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#201254 - 06/28/18 12:14 PM Quilt question
PaHiker Offline
member

Registered: 02/12/15
Posts: 125
Loc: Western Pa, USA
Making my first quilt. Considering the side that would go under me would compress to the point where it's basically offering no insulation, should I bother insulating?

My thought was that when the air just has a chill to it I might want just an uninsulated top cover, but to have an insulated part for when the temps drop even more. Basically thinking of early fall, late spring, when overnight temps can swing a good deal.
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Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intent of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, and loudly proclaiming Wow! What a Ride!

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#201279 - 06/29/18 12:47 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: PaHiker]
BZH Offline
member

Registered: 01/26/11
Posts: 901
Loc: Torrance, CA
You are definitely correct that you don't need insulation under (except for your pad). But...the biggest issue with quilts is heat leaking around the sides as you shift in the night. I think you want some insulation near that interface. A bit of it may get compressed, but it could add some buffer as you shift in the night.

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#201280 - 06/29/18 12:52 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: BZH]
PaHiker Offline
member

Registered: 02/12/15
Posts: 125
Loc: Western Pa, USA
So, then, I would be looking at taking an extra non-insulated "quilt" during those months?
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Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intent of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, and loudly proclaiming Wow! What a Ride!

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#201282 - 06/29/18 01:09 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: PaHiker]
BZH Offline
member

Registered: 01/26/11
Posts: 901
Loc: Torrance, CA
hmmm ...maybe I read your OP incorrectly... not sure I understand what you are asking.

During warm seasons were you may not need any insulation you can just bring a light fleece blanket. Of course you need to be careful you are not caught out with temperatures dipping lower than expected. For that reason, I typically bring my quilt anyway. If it is a bit too warm I will stick a leg or arm out. This is pretty similar to how I regulate my body temperature at home (where it rarely gets very cold at night smile ). Does that answer your question?

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#201284 - 06/29/18 01:16 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: BZH]
PaHiker Offline
member

Registered: 02/12/15
Posts: 125
Loc: Western Pa, USA
No, I am talking about the mid- spring and fall seasons. Around here (Allegheny Mtns) if I'm out for a week-long bp (or a long weekend) I could end up with nights where the insulated quilt is needed, followed by a night where I would just want a light covering to keep the chill off.
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Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intent of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, and loudly proclaiming Wow! What a Ride!

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#201285 - 06/29/18 01:21 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: PaHiker]
BZH Offline
member

Registered: 01/26/11
Posts: 901
Loc: Torrance, CA
In those situations, I bring my quilt and stick appendages out until the amount of insulation matches my desires.

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#201286 - 06/29/18 01:25 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: BZH]
PaHiker Offline
member

Registered: 02/12/15
Posts: 125
Loc: Western Pa, USA
Hmm. interesting. Have to think about that. Thanks.
_________________________
Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intent of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, and loudly proclaiming Wow! What a Ride!

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#201287 - 06/29/18 02:11 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: PaHiker]
JustWalking Offline
member

Registered: 01/12/16
Posts: 176
Loc: PNW
Depending on the temp variation, I'd bring a quilt for the mid point (say, if the temp variation was going to be 30-50, I'd bring a 40), and supplement as needed on the colder nights with a down jacket/thermal underwear/etc.

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#201290 - 06/29/18 07:59 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: BZH]
wgiles Offline
member

Registered: 05/19/14
Posts: 154
Loc: Central Illinois near Springfi...
Originally Posted By BZH
You are definitely correct that you don't need insulation under (except for your pad). But...the biggest issue with quilts is heat leaking around the sides as you shift in the night. I think you want some insulation near that interface. A bit of it may get compressed, but it could add some buffer as you shift in the night.


I agree with this and, when you begin to use a quilt, you are going to have to find out what works for you. My main concern is my footbox and covering for my legs. I like to have enough extra to tuck in around my upper body and arms and around my neck. If I'm too warm, I can roll the top down. I usually wear a hooded shirt as part of my sleep suit and use that for insulation when the quilt is too warm.

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#201291 - 06/29/18 08:18 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: wgiles]
PaHiker Offline
member

Registered: 02/12/15
Posts: 125
Loc: Western Pa, USA
I've been going back-end-forth on the foot box thing. I have a camp quilt that I purchased from Campmor, not very insulated, good enough for chilly nights, but not when it starts getting cold. That's why I decided to make a lightly insulated quilt (Apex 3.6), this should take me from the 50's to the 30's with no problem.

The Campmor uses mating ties to close up the bottom and/or side, that way the foot box isn't permanent, so in the warmer temps I can keep it open. Problem is that there are open spots that might let the cold in when the temps drop. I've been tossing the idea of velcro (least favorite, it does wear out), plastic snaps, or a zipper (close the bottom and about a foot of the side).
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Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intent of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, and loudly proclaiming Wow! What a Ride!

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#201292 - 06/30/18 03:26 AM Re: Quilt question [Re: PaHiker]
Bill Kennedy Offline
member

Registered: 02/27/18
Posts: 99
Loc: Portland, Oregon
Ray Jardine's quilt kit contains what he calls a "draftstopper, " which I gather is just a strip of shell material along each side that can be tucked under to prevent drafts. Might be worth considering.

My experiments using a light sleeping bag as a quilt seem to indicate that it's maybe not for me. I always wound up zipping it closed before the night was over. Also, my bald head requires more insulation than a stocking cap.

It seems as though if you make the quilt wide enough to tuck very far under you, you've essentially made a sleeping bag and only saved the weight of the zipper and maybe the hood, although personally I would want the quilt long enough to pull up over my head.

I did make a prototype synthetic quilt similar to Ray Jardine's concept, using materials I had on hand (light nylon taffeta and a single layer of Climashield, which has since lost about half its loft.) I used Jardine's idea of sections of yarn to stabilize the insulation and incorporated his "gorget," which contours the quilt over the chest and shoulder area, a feature I would definitely use again if making another quilt. No footbox, just sewed the end closed and sewed up maybe 18" to make a pocket for my feet. Although I wouldn't use it backpacking except in the warmest climate, it's been very useful at home for taking a nap.
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#201295 - 06/30/18 06:48 AM Re: Quilt question [Re: Bill Kennedy]
BZH Offline
member

Registered: 01/26/11
Posts: 901
Loc: Torrance, CA
I know the feeling of trying out a quilt and thinking, "this is going to be way to drafty." That is the first thought I had when I pulled my EE quilt out of the box. One key I found was snapping and cinching down on the neck. That pulled the quilt around me all the way down my sides to the foot box. Before cinching the neck it was in essence free flowing at the top and felt like a blanket that wasn't wide enough.

You definitely need enough material to tuck underneath you, so you don't get as much weight savings as you might think at first. But they do end up being lighter and less constricting than a normal sleeping bag.

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#201296 - 06/30/18 08:27 AM Re: Quilt question [Re: BZH]
PaHiker Offline
member

Registered: 02/12/15
Posts: 125
Loc: Western Pa, USA
Originally Posted By BZH
I know the feeling of trying out a quilt and thinking, "this is going to be way to drafty." That is the first thought I had when I pulled my EE quilt out of the box. One key I found was snapping and cinching down on the neck. That pulled the quilt around me all the way down my sides to the foot box. Before cinching the neck it was in essence free flowing at the top and felt like a blanket that wasn't wide enough.

You definitely need enough material to tuck underneath you, so you don't get as much weight savings as you might think at first. But they do end up being lighter and less constricting than a normal sleeping bag.



The material I have is all 60" wide (probably 58" after sewing). My thought is that after using it a while if it ends up being to wide (based on how I use it) I can always sew a new edge and cut off the excess.

Some designs show sewing it all together with the eventual outside on the inside (leaving one side open) then pulling it out through the opening and sewing the opening up. On my Campmor everything is just sewn as it will be used with an edge of 1-1/2" grosgrain to finish it off. Trying to decide which way to go, the latter is definitely easier, but then you have the extra weight of the grosgrain.
_________________________
Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intent of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, and loudly proclaiming Wow! What a Ride!

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#201300 - 06/30/18 06:42 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: PaHiker]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6521
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
I toss and turn so much that a quilt doesn't do the job. In fact, I have problems staying warm even at home on my bed because I end up half uncovered (why I sleep in hooded sweatshirts at home). Out in the western mountains, where nights get pretty cool (at times below freezing even in midsummer), I'll stick with my 20* sleeping bag. If the night starts out really warm, I may be on top of the bag, with the zipper undone. During the night I will migrate to inside the bag, zipper still open, but I usually end up zipping up that zipper about 2 am.

Of course, Pennsylvania summers are a different story!


Edited by OregonMouse (06/30/18 06:45 PM)
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#201302 - 06/30/18 06:59 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: OregonMouse]
PaHiker Offline
member

Registered: 02/12/15
Posts: 125
Loc: Western Pa, USA
Like Texas (hiked some there) Pa weather really depends on where you are. I live in what is call the Foothills of the Alleghenies, the difference in temps can be over 10° during the day, more at night, between the foothills and the tops of the mountains. North Central Pa is even more of a difference, and the temps can swing widely from one day to the next. The mountains really do make a difference when it comes to weather and temps.

I've done some hiking in Texas, mostly in the Guadalupe Mtns, very nice country. I was supposed to do some hiking/rafting/riding in Big Bend this year, but health got in the way...maybe next year?
_________________________
Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intent of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, and loudly proclaiming Wow! What a Ride!

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#201315 - 07/01/18 03:22 PM Re: Quilt question [Re: PaHiker]
wgiles Offline
member

Registered: 05/19/14
Posts: 154
Loc: Central Illinois near Springfi...
I have made two quilts from Climashield 5.0. They are both about 80" long and are 60' wide at the top. They taper from 60" to about 45" at the bottom, if I remember correctly. The bottom has a drawstring to form the base of the footbox and the taper has Velcro close the bottom of the footbox. There is a tie strap at the end of the taper to keep from pulling the Velcro open. I find this arrangement quite comfortable and have used it down to around 50F. I am 6 Ft tall and large enough at the hips that I can't pull the zipper closed in a slim taper sleeping bag. I am a side sleeper and move around often at night. I made a Bivy bag that my sleeping pad and quilt fit into nicely and I am quite comfortable. The bivy keeps my sleeping pad and quilt under control, while allowing ventilation and freedom to move. For me, the biggest problem with this setup is bulk. Climashield 5.0 just doesn't compress well. I've got an old Gerry tapered down bag that is a bit too small for me, but works very nicely as a quilt when zipped about halfway. This gets me down to around freezing. I've got another quilt that I made from a Costco Packable Down Throw. These things were cheap and plentiful for a while and only weigh around a pound. They are sewn through construction and not the best for cold conditions. They make a great inner liner, though. At 60" X 70" they are a bit short, but plenty wide.

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