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#119959 - 08/27/09 09:40 AM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: OregonMouse]
chimpac Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 148
Loc: alberta,can.
In case you hadn't noticed, this is a lightweight backpacking site.

What is the maximum weight allowed for a stove to be on this Church of the Lite site.

To keep cults from preaching the rules should be posted. The way I calculate it I may

not be as heretical as you think unless using heat inside a shelter to get dry is

against all principles of righteousness.

windscreen,stove, fuel and containter total weight vs. 2lb. stove and chimney.

Maybe I can use titanium and become worthy.

What would be the penance or penalty for those who convert to be a chimney carrying heretic.


Edited by chimpac (08/27/09 09:55 AM)

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#119963 - 08/27/09 10:12 AM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: chimpac]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
I have very little respect for someone who shows up in forums - online communities - and spends just about every post they make trying to convince someone to buy into something they are trying to sell. I for one refuse to buy items from people who do this, even if I was interested in the item itself. It may not be overt spam, but it's freakin' annoying.

Especially when you get all sanctimonious when someone calls you on it. Spam is spam, Sam I am, and you have earned my "ignore" hammer.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

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#119964 - 08/27/09 10:19 AM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: chimpac]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6764
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
My stove (isobutane canister) weighs 3.5 oz. and a small fuel canister (enough for a week for me) is 8.1 oz. Total stove weight with fuel is 11.6 oz. A lot of people think my option is too heavy! If I switched to using alcohol as a fuel, the stove plus windscreen would weigh half as much but the fuel plus container for a week would probably be close to the same (the weight advantages of alcohol stoves disappear with longer trips because the fuel is a bit heavier). I've been considering a switch, but the canister stove is so convenient that I probably won't.

I've already noted that using wood for fuel is definitely not an option and is, in fact, illegal in the Rockies and in the Cascades near or at timberline, where I prefer to backpack. Even if fires aren't prohibited due to high fire danger (an annual event in Pacific Northwest summers), there isn't enough fuel at those altitudes to allow campers to build even small fires without stripping the place of its last dry twig (unfortunately common in more popular spots).

Silicone-coated nylon tents or tarps, which most of us use because they are considerably lighter than their urethane-coated counterparts, are also not flame-resistant, so using a wood stove inside would be highly dangerous.

A wood stove is practical only for those who, in winter, use pulks (sleds) to haul their stuff, or for horse packers.

If you want to carry a 50-60 pound pack, go for it. Most of us prefer to carry half that weight or less and be far more comfortable. Some of us (me included) physically cannot carry such loads. In fact, I had to give up backpacking altogether after a knee injury, until I discovered lightweight gear, mostly thanks to this site. Try going lighter, you'll like it!

Are you here on this forum only to disparage those who don't buy your products?
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May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

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#119968 - 08/27/09 10:39 AM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: chimpac]
Keith Offline
member

Registered: 01/04/02
Posts: 1667
Loc: Michigan's Upper Peninsula
Originally Posted By chimpac
In case you hadn't noticed, this is a lightweight backpacking site.

What is the maximum weight allowed for a stove to be on this Church of the Lite site.

To keep cults from preaching the rules should be posted. The way I calculate it I may

not be as heretical as you think unless using heat inside a shelter to get dry is

against all principles of righteousness.

windscreen,stove, fuel and containter total weight vs. 2lb. stove and chimney.

Maybe I can use titanium and become worthy.

What would be the penance or penalty for those who convert to be a chimney carrying heretic.


You see, what we have never heard from you is "Oh,yeah, you're right, my stove/chimney would not be appropriate in (national parks, alpine zones, etc). It would be nice to have a rational conversation with you in regard to the advantages AND LIMITATIONS of your approach. (I hope you are aware that you are not the first to think of this approach or speak of it on this forum.)

Since you appear to be either incapable or unwilling to recognize that there are always tradeoffs with any solution (and people who make different choices are not being willfully stupid but usually have a legitimate basis for their decision), it is extremely difficult to trust your comments because they certainly fit all the criteria of shameless marketing -- whether that is your intent or not.

Hey, I've been interested in the tent stove idea ever since looking at the Titanium Goat stuff and would be interested in a reasoned discussion of the topic. I'd even be interested in hearing a shameless marketing plug comparing your product to others already in that market space. However your approach here so far makes it difficult for me to rely on the value of your words -- much less consider buying a product from you.
_________________________
Human Resources Memo: Floggings will continue until morale improves.

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#119971 - 08/27/09 10:52 AM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: chimpac]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
Hey a stove under a tarp makes sense...some times. I saw your posts in the canadian winter trekking forum that Tomd loves so much (I don't blame him, I like it too, although I am only a lurker). That forum is for people who winter camp in a place that is extremely cold with no fire ban and lots of wood. Since they drag all their stuff on sleds, lighter is better, and carrying a 2 lb stove instead of a 10 lb stove is genius. You also posted about the stove in a wilderness survival forum. It makes sense there as well. In fact, if you would have posted about your stove on this site in the winter camping area, it would be a good fit for some. But, you fail to realize that it is not a good fit for most of the people on this site, especially when they only 3 season hike. 3 season in the lower 48 is a lot different than 3 season in Alberta. Also, a lot of people in the lower 48 can't have a fire (we call it a fire ban), even if it is in a stove. And, when you combine warm weather, fire ban and the lightweight hiking style, a 2 lb stove that you can't use seems a little much. But, with all that said, those things don't raise any suspicions. I meet people every day that can't see past their own nose. They always think they have the greatest thing and no one comes close. They usually can't take criticism. No big deal. What get's me is that you only want to talk about your stove, but not completely. You first put a post describing it with some tiny pictures that show no detail, then add a lengthy description of its features with no pictures. There is always a reference to google chimpac for other forums. But, in those other forums, it is the exact post, word for word. No additional information. Even in a forum with people that are truly at awe with it. So, why don't you want to show people how to make it? Why not make a how-to post with detailed instructions? Seems to me that you want to sell them and you are prepping the market for them. Fishy, very fishy.
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I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.

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#119973 - 08/27/09 11:36 AM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: chimpac]
Echterling Offline
member

Registered: 08/21/09
Posts: 52
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By chimpac


windscreen,stove, fuel and containter total weight vs. 2lb. stove and chimney.


To be completely fair, what is the weight of the wood I would have to carry for 1 week. You included fuel on one side of the equation, you need to include it on the other side too.

Yes, I'm serious, I'm usually in places with zero burnable material (high altitude deserts and mountains).
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#119995 - 08/27/09 05:51 PM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: dash4689]
wandering_daisy Offline
member

Registered: 01/11/06
Posts: 2865
Loc: California
I do not dry ANYTHING in my small tent. My priority is keeping my sleeping bag dry and I do not want any extra humidity. I wring out wet stuff and put it all in a stuff sack set in the vestibule. Wet shoes also are under the vestibule. Only dry stuff comes inside the tent. I put on wet stuff for hiking - after a few minutes of misery, it gets warm when you walk. If you wear wool and wring it out good, it really is not that bad.

Have you tried hanging the raingear on the inner branches of a tree overnight? I do this often and although it never really dries, it ends up only damp in the morning. If you have the right kind of trees, there are small spots within the tree that never get wet.

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#120077 - 08/30/09 12:32 PM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: dash4689]
chimpac Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 148
Loc: alberta,can.
I do have a one track mind or obsession. I am slow on the

computer and neglect to post personal comments when they

should be made. I have some comments now to make a few points

clear. Its about the chimney joint, a tapered sleeve butt

joint. Tapered chimney sections made with light metal are not

strong enough when joined the conventional way.

Using the new joint, a chimney is strong enough to be

centerpole and hold a mounted stove.

I have patent pending on the joint feature.

A titanium centerpole chimney (near 10oz.) could be used to vent a gas stove.


I am only building and testing right now and looking for

anything out there that is better.

Thankyou to the judges of equipment on the forum for the

encouragement and constructive criticism.

I recognize the need for a chimney is disputed. I am a

backcountry traveller also and would feel deprived if I had

to use a shelter without a chimney.


Edited by chimpac (08/30/09 12:53 PM)
Edit Reason: add a few words

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#120127 - 08/31/09 06:36 PM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: chimpac]
ringtail Offline
member

Registered: 08/22/02
Posts: 2296
Loc: Colorado Rockies
A wood burning stove in a tent is fun for a base/hunters camp. When I am moving camp each day I prefer a different shelter. I avoid using my Kifaru because it requires so many stakes-- just a high fiddle factor.

Kifaru and TiGoat both have good wood burning stoves for tents.
_________________________
"In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are not."
Yogi Berra

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#120129 - 08/31/09 07:35 PM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: chimpac]
Keith Offline
member

Registered: 01/04/02
Posts: 1667
Loc: Michigan's Upper Peninsula
Originally Posted By chimpac
I do have a one track mind or obsession. I am slow on the computer and neglect to post personal comments when they should be made.
I have patent pending on the joint feature.
I am only building and testing right now and looking for anything out there that is better.
Thankyou to the judges of equipment on the forum for the encouragement and constructive criticism.
I recognize the need for a chimney is disputed. I am a backcountry traveller also and would feel deprived if I had to use a shelter without a chimney.


Thanks for the post. It really helps to know where you are coming from. I wish you the best in your patent process.
_________________________
Human Resources Memo: Floggings will continue until morale improves.

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#120563 - 09/08/09 07:38 PM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: ringtail]
chimpac Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 148
Loc: alberta,can.
Originally Posted By food
A wood burning stove in a tent is fun for a base/hunters camp. When I am moving camp each day I prefer a different shelter. I avoid using my Kifaru because it requires so many stakes-- just a high fiddle factor.

Kifaru and TiGoat both have good wood burning stoves for tents.


The stoves mentioned above are horizontal stoves which are not

capable of burning wood very slowly from the top down like

vertical gassifier type stoves. A slow hot steady heat is

needed for cooking, burning first the gas out of the wood

then burning all the charcoal that is formed by changing

the draft to only come in under the grate the charcoal is

sitting on.


Edited by chimpac (09/08/09 10:24 PM)

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#120575 - 09/08/09 10:11 PM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: Echterling]
Steven Offline
member

Registered: 08/25/09
Posts: 24
Loc: United States
Going back to the drying the gear idea, why keep it in the tent at all. The original post suggested his tent didn't have a vestibule. Why not make one with a garbage bag. Dry the wet gear with your towel, and keep it under your garbage bag vestibule. So what if the rain coat doesn't get completely dry. Just getting some air on it will help and you really didn't want that extra moisture in the tent to begin with.
_________________________
Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation. It is better to be alone than in bad company.
George Washington

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#120680 - 09/10/09 08:39 PM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: wandering_daisy]
BorealHiker Offline
member

Registered: 02/02/08
Posts: 75
Loc: The Third Maine
That is correct about certain kinds of trees, conifers mostly, and spruce or fir especially. I know this well, but hadn't thought of it, I dare to admit. So thanks!

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#120685 - 09/10/09 10:51 PM Re: How to dry rain gear in a small tent. [Re: Steven]
Franco Offline
member

Registered: 04/05/04
Posts: 1010
Loc: Australia
"The original post suggested his tent didn't have a vestibule"
The tent in question is the TT Scarp 1 , one of the few singles to have TWO vestibules...
If you look at my picture, the "clothes line would be hanging on the outside of the inner (folded in so that you can see the set up...)
Obviously for anything to happen you need some air movement, a still rainy night is not going to dry those bits apart from the drip/dry bit. Still, better than nothing.
Franco

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