Ultralight Adventure Equipment (ULA)  

         
 
 
BACKCOUNTRY FORUM
GENERAL DISCUSSION

 
Amazon.com
Backpacking Forums
BackcountryGear.com
backcountry gear

---- Our Gear Store ----
The Lightweight Gear Store
 
 ULTRA-LIGHT 

Ultralight Backpacks
Ultralight Bivy Sacks
Ultralight Shelters
Ultralight Tarps
Ultralight Tents
Ultralight Raingear
Ultralight Stoves & Cookware
Ultralight Down Sleeping Bags
Ultralight Synthetic Sleep Bags
Ultralight Apparel


the Titanium Page
WM Extremelite Sleeping Bags

 CAMPING & HIKING 

Backpacks
Tents
Sleeping Bags
Hydration
Kitchen
Accessories

 CLIMBING 

Ropes & Cordage
Protection & Hardware
Carabiners & Quickdraws
Climbing Packs & Bags
Big Wall
Rescue & Industrial

 MEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 WOMEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 FOOTWEAR 

Men's Footwear
Women's Footwear

 CLEARANCE 

Backpacks
Mens Apparel
Womens Apparel
Climbing
Footwear
Accessories

 BRANDS 

Black Diamond
Granite Gear
La Sportiva
Osprey
Smartwool

 WAYS TO SHOP 

Sale
Clearance
Top Brands
All Brands

 Backpacking Equipment 

Shelters
BackPacks
Sleeping Bags
Water Treatment
Kitchen
Hydration
Climbing


 Backcountry Gear Clearance


 WINTER CAMPING 

Shelters
Bivy Bags
Sleeping Bags
Sleeping Pads
Snow Sports
Winter Kitchen

 SNOWSPORTS 

Snowshoes
Avalanche Gear
Skins
Hats, Gloves, & Gaiters
Accessories

Stay Healthy--Eat Well

MARY JANES FARM ORGANIC MEALS

Mary Janes Farm Organic Backcountry Meals

NATURAL HIGH GOURMET MEALS

Natural High

 

Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#195918 - 06/24/16 10:48 AM Backpacks and Airlines
Nebraska Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/12/16
Posts: 7
Loc: Michigan
Morning all,

I am heading out to Colorado for 10 days, and this is my first time flying with my gear, and not driving. I carry an Osprey Atmos 65....What is yalls input on purchasing an airliner bag to put your pack into? Is it worth the $40? Anyone experience any issues if their bag was open to the airline elements?

Airporter Bag




Edited by Nebraska (06/24/16 10:49 AM)

Top
#195920 - 06/24/16 01:58 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: Nebraska]
aimless Offline
Moderator

Registered: 02/05/03
Posts: 2838
Loc: Portland, OR
I haven't air-traveled with my backpacking gear, yet, so I can't give a very full answer. I do know that airline baggage handlers are not gentle. They are working against the clock and tend to do whatever is fastest, not what's best for your baggage.

The general advice I've read before is that it is worth enclosing your pack inside a duffel, so your exterior straps don't get snagged or ripped. The item you linked to looks fairly deluxe and ought to work very well. Odds are you can find a cheaper way to accomplish the same task, so I guess it comes down to how much money or time seems appropriate to spend. I would also consider the prospects for re-use. A common duffel bag might have more future uses for you.

Top
#195921 - 06/24/16 02:09 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: aimless]
bluefish Offline
member

Registered: 06/05/13
Posts: 677
Purchase a duffel. Straps and such catch in the conveyor belts and can tear the pack to shreds. Often the TSA will look in backpacks as lots of BP stuff looks like bomb material, if it's in a duffel , at least it catches the spillover. They do not put it back in the way it was. Trust me. Do not fly with fuel of any type, either. If it's a white gas or multi fuel, I dismantle them to prove it contains zero fuel. If you use collapsible trekking poles, have a spare set of shoes or a fishing rod tube, you can throw that in too. Don't forget your size limit is 62" total width x height x depth for most airlines .For example, if your pack is 32 inches high 10" depth and 18" wide = 60" it makes it.
The duffel won't change that figure much, if at all.


Edited by bluefish (06/24/16 03:17 PM)
_________________________
Charlie

Top
#195953 - 06/27/16 09:38 AM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: bluefish]
Nebraska Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/12/16
Posts: 7
Loc: Michigan
thanks for all the feedback!

Top
#195995 - 07/01/16 05:39 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: Nebraska]
Barefoot Friar Offline
member

Registered: 01/23/09
Posts: 175
Loc: Houston, Alabama
I took my JanSport pack to Ecuador a couple summers ago. I ended up getting a cloth laundry bag and stuffing the loaded pack inside to keep my straps from going everywhere. Granted, I was not packed for backpacking, so I didn't have my stove, pot, etc. that looks so crazy on x-ray.

My brother-in-law just joined the Peace Corps this spring and flew to the Republic of Georgia with a similar setup. It worked well for him, too -- but again, no stove, no pot, nothing suspicious looking.

The duffel mentioned above is a good idea, too. That idea gives you a bit more room to pack things like a post-trail change of clothes.
_________________________
"Stand in the ways and see, and ask for the old paths, where the good way is, and walk in it; then you will find rest for your souls."

Top
#196002 - 07/02/16 08:48 AM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: bluefish]
ndsol Offline
member

Registered: 04/16/02
Posts: 673
Loc: Houston, Texas
Bluefish has it right. I will be leading a group of 13 scouts and adults this month with a flight to Seattle from Houston. I provide a list of what goes where for the flight:

Wear or carryon:

1. Boots – Wear (Remove for WTMD or WBI)
2. Wallet
3. Lighter/Matches
4. Cameras / Electronics
5. Water Filter
6. Stove (Must be Clean; No Fuel)
7. Expensive Gear (Sleeping Bag, Tent depending on size)
8. Medicines
9. Jacket
10. No Liquids, Gels or Aerosols except in 3.4 oz containers or less, all of which must fit in 1 quart ziplock bag
11. No knives, hiking poles or fishing hooks

Checked (Max. 50 pounds):

1. Duffle Bag without wheels
2. Name and address on outside and inside
3. Food & Any Liquids (except for food you plan on eating on the plane)
4. Backpack
5. Clothing not worn
6. Knife, hiking poles and fishing hooks

Top
#196078 - 07/13/16 12:22 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: ndsol]
snapper Offline
member

Registered: 03/07/13
Posts: 37
Loc: NY
I'm not a regular for the airlines but the couple of times I've traveled with my pack I haven't put it in any duffle or other "protective" bag. What I have done (based on suggestions I read long ago) is tighten up my compression straps and tuck the remaining strap under itself; tighten up my shoulder straps to the back of the pack; wrap my hip belt around the front of the pack and snuggly tighten the belt, tucking any remaining strap under the buckle (hope that all makes sense). So far I've done this without any incidents or problems with a Lowe pack to/from Ireland & the Boundary Waters plus a canoe pack (like an old Duluth pack) for a trip to the Okefenokee NWR via Jacksonville, FL from Albany, NY w/ a stopover in Baltimore.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

snapper


Edited by snapper (07/13/16 12:23 PM)

Top
#196236 - 08/03/16 10:46 AM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: snapper]
Snappypepper Offline
member

Registered: 08/02/16
Posts: 18
We pack our empty packs in a large military style duffel and then cram our other gear in and around them. I wouldn't pack it and then travel with it because odds are you will need to repack it before you set off on foot anyway. We tend to pick up a lot of our food/snacks close to our destination to keep things from melting or getting ruined. Find an outfitter or Wal Mart to buy your fuel near your destination.

Top
#196244 - 08/04/16 09:20 AM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: Snappypepper]
ndsol Offline
member

Registered: 04/16/02
Posts: 673
Loc: Houston, Texas
Snappypepper is right about having to repack before you set out. I know on this recent trip it certainly took some time to do this. Thanks, TSA. frown

Top
#196274 - 08/07/16 08:29 AM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: ndsol]
bluefish Offline
member

Registered: 06/05/13
Posts: 677
I seem to draw the lucky straw as far as TSA goes, it's happened to me 3 times. The first was without a duffel, and the pack came down the carousel with the extension collar fully extended and banging around, about to spew its contents. They also confiscated an empty fuel bottle. No problems since going with an added layer, as they seem to not want to bother, or they've not been able to damage or lose anything since it's contained. The pack has been messed up, but not in danger.


Edited by bluefish (08/07/16 02:58 PM)
_________________________
Charlie

Top
#196284 - 08/07/16 05:52 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: bluefish]
Barefoot Friar Offline
member

Registered: 01/23/09
Posts: 175
Loc: Houston, Alabama
I don't care so much if they go through my stuff. But if you're going to rip through my bag, at least have the decency to put it back the way you found it.
_________________________
"Stand in the ways and see, and ask for the old paths, where the good way is, and walk in it; then you will find rest for your souls."

Top
#196286 - 08/07/16 06:08 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: bluefish]
ndsol Offline
member

Registered: 04/16/02
Posts: 673
Loc: Houston, Texas
The empty fuel bottle confiscation is an example of why I keep my stove in my carry-on. At least then I have a chance to discuss with a TSO why it is not a WEI.

This past trip the TSO did a bag check of a scout's carry-on and pulled out his stove. I explained what it was and how it was not prohibited. Eventually she was satisfied. And on that same leg I did receive a love note from the TSA in my checked bag.

Top
#197218 - 12/19/16 08:22 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: Barefoot Friar]
mekineer Offline
member

Registered: 07/23/13
Posts: 71
I use a 40 liter backpack. Isn't that small enough to just take everything with me as a carry-on?

Top
#197225 - 12/20/16 07:56 AM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: mekineer]
ndsol Offline
member

Registered: 04/16/02
Posts: 673
Loc: Houston, Texas
Originally Posted By mekineer
I use a 40 liter backpack. Isn't that small enough to just take everything with me as a carry-on?


Generally, carry-on size limitation is around 9 inches x 14 inches x 22 inches.

The other question is whether you are carrying a knife, fishing hook, liquids, etc. that are not allowed to be in a carry-on, but must be checked.

Top
#197230 - 12/20/16 12:43 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: ndsol]
BrianLe Offline
member

Registered: 02/26/07
Posts: 1144
Loc: Washington State, King County
Quote:
The other question is whether you are carrying a knife, fishing hook, liquids, etc.

The "etc" can include trekking poles, stove sometimes (sometimes not, hard to tell what will get them going), some foods might come under the liquids or gels thing (for example, some people like to bring olive oil to put in their food).

The tricky thing is that not only do rules change, but enforcement can vary. I have a friend who swears he always brings his trekking poles as carry-on with never a problem. Except the one trip where he and I flew together and he was stopped at the security area after I had gotten through, had to go back and check his poles separately. Then the poles for some reason came out in the "oversized" luggage place on the other end (which I guess was really "unusually sized" luggage output), so we wasted more time on arrival trying to find his poles. PITA.

IMO, better to just plan on checking luggage if you're flying unless you really can get by with no poles and no knife on your trip. Hiking the Camino de Santiago in Spain I did just that, though I did buy a cheap knife on arrival and gave it away at the end.

When my wife and I fly to hike somewhere, we typically check one bag between us, and use the other backpack as a sort of shared carry-on, and that works well. I think it would be nice if airports with a lot of backpacking options in the area had a little business where they would rent poles and knives, sell stove fuel, and hold your protective duffel bag for you. Probably not enough demand, but would be nice! Alternatively, a hostel in the area could do at least some of this perhaps.
_________________________
Brian Lewis
http://postholer.com/brianle

Top
#197231 - 12/20/16 01:01 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: BrianLe]
mekineer Offline
member

Registered: 07/23/13
Posts: 71
I don't use poles, and I don't use a stove, and I can get by without a knife. I actually have a small knife that disguises as a single key.

I guess the questionable? items I would bring are:
- folding mini scissors
- a saw composed of a single wire and plastic loops on the ends
- a multitool that folds to 2" long and has pliers and 4 screwdrivers
- small bic lighter
- a micro bottle opener
- a micro wine bottle opener

...but I could make due without all of these things, or buy something inexpensive on the other end. That would be my preference. Actually, my preference would be to do away with TSA bag check. But that's not up to me, unfortunately. If you travel internationally, they may have different opinions of what can and can't go. For example, a set of mini screwdrivers that was just the thing the official may have needed.

edit:
freeze dried food allowed: https://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?search=freeze%20dried%20foods (I use the campfire method, or I can also soak during the day as I hike, if I'm desperate)


Edited by mekineer (12/20/16 01:51 PM)

Top
#197232 - 12/20/16 01:36 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: ndsol]
mekineer Offline
member

Registered: 07/23/13
Posts: 71
ndsol, I've read that backpacks are quite often overlooked by airlines, if they aren't exact measurements, because they can change shape to fit in most places. That's not official, but at the moment I feel safe to carry the 40 Liter backpack.

Top
#197233 - 12/20/16 03:10 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: mekineer]
ndsol Offline
member

Registered: 04/16/02
Posts: 673
Loc: Houston, Texas
Originally Posted By mekineer
I don't use poles, and I don't use a stove, and I can get by without a knife. I actually have a small knife that disguises as a single key.

I guess the questionable? items I would bring are:
- folding mini scissors
- a saw composed of a single wire and plastic loops on the ends
- a multitool that folds to 2" long and has pliers and 4 screwdrivers
- small bic lighter
- a micro bottle opener
- a micro wine bottle opener

...but I could make due without all of these things, or buy something inexpensive on the other end. That would be my preference. Actually, my preference would be to do away with TSA bag check. But that's not up to me, unfortunately. If you travel internationally, they may have different opinions of what can and can't go. For example, a set of mini screwdrivers that was just the thing the official may have needed.

edit:
freeze dried food allowed: https://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?search=freeze%20dried%20foods (I use the campfire method, or I can also soak during the day as I hike, if I'm desperate)


Food is fine; it's just liquids and gels. Almost everywhere I go, campfires are not permitted, so I do need the stove, which I do as a carryon with buying fuel at my destination.

Your list should be fine, except perhaps the saw as it might be viewed as a garrote. What is incongruent is that while small pocket knives are not permitted, scissors with up to 3" blades are. Many have a screw holding them together, which means you can readily unscrew them and have two knives longer than your little pocket knife.

If you do have a small knife disguised as a key, I would recommend not taking it in the cabin. If TSA finds it, they may consider that to be "artful concealment", which would cause you greater trouble.

As for the size of your pack, it can also depend on the airline. Certain ones will weigh and measure every carry-on. When I mentioned the size above, that was for mainline planes. Smaller ones may require you to gate check what would fit on that 737, for example. On the other hand, I am looking forward to my upcoming flight on an A380.

Top
#197237 - 12/20/16 06:02 PM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: ndsol]
balzaccom Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 1719
Loc: Napa, CA
While the NTSA has guidelines, there is still a lot of room for interpretation by local staff.

I fly 100K miles per year. My security check is a lot different when I fly on my usual airline, vs. when I fly somebody else.

Even more true in Europe, where Lufthansa is usually quite strict, while Alitalia is....not.
_________________________
balzaccom

check out our website and blog: http://www.backpackthesierra.com/home

Top
#197308 - 12/29/16 09:12 AM Re: Backpacks and Airlines [Re: Nebraska]
pcieluch Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/01/16
Posts: 12
Get a large duffle bag for your gear and have that checked. Then keep the pack with maybe a few items in it. Then use it as a carry on making sure you can put it in a overhead. You should with not much in it.

Top

Shout Box

Highest Quality Lightweight Down Sleeping Bags
 
Western Mountaineering Sleeping Bags
 
Lite Gear Talk - Featured Topics
Bivvy Sack combo Arrangement
by Jim M
10/18/17 01:58 AM
what is the lightest framed backpack around 40L
by toddfw2003
10/16/17 07:23 PM
a worthy challenger to the msr pocket rocket2
by the-gr8t-waldo
10/16/17 01:28 PM
Backcountry Discussion - Featured Topics
Backpacking/Camping Near Savannah, GA
by Sean&Brit
Today at 08:27 PM
Napa Fires
by balzaccom
10/11/17 07:43 PM
Backpacking the Ouachita Trail thanksgiving
by toddfw2003
10/05/17 11:54 PM
Make Your Own Gear - Featured Topics
lightest grommets to use
by toddfw2003
Today at 06:13 PM
alcohol stove comparisons
by Bike_packer
10/03/17 08:56 PM
Can footprint plasticizer harm tent ground-sheet?
by Weston1000
09/10/17 02:24 AM
Featured Photos
Breakneck Ridge, New York
May 2012 Eclipse, Lassen Park
New Years Eve 2011
Trip Report with Photos
Seven Devils, Idaho
Oat Hill Mine Trail 2012
Dark Canyon - Utah
Who's Online
0 registered (), 32 Guests and 0 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
Sean&Brit, Blackbuzzard, LivelyLiz, Weve, Tones21
12425 Registered Users
Forum Links
Disclaimer
Policies
Site Links
HOME
Backpacking.net
Family Hiking
Lightweight Gear Store
Backpacking Book Store
Lightweight Zone
Hiking Essentials

Outdoor Gear Daily Deals
Outlets, Sales, Bargains

Our long-time Sponsor, BackcountryGear.com - The leading source for ultralite/lightweight outdoor gear:

Backcountry Forum
 
 

Since 1996 - the Original Backcountry Forum
Copyright © The Lightweight Backpacker & BackcountryForum.com