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#75976 - 07/01/07 12:19 PM sleeping comfort
nimby Offline
member

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 216
Loc: intermountain west
What do you carry to sleep on? I usually end up sleeping on my side and a blue foam pad just doesn't do it anymore. For car camping I have started using a cheap beach air mattress topped with that blue foam pad to soften the 'tubeness', stuffed into an old flannel bag liner to hold them together. This gives enough depth for my hips, but is cumbersome to set up, and potentially too fragile for backpacking. The thought of carrying a couple of pounds for a 'luxury' self inflating pad is daunting.

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#75977 - 07/01/07 03:51 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
Slosteppin Offline
member

Registered: 12/25/06
Posts: 33
Loc: NW lower Michigan
I now carry a Big Agness Insulated Aircore air mattress. The ground just got too hard for a CFF pad to work. Even a Therm-a-Rest was not enough for me to sleep on my side. It is a bit lighter than the old Therm-a-Rest but a lot heavier than the CCF pad.

I don't like the time and effort to blow it up but I do sleep in comfort!

Slosteppin

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#75978 - 07/01/07 07:45 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
billk Offline
member

Registered: 08/20/03
Posts: 1196
Loc: Portland, Oregon
I use a 48"x20" piece of firm convoluted open-cell foam, about 2" thick, with a homemade nylon cover. It weighs 23 ounces, and with a little effort, rolls up to about the size of a 3/4-length Ridgerest. The bottom of the cover is coated nylon, so I can lay it directly on the ground without worrying about dampness if I want a place to sit while I eat or just loaf. I have the convoluted side up, because it rolls up better that way, with the coated side toward the outside. It might be slightly more comfortable with the flat side up. It's a little bulky, and certainly not UL, but it's more comfortable than anything I've tried. The insulation is sufficient for cold ground, but not snow.

Others I've used: Flat closed-cell foam, Ridgerest, Z-rest, original thermarest, ultra-light thermarest, and the old Berkley AirLift air matress.

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#75979 - 07/01/07 08:34 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
phat Offline
Moderator

Registered: 06/24/07
Posts: 4107
Loc: Alberta, Canada
Short answer, a hammock. it's lighter than anything else that's anywhere
close to as comfortable. Other than an XL wide cot topped with two thick
foam pads, it's the only thing I can sleep on my side comfortably in the bush.

Having said that if you just can't stand the notion of hanging between trees.
you may wanna try something like the new exped downmat or Big Agnes
insulated mat. Some friends bought me a wide big Agnes for a present and
it's not as heavy as an old school air mattress, and relatively comforable. Dunno
if it would have the depth on it for you for side sleeping (doesn't for me, but
I'm kinda large.
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#75980 - 07/02/07 09:01 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
dkramalc Offline
member

Registered: 09/19/03
Posts: 1070
Loc: California
I got a Pacific Outdoor Equipment Insul-mat Max Thermo last winter. I've only used it on the floor, but it was very comfy overnight when somewhat underinflated (fully inflated it's too hard). It only weighs 22 ounces, as I recall, and it is comparable in thickness to an air mattress. I bought someone's 3/4 length version a couple of days ago; haven't gotten it in the mail, but that one is only 15 ounces.
_________________________
dk

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#75981 - 07/03/07 07:56 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: dkramalc]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6518
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
I bought an InsulMat Max Thermo 3/4 length from Sierra Trading Post last winter. It weighs 17 oz (on my scale) and really does the job (I'm a side sleeper who gets really painful hips and shoulders on hard surfaces, and I have large hips). I have no trouble with its construction. The trick is not to blow it up all the way but only until it's about half full. Of course, when empty and folded it doesn't do much towards stiffening the pad pocket in my pack (Six Moon Designs Comet), but I also carry an insulating pad (30" x 20" piece of a Coleman closed cell foam pad, 3.5 oz.) for my dog, which takes care of that problem. At 17 oz., the Max Thermo is 11 oz. lighter than my 3/4 length Thermarest LE (no longer made), and cushions me better. I haven't yet tested it on freezing nights, though. If it turns out to be borderline, I might have to carry a second torso-length pad to help with insulation.

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#75982 - 07/03/07 09:35 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: OregonMouse]
dkramalc Offline
member

Registered: 09/19/03
Posts: 1070
Loc: California
OM, do you have any problems with the lower part of your legs "hanging in the air" due to the thickness of the 3/4 Insulmat? I haven't yet tried it, but thought it might be a potential problem for me. I suppose I can put my empty pack under there to take up some of the difference in height.

I may have been wrong about the weight; 17 oz sounds more like it (I think I saw 15 somewhere on the web, but that's less than 3/4 the weight of the full-length one). I'm looking forward to using it!
_________________________
dk

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#75983 - 07/03/07 07:55 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: dkramalc]
nimby Offline
member

Registered: 08/30/02
Posts: 216
Loc: intermountain west
I also wonder about the 'hanging' lower leg effect-this would give me knee strain, I think. Also, these look as 'tube-y' as a pool float air mattress. How do they feel-do the tubes flatten together, or is it hard to turn over against the tubes?

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#75984 - 07/03/07 08:28 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6518
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
Length: I sleep curled up in the fetal position, so no problems with length for me. And I'm 5'3". My feet may hang off but that has never bothered me. That's why I didn't want a BA mattress because even their shortest length (60") is longer than I need. For those of you who are tall or who like to stretch out, you'll have to try it for yourselves (maybe a night or two on the floor at home, so you can send it back if it doesn't work). A lot of folks seem to do just fine with a 3/4 pad, maybe with their pack under their lower legs, while others are miserable. If you've used a 3/4 pad successfully before, you should be just fine. If you didn't like a 3/4 pad before, you definitely won't like a 3/4 air matttress. YMMV!

Tubes: I inflate the mattress only about halfway. I therefore have no problem with getting stuck between the tubes or even feeling the space. I do a LOT of turning over, too! The space between the tubes could be a problem if you pump the pad up full. Pumping it up full makes far too hard a surface for me--similar to being directly on the ground! The manufacturer's instructions say to let the air out until the mattress is comfortable. With my Thermarest LE, I would let it self inflate and then, once I lay down, let a little air out of it to make it softer. With the InsulMat, I have maximum comfort when my hip sinks down in until just barely (maybe 1/2-1/3") off the ground. YMMV again!

Weight: The InsulMat Max Thermo on my digital postage scale is 16.8 oz. without the rather heavy stuff sack, which I don't use because I put the mattress in my pack's pad pocket. Evidently the manufacturer rounds down while I round up....


Edited by OregonMouse (07/03/07 08:41 PM)

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#75985 - 07/05/07 09:08 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: OregonMouse]
dkramalc Offline
member

Registered: 09/19/03
Posts: 1070
Loc: California
Sounds like you and I sleep similarly (except I'm about 4" longer than you) - and my previous pad was a 3/4 Thermarest LE also. So I guess I should be OK on the 3/4 pad. Good to hear! <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />
_________________________
dk

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#75986 - 07/05/07 01:53 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
Haiwee Offline
member

Registered: 08/21/03
Posts: 330
Loc: Southern California
I've stated often on these forums the main reason I decided to go lightweight was to be able to carry more luxury items. However, with arthritic hips that only get worse with each passing year, I don't consider my sleeping pad a luxury, but a necessity.

Right now I'm using a Pacific Outdoors 3.5" Insul-Mat. I've tried Themarests in several incarnations and none of them are thick enough to keep my hips off the hard ground. At a tad over 22 ounces, it's worth every gram.
_________________________
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#75987 - 07/14/07 07:51 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: OregonMouse]
Salish Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/02
Posts: 129
Loc: Seattle, Washington
I bought the Insulmat pad this past spring at an REI closeout sale for something like $29. I've used it only for camping thus far, but it has proven to be MUCH more comfy than my old T-Rest ultralight 3/4 pad. Mine is the full length pad (72"??) and I wish I had purchased the 3/4 length. I'm 5'7" and it's really too long for me (sleep on my side, too). I inflate it pretty much to it's fullest and then deflate it until I reach the level I like, after I lay down.
It packs pretty small in it's pouch and doesn't take up much room in the pack. My only problem right now is that I have always used the old 3/4 length t-rest as a rounded "frame" in my frameless Rodney pack, so I will have to buy a very cheap and thin closed cell pad to frame my pack. I can use it as a sit pad, too. I haven't tried my Insulmax pad over cold ground or snow, yet. I may have to pad it for that. I really love the added comfort over the t-rest, though.

Cliff

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/pacific-outdoor-equipment/insulmat-max-thermo/


Edited by Salish (07/14/07 07:52 AM)

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#75988 - 07/14/07 05:45 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: Salish]
hikerduane Offline
member

Registered: 02/23/03
Posts: 2124
Loc: Meadow Valley, CA
I see the Insul-Mat Max is no longer made. If they were that great what happened to them? I see they make a green one, too much $$$.

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#75989 - 07/14/07 10:03 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: hikerduane]
Salish Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/02
Posts: 129
Loc: Seattle, Washington
Quote:
I see the Insul-Mat Max is no longer made. If they were that great what happened to them? I see they make a green one, too much $$$.



I don't think they were "that great", since they were on closeout on REI.com. All I can say is I really like mine.

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#75990 - 07/15/07 07:14 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: Salish]
hikerduane Offline
member

Registered: 02/23/03
Posts: 2124
Loc: Meadow Valley, CA
I had some time to check out POE mats. The Ether Thermo 6 seems to be as close to the old Insul Mat Max that I can come up with at only 16 oz for the 3/4. I'm in the same boat as others, I have a Thermarest LE 3/4 and my shoulders and sometimes my hips start hurting part way thru the night. Depends on whether I was picking peas before my trip or squatted too much before a trip working in the garden and sometimes over the bp stove during a trip. At 22 oz. for more comfort and less weight I may pick up the thicker one, after my 21 oz Slinglight chair is paid off.:) Trying to offset the weight of the chair now and the 2.5 inch thick one would cut 10 oz. from the weight of the Thermarest and if I bring my Esbit stove and fuel for a week long trip I could cut another 4 oz, l would then be at 7 oz heavier than last year for a week long trip. Thank you.

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#75991 - 08/27/07 10:12 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
Dennis Offline
member

Registered: 01/04/02
Posts: 257
Loc: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
3/4 length Therma-Rest. This year I went from an Ultralite (pre Prolite 3) to a Prolite 4. The slight increase in weight was definitely worth it in sleeping comfort. I generally carry a small chunk of Z-Rest pad to use as a sit pad, kneel pad, and foot pad for sleeping.

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#75992 - 08/28/07 02:05 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
oldranger Offline
member

Registered: 02/23/07
Posts: 1735
Loc: California (southern)
A z-rest cut down to seven sections for three season use.. This covers me from shoulders to hips - just let the legs hang out there. I do choose the softest possible ground on which to sleep. It does make a difference. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

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#75993 - 09/07/07 09:45 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
Glenn Offline
member

Registered: 03/08/06
Posts: 2617
Loc: Ohio
The weight of an inflatable pad is a little off-putting - add in the weight of a chair kit for it, and it's even moreso. However, when I finally admitted that my hips would no longer go peacefully into that good night unless they had some cushioning, I found a way to have my chair and sit in it too, so to speak.

I now use a 3/4 length Thermarest Prolite 3 pad (13 ounces), and I also carry the 20" Trekker chair kit (11 ounces.) This gives me a soft, supportive bed and a warm, dry place to sit. The chair also keeps the pad (and, by association, my tent floor) clean. This combo replaced the 11 ounce Z-lite pad I had been using. So, how do I justify almost an extra pound?

Easy. I replaced my Granite Gear Vapor Trail pack (34 ounces) with a Granite Gear Virga (20 ounces.) The pad and chair do double duty as part of the suspension of the Virga. In fact, this is a very effective virtual suspension; the chair kit adds the benefit of stays, and lightly inflated, the pad is fairly rigid. It's so good that I've found it raises the load that I can comfortably carry in the Virga from the 20 pound manufacturer's rating to 25 pounds. Since my load for a 4-night trip (including food, warm clothing, and a quart of water) is only 20 or 21 pounds, that leaves enough capacity for hauling two extra quarts of water over a dry stretch, or to a dry camp.

Since I "need" the pad and chair to make my pack work, I don't feel at all guilty about lounging around in it at night. (Next to compound interest, the ability to rationalize may be humanity's most amazing invention!)

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#75994 - 02/11/08 04:36 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: Slosteppin]
traildad Offline
newbie

Registered: 02/11/08
Posts: 2
Another Big Agnes AirCore fan here. At 22 oz. a luxury which pays for itself every night. And I am in much better condition for the next day on the trail.

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#75995 - 03/18/08 01:05 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
spk Offline
newbie

Registered: 11/10/07
Posts: 4
I use a partially inflated hemorrhoid pillow under my hip

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#75996 - 05/27/08 02:38 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
kettle Offline
newbie

Registered: 03/27/07
Posts: 3
Loc: 10EC
You can't beat a hammock above freezing.

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#75997 - 05/27/08 09:38 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: kettle]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
Quote:
You can't beat a hammock above freezing.


Can't beat it below freezing either. Just add CCF pad, mylar blanket, poncho, peapod/thicker/second underquilt, extra clothes, and/or a bugnet overcover. Some combo of these elements has served many a hammocker well. Closest I've come to freezing was 33F and all I had under me was a CCF; I woke a few times because there was a slight chill on my back. Wasn't enough to rustle me out to add in a mylar blanket, however, though that would have likely added the few degrees I would have liked.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

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#75998 - 05/28/08 01:47 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
12Step Offline
member

Registered: 03/04/08
Posts: 89
Loc: Southwest Ohio
I try to make sure that I am nice and completely exhausted when I am ready for sleep. The first night on rare occasions I take a over-the-counter sleeping pill. The first night on the trail I am usually so tired because I am not used to flipping to a daytime sleep pattern. I work night shift.

The first day backpacking I am usually on second, third, and forth winds. When it's time to make camp, I'm usually wanting to skip dinner and just put up the tent and bed down.

Tom
_________________________
"Let's not miss the beauty of the forest by the ugliness of some of its trees." Bill W.

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#75999 - 05/28/08 02:52 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: lori]
Hector Offline
member

Registered: 12/20/04
Posts: 325
Loc: LA/ARK/TX corner
>> You can't beat a hammock above freezing.

> Can't beat it below freezing either

Down here, if it freezes, which does happen now and then, we all stay home until it warms up. That's usually sunrise, but I once saw the town grind to a halt for a week one winter. So we can't go camping below freezing because we can't make it to the woods, sorry. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif" alt="" />

To say something on topic, I use a Big Agnes insulated air pad with a BA Mystic when forced to ground, which almost never happens; otherwise an appropriate amount of CCF pad with the same bag in the hammock (pads don't wiggle around with BA bags, not even in hammocks). Except during the summer, when I use a Coolmax sheet in the hammock and dream of being cold (but even then I have a torso-length pad with me in case a thunderstorm cools things off or something).

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#76000 - 05/28/08 03:27 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: Hector]
phat Offline
Moderator

Registered: 06/24/07
Posts: 4107
Loc: Alberta, Canada
Quote:
>> You can't beat a hammock above freezing.

> Can't beat it below freezing either

Down here, if it freezes, which does happen now and then, we all stay home until it warms up. That's usually sunrise, but I once saw the town grind to a halt for a week one winter. So we can't go camping below freezing because we can't make it to the woods, sorry. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif" alt="" />


If I only went out when I expected it not to hit the freezing mark - I'd only ever camp in west edmonton mall <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />

In our rockies it's completely normal to have temperatures in the 85 ro 90 F range in the day, and
have it hit freezing at night - in July and August.

Quote:

To say something on topic, I use a Big Agnes insulated air pad with a BA Mystic when forced to ground, which almost never happens; otherwise an appropriate amount of CCF pad with the same bag in the hammock (pads don't wiggle around with BA bags, not even in hammocks). Except during the summer, when I use a Coolmax sheet in the hammock and dream of being cold (but even then I have a torso-length pad with me in case a thunderstorm cools things off or something).


I don't think I've ever had the hammock where I didn't use a CCF pad. I've never slept anywhere
that warm <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />

With me it's a ccf pad if it's "warm" - more typically it's at least the ccf pad plus a garington insulator type windblock taco made of my ID silponcho - that's usually enough for down to freezing. Below that
I start stuffing things into the insulator - starting with folded up space blankets, and ending with an inch and a half thick layer of poly batting. - which in full on cold weather setup has me comfortable
down to about -7 to -10 Centigrade - below that I give up and go to ground.
_________________________
Any fool can be uncomfortable...
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#76001 - 05/28/08 11:30 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
frediver Offline
member

Registered: 05/11/07
Posts: 114
I lost my first reply.
Short version
Try a insul-mat air matterass over a z-rest pad.
Very lite weight.
The z-rest will give added protection and insulation for the insul-mat air pad.
IMO a decent therma-rest pad just weights and costs to much for what you get.
A couple different companies make quality backpack traditional style air-mattresses .

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#76002 - 05/29/08 04:13 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: lori]
kettle Offline
newbie

Registered: 03/27/07
Posts: 3
Loc: 10EC
Lori and the rest of you are abolsolutly right. A hammock will adapt to almost any situation. I really have never been uncomfortable in a hammock. I slept in one in the 60's in Nam. And I have continued to use one since then. Above frezzing it is a no brainer. Below that you need to make some adatations.

A few months ago I went camping with my two sons, the first night I slept in MY hammock and they slept in the back of my truck with a hard topper. My sons are 17 and 22. It was sleeting for two days, I offered to switch.....and never got my hammock back all week.

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#76003 - 06/15/08 01:50 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
wandering_daisy Offline
member

Registered: 01/11/06
Posts: 2796
Loc: California
I have just completed an experiment. For the last four trips I used different sleeping pads. My ranking of comfort are:

1) therma-rest or similar brand air-pad -- the size and thickness really did not matter much (probably because I only weigh 115 pounds).

2) flexible blue pads with an extra for my hips

3) Z-rest -- I did not like the feel of the little bubbles

4) WallMart blue pad -- hard as a rock! even though thicker than REI flexible blue pad

The funny thing is, that regardless of sleeping pad, two Advil taken one hour before bed mititaged a lot of aches and pains. And selection of sleeping surface (find a nice indentation for hips) helps too!

I conclude that for us old folks, there simply are aches and pains that have nothing to do with the softness of the bed. I am even achy on my bed at home! Granted, the softer sleeping pads help, but do not eliminate all aches. I also find that my night aches increase with the mileage, ups and downs (ironically, more aches with down-hill) and the speed I hike each day. I am less achy at night when I take more rest breaks during the day.

I personally have had a horrible time keeping my thermarests from leaking. I have now gone through 5 (even sent two back to REI for repairs at $15 a shot). I spend about 50+ nights a year out backpacking, so I am not sure if they simply are not intended for heavy use. I do not get big holes, just slow leaks - the kind that I can never find and that require blowing up the pad about every 3 hours. Very annoying.

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#76004 - 06/15/08 04:30 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: wandering_daisy]
Earthling Offline
member

Registered: 02/22/03
Posts: 3228
Loc: USA
Nice post WD <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />

Maybe try Montbell pads instead of the Trest again in the future? I know Cascades Designs will repair the Trest for free, but you have to ship it to them <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif" alt="" />

I'm surprised that you are'nt/have'nt found the Trest pads to be that durable in frequent use <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif" alt="" /> They are the most heavily advertised brand, and you know what they say about that... <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif" alt="" /> it's the gear you don't see ads for that folks are using that gives one pause for thought in my book <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

Due to a bad back I can't sleep on any of the hard pads; only inflatables when on the ground. That's why I went back into the trees (ok, punned myself for all my detractors out there <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif" alt="" />). Hammock sleeping has really given me less issues regarding restless nights when I can hang one up.

It also matters the region and weather on the ground with a pad. Once up in NH I slept out on a really nice granite outcropping with little more than a very thin hard pad under me, and sleeping bag. Constantly woke to being cold and uncomfortable. The idea was great but not practical <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif" alt="" /> It's a place I call 'my office' looking off the West side of a rather large New England peak <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif" alt="" />

Even on a pine needle duff layered forest floor, I can't sleep well on a hard pad, has to be an inflatable. Some day I'd like to try one of those syn filled pads like the down filled ones in a side by side extended trip trial deal to see which one works for me, if either.
_________________________
PEPPER SPRAY AIN'T BRAINS IN A CAN!

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#76005 - 06/16/08 07:52 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: wandering_daisy]
Hector Offline
member

Registered: 12/20/04
Posts: 325
Loc: LA/ARK/TX corner
Daisy, you've just got to try an insulated air mattress (Big Agnes or Exped). It doesn't get more comfortable. A torso-length evazote pad is insurance against extra cold or an air leak you can't fix in the field.

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#76006 - 06/16/08 03:28 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: wandering_daisy]
Jimshaw Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/03
Posts: 3938
Loc: Bend, Oregon
Daisy
buy a down airmattress 3 inches thick. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />
You're welcome. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />
Jim <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />
_________________________
These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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#76007 - 06/16/08 07:27 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: Jimshaw]
hikerduane Offline
member

Registered: 02/23/03
Posts: 2124
Loc: Meadow Valley, CA
My Exped DAM felt great the first night I used it. Not the same since, I must have hit my body on a good night. The pressure or something must have been just right. As Jim would say,:)

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#76008 - 06/17/08 02:10 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: hikerduane]
Jimshaw Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/03
Posts: 3938
Loc: Bend, Oregon
Hikerduane
Do try to adjust the pressure, it does make a big difference, you don't want to overfill it, but you want your hips off the ground, and it most likely go down a bit in the night as it cools off. It should feel soft under you.
Jim <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />
_________________________
These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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#76009 - 06/17/08 07:10 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: Jimshaw]
hikerduane Offline
member

Registered: 02/23/03
Posts: 2124
Loc: Meadow Valley, CA
Hi Jim, I only use my Exped pad on car trips, (rarely), or in colder conditions. I'll fiddle more next time, I try to let some air out when hitting the sack, just don't want to let too much, as I don't get out of my bag until morning for anything, even to pee. The morning shock is enough.:)

I have thought some about a hammock, but the trees aren't always located properly in the Sierra. I will have to take more notice on my trips to see, if when I visit again, a hammock could be used. No new gear for over a year now, time to spend some $$$.

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#76010 - 06/21/08 10:00 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: spk]
captn Offline
newbie

Registered: 08/09/05
Posts: 12
I've been a POE 3/4 fan for a while ..... but I've found something a bit different.

I bought a Gossamer Gear torso sized nightlight pad that weighs in at 3.1 ounces. Then I bought the Big Agnes inflatable air core pillow, which is 16 x 12 x 2.5 inches and 3.5 ounces.

I put a piece of 2 inch velcro on both the pad and the pillow in a straight line on either side of the pad, then I cut a longer piece of the matching velcro to fit each side and hold the two pieces together.

If I'm lucky and find a nice thick pine duff bed I use the pillow as a pillow. If I'm on hard pan I turn it around and use the inflatable pillow under my hips, just like I would the normal POE mattress. I then take a 2.4 L platy with 1 L of water in it, and put it under the nightlight at my shoulder, making in essence a water bed under my top end. The platy adds less than an ounce to my carry weight over the normal 1 L platy that I used to carry.

So ... for under 8 ounces I have a 2/3 length pad with 2.5 inches, with air let out to my max comfort level, under my hips, a shoulder pad that is filled to whatever level is most comfortable, and the Nightlight is more than comfortable for the spaces in between.

I'm very pleased with the solution and also have a nice foam sit pad to hang around the fire with, as well as some water to quench my morning thirst that isn't freezing cold.

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#76011 - 07/07/08 05:52 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: captn]
hikerduane Offline
member

Registered: 02/23/03
Posts: 2124
Loc: Meadow Valley, CA
I was in Lassen VNP with another member of NorthCA Hiking and with all the gawking at the smoke from fires on the short drive there and my quick summit of Lassen peak and the looking here and there while hiking up and jogging down, my neck really acted up. Friday afternoon, the first day in the Park, about 3:00 PM or so, I had to lay down as I was getting vertigo and got sick to my stomach. Anyway, my friend set up my tent for me and put out my bag and DAM pad out. Well she didn't inflate the pad, thinking it was self inflated so I had to sleep on the hard ground more or less. Surprisingly, only my hips hurt that night, my shoulders were fine. I left on Saturday as I wasn't a whole lot better and still couldn't keep anything in my stomach. No water since Friday at lunch time. I was able Saturday night around 6:00PM to keep some Gookinaid down, so at 9:00PM that night I ate a few pretzels and a fruit pie from the store and went back to bed. My hips quit bothering me but my shoulders were hurting. Man, no rest for the wicked I guess. Slowing back to normal on Sunday and the pain in my neck went away.

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#76012 - 07/10/08 03:27 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: wandering_daisy]
chaz Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/07
Posts: 1149
Loc: Tennessee
Some Bourbon works for pain and helps you get some sleep also.
_________________________
Enjoy your next trip...

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#76013 - 07/13/08 05:41 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: nimby]
FrolickingDino Offline
newbie

Registered: 06/30/08
Posts: 11
Loc: Southeastern USA
I have a lot of metal in one hip and my leg and circulation issues. The only pad I've found that works is a Big Agnes Insulated Air Core pad. The He-Dino has switched to a Thermarest Prolite 3 since we got a bit older.

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#76014 - 07/20/08 07:22 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: FrolickingDino]
BobEFord Offline
member

Registered: 01/28/08
Posts: 72
Loc: SE AZ
Age has increased my ability to nod off. Especially while driving.

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#76015 - 07/30/08 08:48 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: BobEFord]
rionada Offline
member

Registered: 04/19/02
Posts: 493
Loc: Hervey Bay, QLD Australia
I have found that I am willing to carry some extra weight in order to get a good nights sleep. I am a cold sleeper, a side sleeper and I flop around alot. Here is the system that works for me:

PAD: Insulated Air Core (with sac and repair kit) = 24.8 oz
with a 3/16 inch foam sleeve that I made out of that white packing material (used for packaging electronics) Increases the warmth of the aircore by quite a bit (it can be used 4 season with the sleeve) I slide the aircore into the 3/16 sleeve. When not sleeping on it - I use the sleeve as a sit pad for sitting around the fire. Leaned up against a log it makes a very comfortable seat. Sleeve weight = 11.5 oz

BAG: WM Versalite long with 2 oz overstuffing (I'm a cold sleeper, but I've never had a cold night in this bag) = 39.7 oz

Total Weight = 76 oz or 4.75 pounds - and worth every once.

rionada
_________________________
i really don't think that applies to me.

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#76016 - 08/02/08 10:36 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: rionada]
chaz Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/07
Posts: 1149
Loc: Tennessee
Your sleeping habits sound very similar to mine. I mostly use a hammock but I like the idea of using the white foam you described. Did you glue it? And where did you find a piece big enough for a sac or sleeve? I'm thinking that it would work for insulation under my hammock as well.
_________________________
Enjoy your next trip...

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#76017 - 08/02/08 08:42 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: chaz]
rionada Offline
member

Registered: 04/19/02
Posts: 493
Loc: Hervey Bay, QLD Australia
Chaz

I had to call around quite a bit before I found what I was looking for. I finally found it at an art dealer (they use it for shipping. What I use is 3/16 inch thick by 2 feet wide white packing foam (it normally comes in very long rolls - so you need to find someone willing to cut you a piece). Be sure you get the kind without the slits in it. You want the solid stuff. I believe the slits are so that the packed object breathes - alot of electronic dealers use the slit stuff.

I then tape the edges together with SCOTCH 3710. 3710 has special adhesive that sticks really well to that white foam. You will have to google it - I can't remember my source. But, I did try regular packing tape before figuring out the 3710 and the packing tape does not stick well at all.

At the top of the white foam sleeve I left a 6 inch tab on one side that I use to seal the open end by rolling it over the mat and tucking it into the open end of the sleeve. I also added "wings" to the sides becuase I like to have my arms out of my sleeping bag and they get cold and uncomfortable on the hard ground. The wings are maybe 3 feet long and 8 inches wide and are attached where your arms would lay at your side.

The whole thing weighs 11.5 oz, but some of that weight is offset since it doubles as a sit pad. I can tell you that the whole system is quite comfortable and significantly warmer that the (insulated) pad alone.

I hope that helps.

rionada
_________________________
i really don't think that applies to me.

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#76018 - 08/04/08 08:31 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: rionada]
chaz Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/07
Posts: 1149
Loc: Tennessee
Thanks for the info, Looks like I'm going shopping for foam and tape. At 11 or so oz's I think the xtra warmth will be worth the effort. I will also try making an underquilt for my hammock.
_________________________
Enjoy your next trip...

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#76019 - 08/04/08 11:10 AM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: kettle]
jasonlivy Offline
member

Registered: 01/02/04
Posts: 654
Loc: Colorado
Quote:
You can't beat a hammock above freezing.
One word: NeoAir <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />
_________________________
Believe, then you will Understand...

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#108506 - 12/30/08 05:53 PM Re: sleeping comfort [Re: spk]
Geo Offline
member

Registered: 12/29/03
Posts: 32
Loc: 45 South
Lots of responses here - sleeping comfort obviously a subject of interest to us 'greybeards'! smile
One tip I don't think has been mentioned (especially for side sleepers) is that your comfort can be increased on hard terrain if you sleep so as your hip lies in a slight depression. You can scoop out a shallow depression to make one if one is not already there.
As far as 'mattresses' go, I use a 3/4 length Thermarest supplemented by a light closed cell foam Ridgerest pad that I place under the Thermarest and extended to lie beneath my feet.
_________________________
Dances With Marmots

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