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#204209 - 04/01/20 05:29 PM Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks
Kapol Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/01/20
Posts: 6
Hello everyone,

My name is Radek. I am a 33 year old male living in Poland. I weigh 77kg and am generally healthy, although I haven't done any physical exercises for more than a year.

I am planning a trip to Japan this year in August if all goes well with the virus. I stumbled across a hiking trail called the Michinoku Coastal Trail which is over 1000km long. Here is a map of the trail:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?hl=ja&ll=39.142883629811,141.4530535&z=7&mid=1gUdWx_hNctNunDhX2Ft1zS7Mxgs1tdVf

As you can see the trail follows the ocean, so it is very flat. There are some mountains here and there where the elevation reaches 500m, but they are far and in between, and you can probably hike around them. The temperature in August is between 20 and 25 degrees celsius.

I am seriously considering hiking the trail with a backpack and a tent. Given that I have no previous backpacking experience (other than your usual 2-3 day trip to the mountains with a very light backpack), I am very unsure about my abilities to hike long distances every day. Let's assume that the backpack will weigh around 20kg. (is this even a reasonable assumption?)

The way I would like to approach this hike is to walk about 20km each day, with some rest days if necessary. My initial plan is to hike for around 20 days in total, which would probably amount to 300km with change.

Our country is currently in lockdown due to the virus, so I will assume that I can start preparing for the trip in May, which would give me three months. My idea is to go on hikes 2 times a week to build strength/stamina. I will start with 10-15km with a 10kg backpack, see how that feels and increase the distance and/or backpack weight if I don't experience any issues. This would amount to a total of about 25 hikes in 3 months (more realistically about 20 because I have some other plans for the summer). I also plan on running 2 times a week and take the rest of the week off. In addition to that, I plan to go on a 5 day hiking trip with a tent and a "proper" backpack weight somewhere in June or early July. This might be a bit too much for me at that time, but it could be a good indication if I am ready for Japan.

My main question here is what can I realistically hope to achieve given the circumstances. I would really appreciate honest answers about my idea. I am OK with the fact that 20 days might be too much for me. If I get tired too badly I can always call it quits, catch a train and go to Tokio earlier than planned.

Thank you,
Radek

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#204213 - 04/01/20 09:09 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
balzaccom Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 2087
Loc: Napa, CA
Hi Radek

A few thoughts for you. A coastal trail doesn't always mean it is flat. Imagine if you were hiking in and out of a stadium over and over. You would have to go up steps and then down them, again and again. You would never reach a high elevation, but you would be doing a lot of climbing. just saying...

Also--if you can buy food on this route as you hike along, or even every few days, then 40kg is a very heavy pack. I think most of the people here would carry something between 8-12kg if you don't include food. All you need is a tent, a sleeping bag, maybe a warm jacket and a rain shell, and the pack itself...and the food you can buy. Even with food for eight full days on the trail, my pack weighs about 15kg.

20km is perfectly reasonable, if the trail is in good condition. If it's hard to follow, very steep or rocky, or even if it is in the sand for a long time then you may need to aim at fewer km....but I think your plan is perfectly reasonable...



Edited by balzaccom (04/01/20 09:09 PM)
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#204214 - 04/01/20 09:14 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
BZH Offline
member

Registered: 01/26/11
Posts: 1103
Loc: Madison, AL
This is very doable. 20 km isn't that far without significant elevation gain. If you are already in pretty good shape, you just really need to acclimate your body to that mileage. Stay active and get as much exercise now and your time frame for getting used to walking 20 km seems reasonable.

As far as a 20 kg pack that would actually be considered very heavy for people around here. It is easy to get your pack too heavy without significant discipline so start working on your gear now. Put together a list and spend time really evaluating how important it will be for you.

As far as gear you need, this trail is pretty easy. The weather will be mild and it looks like you will be going through towns every day. That means you will not need to carry much food or water at any point. Buy your food for the day and resupply tomorrow. Just make sure to plan your food purchases to make it to the next stop and carry some extra snacks (but not too much).

I found this 25 kg list for this trail: https://www.michinokutrail.com/packing-list
and I thought it is ridiculously heavy in electronics. It looks like a 10 kg list with 15 kg of unnecessary electronics (why is he bringing a cell phone and a kindle and a laptop?). Put together your gear list, post it on hear, and we can help you. The lower your pack weight the more enjoyable the walk will be... and this is supposed to be a vacation!

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#204216 - 04/05/20 09:59 AM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
billfish3r Offline
newbie

Registered: 02/10/20
Posts: 2
Loc: New Jersey
Do you live in a building with many stairs? I trained for hiking in patagonia by walking and running up 15 stories of stairs every day.


Edited by aimless (04/05/20 11:25 AM)
Edit Reason: removed unnecessary quote of entire OP

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#204217 - 04/06/20 11:09 AM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: BZH]
4evrplan Offline
member

Registered: 01/16/13
Posts: 884
Loc: Nacogdoches, TX, USA
I wish I could speak more to the long distance hiking, but unfortunately, I haven't been able to do that yet. What I can speak to is the electronics and how they add weight. I've noticed a trend for folks to carry more and more weight in electronics (phones, cameras, tablets, mp3 players, e-readers, rescue devices, battery backups, solar panels - the list goes on). When I go out for 2-3 days, I only carry a cell phone - no separate camera, charger, battery backup, nothing. I put my phone in battery saver mode and, as I've so far hiked in areas with little to no signal, airplane mode. I carry a paper map and compass, and I try to minimize my use of the phone, the only exception being to take photos. Used that way, the one lightweight device holds a charge for the entire 2-3 day trip. Now, as you'll be out for 20 days, you'll have to add at least a charger, but if you use this technique, I think you'll be very pleased with the freedom and the weight savings, and after a few days you most likely won't even miss all that junk.

Now the one nuance I would add to this, which I sorta glossed over, is if you are doing a higher risk trip or you're just not comfortable going without it, then by all means bring a rescue device. I think that's totally reasonable.
_________________________
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#204218 - 04/06/20 05:06 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: 4evrplan]
Glenn Roberts Offline
Moderator

Registered: 12/23/08
Posts: 2000
Loc: Southwest Ohio
I agree: electronics add weight quickly, and for me, they feel very out of place. Like you, I still navigate with map and compass (not a lot of navigating needed where I hike; almost always on well-marked trails.) I'm not a big picture taker, and (following the advice of an old hiking partner) when it gets dark, I go to sleep.

I agree with you about a safety device on high-risk trips (I don't take such trips, here in Ohio, Kentucky and Virginia; I'm not sure I could if I wanted to - the trails are well-marked and fairly well-traveled. I can count on someone finding me within 12 hours if I manage to break a leg or something.)

I keep trying to leave the cell phone at home, but there's one obstacle I just can't overcome: my wife says it makes her feel better if I take it. (Kind of like when I was little, and I had to put on a sweater because Mom was cold.)

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#204220 - 04/07/20 11:20 AM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
Kapol Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/01/20
Posts: 6
Thank you very much for all the responses.

I am pleased to hear that I should be able to pack much lighter than 20kg. I definitely don't want to take any unnecessary stuff which will only add to the weight. As for electronics, I want to take only three things: phone, power bank, charger.

I would like to discuss my potential packing list. I have already seen the link provided by BZH, so let's go through most of the items from that list:
  • Backpack - after some investigation I decided to go with the same backpack. It's a Deuter Futura Vario 50+10. The spec says that it can hold up to 15-18kg and weights 2kg.
  • Trail maps - the Japanese Ministry of Environment has maps in PDF form for the whole trail. I will download them and take them with me.
  • Compact first aid kit - I will probably need this, although I am considering taking only painkillers, some bandage and fingerprint protection. There will always be a town close enough to get there in case of needing help, so maybe I don't need the whole kit?
  • Lightweight tent, sleeping mat, sleeping bag - definitely needed.
  • Headlamp - needed. I am sure the batteries won't last the whole trip, especially if I use it inside the tent. Should I take spares with me or look for them in towns as I hike along?
  • Solar-charged lamp - although I could use it inside the tent, wouldn't it be enough to use the headlamp? Seems unnecessary to me.
  • Portable camping stove and gas - this is a tough one. On one hand, it would be nice to have one and be able to prepare hot food. On the other hand, I don't even know if Japanese convenience stores sell anything that can be prepared this way. I also didn't investigate how much gas would be needed for such a long trip.
  • Toiletries - I will need sunscreen and an insect repellent.
  • Quick dry towel - yup.
  • Sunglasses and hat - I don't wear sunglasses, but a hat is required.
  • Light-weight rope - could be useful for hanging wet clothes to dry off. But maybe I can just hang them on a tree branch or something?
  • Portable cup, metal reusable chopsticks, cutlery - I will take cutlery and maybe a cup.
  • Swiss army knife - yes.
  • Portable battery - I guess he means a power bank. As mentioned earlier, I will have one.
  • Portable solar panel - don't need it if I am not taking a solar-charged lamp.
  • Plastic bags - needed for dirty clothes and to protect stuff from rain.
  • Ziplock bags - needed to waterproof the most important items.

All right, now it's time to decide what clothes I need to take:
  • Shoes - I will most likely use the Merrell Track Glove 5. They are intended for barefoot usage but I have read that people are using them with socks and it works fine.
  • Lower body - I think I will need trousers and shorts (I have no clue how many I actually need; my gut tells me that I need two of each - whenever one is drying off, I can wear the other one). One pair of trousers has to be waterproof. To save space, I can buy trousers which have a zipper mid-way that transforms them into shorts.
  • Upper body - I think I will need t-shirts and long sleeve shirts (again, I have no clue how many). Also a light waterproof jacket.
  • Socks and underwear - the only question here is: how many?

I will also need some more toiletries: soap, toothpaste & toothbrush, maybe a shampoo (although I can just use soap).

Please let me know what you think and if I missed anything. And can someone tell me how much could all the stuff that I should bring roughly weigh? Is it really possible that it could be 12kg including water and food for one day? All constructive criticism is greatly appreciated!

Radek


Edited by Kapol (04/07/20 11:22 AM)

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#204221 - 04/07/20 12:24 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
balzaccom Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 2087
Loc: Napa, CA
Good list. Here are my thoughts:

Among the first list of things, the only ones I would question are:

> The First Aid kit--you really only need are some pain medicine for sore muscles, some quick fixes for blister and cuts...anything more serious, and you will visit a doctor--or buy something in town. Don't buy a kit in a plastic box, Just take a few sticking plasters (band-aids) some tape, some ibuprofen, and make do)

> The solar light. If you really think you need one of these, buy a Luci--$15, solar powered, very lightweight, recharges itself in sunlight. But you may find that you are tired, and want to sleep when it is dark!

> Cutlery and dishes. Plastic is your friend on the trail. Don't take metal anything--it's heavy and doesn't provide better performance.

> And the stove? Japan does sell ramen noodles!

> You seem to want to take a power pack. I wouldn't. But I am not you. I would just charge my phone once a day in town where possible---maybe while I was shopping, eating in a café, or doing laundry.

Now for the rest:


•Shoes - I will most likely use the Merrell Track Glove 5. They are intended for barefoot usage but I have read that people are using them with socks and it works fine.

>> You might also consider a lightweight pair of sandals for around camp, to give your feet a rest and a breather from these shoes.

•Lower body - I think I will need trousers and shorts (I have no clue how many I actually need; my gut tells me that I need two of each - whenever one is drying off, I can wear the other one). One pair of trousers has to be waterproof. To save space, I can buy trousers which have a zipper mid-way that transforms them into shorts.

> Yes, use the zipper leg pants. Take two pair, just in case. But they should be lightweight and dry quickly. DO NOT take any cotton clothes, as they soak up water, are heavy, and take forever to dry.

•Upper body - I think I will need t-shirts and long sleeve shirts (again, I have no clue how many). Also a light waterproof jacket.

> One long-sleeved shirt, one short sleeved shirt. That's all. You are not in a fashion contest. But also take a fleece and a rain shell--because the weather may require them. And if it is really cold, you can wear everything all at once.

•Socks and underwear - the only question here is: how many?

> Two days of each. Wash and dry one while you are wearing the other.

> I also recommend:

> Very lightweight pajamas, to help keep your sleeping bag cleaner. You can also wear these when you are washing your other clothes.

> A swimsuit. Weighs very little. Can also be used for shorts. And laundry day.

> A bandana--all sorts of uses, from picking up a hot pot to cooling off your head, to blowing your nose!

Hope that helps.




Edited by balzaccom (04/07/20 12:27 PM)
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#204222 - 04/07/20 07:09 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
BZH Offline
member

Registered: 01/26/11
Posts: 1103
Loc: Madison, AL
Originally Posted By Kapol
As for electronics, I want to take only three things: phone, power bank, charger.


Great idea. You probably won't need a very big power bank. Use your battery sparingly and recharge as often as you can (as recommend by Balz above)

Originally Posted By Kapol

[*]Headlamp - needed. I am sure the batteries won't last the whole trip, especially if I use it inside the tent. Should I take spares with me or look for them in towns as I hike along?


You can plan on getting batteries in town. Just carry one change with you. Or, you could just get a rechargeable headlamp and use your powerbank if needed.


Originally Posted By Kapol

[*]Solar-charged lamp - although I could use it inside the tent, wouldn't it be enough to use the headlamp? Seems unnecessary to me.

Seems redundant to me.

Originally Posted By Kapol

  • Backpack - after some investigation I decided to go with the same backpack. It's a Deuter Futura Vario 50+10. The spec says that it can hold up to 15-18kg and weights 2kg.
  • Shoes - I will most likely use the Merrell Track Glove 5. They are intended for barefoot usage but I have read that people are using them with socks and it works fine.



Deuter is a good brand, but what is most important is how it fits you and your gear. Same with Merrell. Fit is most important. Don't make a buying decision based on internet research. Make a decision after trying them on and seeing how they fit you. Even if you buy them through the internet, be prepared to return them if they don't feel good. A few bucks in postage is nothing compared to be uncomfortable for 20 days.

The standard advice around here is to buy your pack last to make sure your gear fits inside it and you can know how it feels on your back with the actual load.

Originally Posted By Kapol

  • Trail maps - the Japanese Ministry of Environment has maps in PDF form for the whole trail. I will download them and take them with me.
  • Compact first aid kit - I will probably need this, although I am considering taking only painkillers, some bandage and fingerprint protection. There will always be a town close enough to get there in case of needing help, so maybe I don't need the whole kit?
  • Lightweight tent, sleeping mat, sleeping bag - definitely needed.
  • Toiletries - I will need sunscreen and an insect repellent.
  • Quick dry towel - yup.
  • Sunglasses and hat - I don't wear sunglasses, but a hat is required.
  • Light-weight rope - could be useful for hanging wet clothes to dry off. But maybe I can just hang them on a tree branch or something?


All these points sound like excellent ideas. A little lightweight rope can be useful for repairs. Not a bad idea to bring a bit along

Originally Posted By Kapol
  • Portable camping stove and gas - this is a tough one. On one hand, it would be nice to have one and be able to prepare hot food. On the other hand, I don't even know if Japanese convenience stores sell anything that can be prepared this way. I also didn't investigate how much gas would be needed for such a long trip.
  • Portable cup, metal reusable chopsticks, cutlery - I will take cutlery and maybe a cup.
  • Swiss army knife - yes.


  • Put together a very small, lightweight kitchen (stove, fuel, cup, spoon). You don't need a separate cup for the stove, to eat, and to drink from. One cup can serve all three purposes. Have the ability to have a warm drink and heat up some ramen is a nice luxury.

    What kind of stove? Iso-butane canister stoves are easy to use and very popular. You should not have trouble finding fuel along the trail. Any general store near a campground should have it available.

    Another option is an alcohol stove. These are cheap, very lightweight and often handmade. You can buy from people online:

    http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

    or make your own:

    https://andrewskurka.com/how-to-make-a-fancy-feast-alcohol-stove/

    or... if your really crafty you can make a work of art.. and if you are super lucky you can meet Tetkoba along the trail:

    https://www.youtube.com/user/tetkoba/about

    Alcohol should be readily available along the trail, too (methanol, iso-propyl, or ethanol)

    Originally Posted By Kapol

    All right, now it's time to decide what clothes I need to take:


    one pair of clothes on your body and one pair to change in to. For lower body, I like one pair of lightweight pants and one pair of shorts.

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    #204223 - 04/08/20 09:46 AM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    Kapol Offline
    newbie

    Registered: 04/01/20
    Posts: 6
    Quote:
    Yes, use the zipper leg pants. Take two pair, just in case.

    Do you recommend to take only two of these without any additional shorts?

    Quote:
    And the stove? Japan does sell ramen noodles!

    Case closed :-)

    Quote:
    One long-sleeved shirt, one short sleeved shirt. That's all. You are not in a fashion contest.

    What happens in case my t-shirt is wet and the weather is hot? Do I just wear the long sleeve? I guess I can always roll up the sleeves.

    Quote:
    A bandana--all sorts of uses, from picking up a hot pot to cooling off your head, to blowing your nose!

    Great tip, thanks!

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    #204225 - 04/08/20 12:52 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    balzaccom Offline
    member

    Registered: 04/06/09
    Posts: 2087
    Loc: Napa, CA
    Yes to all of the above!
    _________________________
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    check out our website and blog: http://www.backpackthesierra.com/home

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    #204226 - 04/08/20 03:51 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    the-gr8t-waldo Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/16/11
    Posts: 180
    Loc: Tacoma, Washington
    Hi Kapol. your hike sounds great!..and hope that afterwards you post a review of the hike- I for one would love to read it. as for preparation for it, I'd suggest that you watch a few utube videos of long distance hikes. you'll find a lot of information that should answer most of your question about preperations. I would caution you not to buy stove until you find out what is available in the way of fuel in japan. My understanding is that although very popular here in the states, isopropane is not universally available around the globe, alchol is usually available.

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    #204228 - 04/09/20 01:51 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: the-gr8t-waldo]
    Kapol Offline
    newbie

    Registered: 04/01/20
    Posts: 6
    Originally Posted By the-gr8t-waldo
    I'd suggest that you watch a few utube videos of long distance hikes.

    Do you recommend any particular ones?

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    #204230 - 04/09/20 03:20 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    4evrplan Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/16/13
    Posts: 884
    Loc: Nacogdoches, TX, USA
    Originally Posted By Kapol
    Quote:
    One long-sleeved shirt, one short sleeved shirt. That's all. You are not in a fashion contest.

    What happens in case my t-shirt is wet and the weather is hot? Do I just wear the long sleeve? I guess I can always roll up the sleeves.

    Unless it's cold (in which case you'll want long sleeves anyway), I say just wear the wet shirt. It'll dry fastest on your body anyway.

    Incidentally, even in warm weather I wear long sleeves. They keep off the sun and the bugs and help with thorns and scratchy branches. In many cases, long sleeves will keep you cooler than short sleeves anyway.
    _________________________
    The journey is more important than the destination.

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    #204234 - 04/11/20 12:59 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    the-gr8t-waldo Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/16/11
    Posts: 180
    Loc: Tacoma, Washington
    there's a "long hike" tab on this site you might like to read..as for videos, I'd suggest watching just about anything by "Homemade Wonder lust" she is a very prolific writer/ video producer. I feel her Pacific Crest Trail hike would be the most relevant to your proposed hike.(just keep in mind, yours will NOT be as grueling) a few of her's deal with resupplying stops-something that has a lot of relevance to your hike. since I suspect your hike would have many more resupply opportunities available as well as over night hotel/hostel accommodations available.. which would allow you to lighten up that pack a bit, and make this more of a cultural exchange than her normal LD hike.


    Edited by the-gr8t-waldo (04/11/20 01:26 PM)

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    #204236 - 04/12/20 12:10 AM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    wandering_daisy Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/11/06
    Posts: 2865
    Loc: California
    It depends if the hike is ON the coast or ALONG the coast. My longest coastal hike was California Lost Coast, about 65 miles, 8 days. The first 25 miles is walking on the beach; the rest on a very poorly maintained trail with lots of 1000 foot ups and downs.

    Not sure if any of this applies:

    1) I really needed tide tables because there were points that were under water at high tide.

    2) Camping was limited by need of a fresh water stream, and these were unevenly spaced along the route.

    3) Between lots of rain and heavy dew on a trail overgrown with vegetation, I was constantly wet or damp. As long as you keep moving, it is fine. Aim to stay warm, not necessarily dry. Often I would simply go naked under my rain clothes. There was a constant wind so I needed an outer wind layer. If chilly I had one light weight wool layer. Sailors have used wool for ages because it retains warmth when wet.

    4) Shoes will be wet all the time. Waterproof shoes will eventually get wet. Better to have quick drying shoes like trail runners.

    5) I have observed that Japanese tourists who come here always have an umbrella. I actually have a 7oz folding backpack umbrella made in Japan!

    6) Keep insulating and sleeping clothes in a waterproof dry-bag.

    7) Either use a synthetic sleeping bag or a down bag that has the treated down that makes it water resistant.

    8) We have ticks and all sorts of creepy crawly insects. I have to check for ticks every evening, and be sure you have an insect proof tent.

    Your route may be entirely different. Try to get some local information on the route before you start. See what the locals use for equipment. I suspect your route is a lot more civilized than the Lost Coast.

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    #204237 - 04/12/20 05:28 AM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    Bill Kennedy Offline
    member

    Registered: 02/27/18
    Posts: 294
    Loc: Portland, Oregon
    I'd second the Homemade Wanderlust videos. Here's a link:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQhqmV26773qZhzqJz4VFcw/videos
    _________________________
    Always remember that you are absolutely unique, just like everybody else. -Margaret Mead

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    #204321 - 04/22/20 09:00 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    Kapol Offline
    newbie

    Registered: 04/01/20
    Posts: 6
    Thank you for recommending the Homemade Wanderlust channel. I watched her "Everything You Need To Know To Start Backpacking" playlist and I found the videos very informative. Watching them made me revise my packing list:

    New items:
    • Hand sanitizer - for cleaning up wounds etc.
    • Baby wipes (optional) - to make it easier to clean myself up.
    • Flip-flops - to help my feet rest and breathe around camp.
    • Nail clippers - I was thinking about taking nail scissors, but I guess nail clippers will be more useful for removing ticks in case I find any on me.
    • Lighter - the stove won't magically start working all by itself.
    • Needle + thread - for popping blisters and doing small repairs if necessary.
    • Waterproof dry bag - I am not sure if ziplock bags will be enough. Wouldn't it be sensible to put things like clothes in this bag to make sure they are dry even if my backpack gets wet? The backpack that I ordered has a waterproof cover, though...

    Apart from the above additions, I think I would like to take an inflatable sleeping pad instead of a foam sleeping pad. Dixie mentioned in one of her videos that it was hard for her to sleep on a foam pad because she sleeps on her side. I am also a side-sleeper.


    Edited by Kapol (04/22/20 09:02 PM)

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    #204325 - 04/23/20 01:45 AM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    Bill Kennedy Offline
    member

    Registered: 02/27/18
    Posts: 294
    Loc: Portland, Oregon
    If you use them to wade across streams, flip-flops are easily lost. A pair of cheap Teva-like sandals might be better.

    I wouldn't think nail clippers would be good for removing ticks. The little tweezers on a small Swiss Army Knife might be better.

    Sleeping bag and clothes should have some extra rain protection, unless you know you can count on good weather. You could use a plastic bag, like a trash compactor bag or big garbage bag as a pack liner. I'm sure one of Dixie's videos talks about doing that.

    Sleeping pad is a tradeoff. Closed-cell foam pads are light but bulky, can't puncture, handy for rest breaks, and less comfortable. Inflatable pads are more comfortable, can be punctured, have to be inflated every night, and are expensive.

    I've had good luck with the "self-inflating" pads, like the Thermarest Prolite series, which is open-cell foam in an airtight cover. For closed-cell pads, I'd suggest the Thermarest Ridgerest or Nemo Switchback.

    Another option, seldom mentioned, is piece of 2" open-cell foam, preferably the egg-crate-looking type, with a homemade nylon cover. About the same bulk as a closed-cell pad, but more comfortable.
    _________________________
    Always remember that you are absolutely unique, just like everybody else. -Margaret Mead

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    #204328 - 04/23/20 03:18 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Bill Kennedy]
    BZH Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/26/11
    Posts: 1103
    Loc: Madison, AL
    I agree with Bill. I don't know how you would use nail clippers to remove a tick. The worst thing you can do in tick removal is leave the head/pincers behind. I think clippers would do that. I've always had good luck using my fingers to remove ticks but many people prefer tweezers.

    I like inflatable sleeping pads. They are much more comfortable than foam. Its a luxury I willing to carry and deal with.

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    #204331 - 04/23/20 05:22 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    the-gr8t-waldo Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/16/11
    Posts: 180
    Loc: Tacoma, Washington
    Hi again ,Kapol, glad you liked the homemade wonderlust series. may I suggest that you get a copy of "LIGHTEN UP" by Don Ladigin. It's a pretty short paperback and on the used book lists fairly cheap too. I found it had with some very good ideas about making a backpack a bit lighter. …. have you read anything about the conditions one could expect for that trail/season/part of japan?

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    #204352 - 04/26/20 05:41 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    Kapol Offline
    newbie

    Registered: 04/01/20
    Posts: 6
    Quote:
    I don't know how you would use nail clippers to remove a tick. The worst thing you can do in tick removal is leave the head/pincers behind. I think clippers would do that.

    I agree. The nail clippers were a bad idea. I will definitely use tweezers.

    Quote:
    have you read anything about the conditions one could expect for that trail/season/part of japan?

    Yes. The links below show last year's weather in July in Aomori (north part of the trail) and Sendai (south part of the trail). You can change months on the right-hand side of the page.

    https://www.timeanddate.com/weather/japan/aomori/historic?month=7&year=2019
    https://www.timeanddate.com/weather/japan/sendai/historic?month=7&year=2019

    I have been thinking a lot about this trip for the last couple of weeks and I have come to the conclusion that I don't want to limit myself by setting an upper limit on the number of days on the trail. If I'm having fun on the 20th day and I want to continue walking, so be it. Theoretically, if I hiked through the whole thing, then it would take me 50-60 days. If this "theory" becomes reality, then I think it would be best to start before August. I am however worried about the pandemic - it might not be possible for me to get to Japan this early... I presume that I should be OK with my gear as long as the temperature does not drop below 10C (50F) at night, which starts to happen in Sendai around mid-November (which would allow me to start the hike mid-August). Does this sound reasonable?


    Edited by Kapol (04/26/20 05:42 PM)

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    #204718 - 08/24/20 04:56 PM Re: Preparing to hike 20km a day for several weeks [Re: Kapol]
    VanLess Offline
    newbie

    Registered: 08/24/20
    Posts: 3
    That how much I plan to hike per day too. I do it in loops, so I can't get stuck far from home while training. And started with one loop and increasing from there. The body responds fast with good nutrition, but my training path and the path I'll be taking is very easy and flat.

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