist of the compass map enough to start practicing...now to buy a compass...hmm...
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#131329 - 03/26/10 11:22 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: Trailrunner]
Jimshaw Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/03
Posts: 3973
Loc: Bend, Oregon
Trailrunner
OK he choked out, I agree with you, you hafta walk before you run. Using a GPS is a bit like using a calculator, if ya don't know math, ya don't understand what the buttons do. A map is always a good idea, and the compass is the standard thing, and its good to practice with it at home and maybe even take it camping with you just so you will feel utterly stupid when you realise it doesn't help you figure out where you are. Then you can graduate to a GPS. It knows where you are and where your truck is, and you still won't be able to find where you are on a map without a book or a decoding thingy. I have presented medium hard situations to experienced map and compass users who couldn't figure out where they were, its an art. Hey navigation is an art, like learning the math. But either way it takes practice. I personaly do not carry a compass. And generally I will have a Google Earth photo printout rather than a map.
Jim
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These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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#131367 - 03/27/10 10:27 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
OwenM Offline
newbie

Registered: 03/25/10
Posts: 14
Loc: AL
Originally Posted By finallyME
You are in Alabama, it isn't that cold.

It feels a much colder here at the same temps, presumably due to the humidity. I just came back from Utah a few weeks ago. With daytime temps in the 40s at Zion and 30s at Bryce(getting waist-deep in snow on some trails), I used none of my cold-weather gear, and wore a cotton t-shirt instead.

btw, I thought Utah was fantastic, and would relocate in heartbeat if it was practical. Going back West to part of the Grand Canyon in a few weeks, which we missed to spend more time at Zion. Planning to come back and hike the Narrows at Zion, and maybe someday visit Canyonlands and Arches. I'm hooked.

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#131371 - 03/28/10 01:12 AM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: OwenM]
wesarnold Offline
member

Registered: 03/23/10
Posts: 45
Loc: Birmingham, AL
Yes, the weather here in AL is not very describable - it must be experienced to be truly understood. lol
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#131380 - 03/28/10 10:52 AM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
wesarnold Offline
member

Registered: 03/23/10
Posts: 45
Loc: Birmingham, AL
Mmk.

I did a bit of updating to my list.

Here it goes:

Backpacking Gear List
1. Backpack (w/ rain cover OR garbage bag)
2. Tent
3. Sleeping Bag (w/ stuff/compression sack)
4. Lights (headlamp)
5. Stove and Utensils (jetboil + utensil)
6. Water filtration/purification (filter and/or chemical)
7. Water Storage – Platypus Reservoir (1.8L) + 1 1L collapsible bottle.
8. Knife
9. First Aid Kit and personal medications
10. Sun screen
11. Bug Spray
12. Blistex
13. Navigation
- GPS (Garmin Colorado)
- Compass + Topo Map
14. Fire starter (waterproof matches OR lighter)
15. Toilet paper and trowel
16. Duct Tape (can’t go anywhere without it)
17. Camera
18. Bear hanging/multi-use rope
19. Assorted Zip-lock freezer bags

20. Clothing (all 100% synthetic or wool and quick drying) (w/ stuffsack(s))

• Note: this list also includes clothing I would be currently wearing – NOT just carrying.
- Shirt
- Shorts
- Pants
- Hat
- Underwear x2 pair
- Socks x2 pair + liner socks
- Fleece jacket
- Long Johns (cold weather only)
21. Hygiene (for longer trips ONLY)
- Toothbrush and toothpaste
- Soap (biodegradable)
- Pack towel
22. Food
- High protein snacks (clifbar Roks)
- Oatmeal
- Grits
- Gorp
- Ramon Noodles
- Chicken in a bag
- Beef Jerky
- Hot dogs
- Granola bars
- Trail bars
- Power bars
- Instant soup
- Cereal w/ powdered milk
- Tea/coffee bags
_________________________
adventureempires.blogspot.com

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#131382 - 03/28/10 11:51 AM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
Jimshaw Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/03
Posts: 3973
Loc: Bend, Oregon
Your list looks good, now get out there and try it out. Its the experience not the gear that counts. Use Google Earth or a topo program to load up your way points, measure trails etc. I like to print my own maps and Google Earth photo and write way point info on them.
Jim
_________________________
These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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#131386 - 03/28/10 12:30 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: Jimshaw]
ChrisFol Offline
member

Registered: 07/23/09
Posts: 387
Loc: Denver, Colordo
You are all set to go. Although I still do not see a sleeping pad on your gear list??

My advise. Make a spreadsheet of what is going in your pack and then when you get home from your trip take out each item and discard what didn't work for you, and as you gain more experience, the less gear you will think that you need.

Now go out and have fun.

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#131387 - 03/28/10 01:29 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
wesarnold Offline
member

Registered: 03/23/10
Posts: 45
Loc: Birmingham, AL
Shoes and stove on the way! More stuff as the paychecks roll in. Will post up pics once I got 'em!
_________________________
adventureempires.blogspot.com

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#131391 - 03/28/10 02:56 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
OwenM Offline
newbie

Registered: 03/25/10
Posts: 14
Loc: AL
This may be more than you were looking for, but this orienteering club meets at Oak Mountain:
http://www.vulcanorienteering.org/index.php?page=home

Found that looking for orienteering courses at Oak Mountain. They offered those some years ago, as I recall.

Check out Cheaha, Sipsey Wilderness/Bankhead for places to hike and camp. I went to Little River Canyon last week, and it was great, but I think there's no overnighting in the canyon itself, and there's not many trails. One goes from Eberhart Point to the canyon floor, and then you can go either way along the river I suppose. Oak Mountain is fine for checking out gear, or a few overnighters, but gets old quick since there's not a lot to see or do there. Used to go to Sipsey with friends from that area, and am going to check out a couple of trails at Cheaha this week, maybe Wednesday. Tons of places to go for dayhikes around here, too.

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#131401 - 03/28/10 07:01 PM Re: Opinion's on my gear list [Re: wesarnold]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
If you're serious about being able to navigate... don't cheap out on the compass. Get one with a mirror and adjustable declination, and you will be able to navigate while walking as well as adjust declination as you travel interstate to backpack. Declination changes sometimes over time as well - some older maps of my area show different declination than newer ones.

And if you are hiking with a group - make sure everyone knows to use the declination on the map they are using so you all wind up in the same general area if you are separated. Better, make sure you all have the same map.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

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