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#86674 - 01/09/08 10:48 PM The 'Perfect' Jacket...
jasonlivy Offline
member

Registered: 01/02/04
Posts: 654
Loc: Colorado
What features would you like in your 'perfect' jacket (pockets, zippers, weights, hood, iPod compatible, durability, packability, length, size, etc.)?

This jacket can be a softshell, hardshell, windshirt, hybrid (combination hardshell/softshell), etc.
_________________________
Believe, then you will Understand...

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#86675 - 01/09/08 11:58 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
febbom Offline
member

Registered: 10/05/02
Posts: 164
For a jacket that I would use %80 of the time for climbing and winter backpacking:

-Take the design (fit and features) of an Arcteryx Gamma MX Hoody- add a few inches to the hem. Redesign the cuffs so they do not wear out in 2 years. Possibly add more fabric to elbow and lower arm/ yoke for durability. Get rid of the sleeve pocket and maybe one chest pocket.

-Use fabric similar to Patagonia's Ready Mix material, but actually make it stretch and make it durable. Keep the quick drying, wind resistance and light weight.

- Use Arcteryx colors (deep brown and burgundy)

Given this, essentical features are:

Above a harness hand pockets, at least one chest pocket, long arms, long hem, helmet compatible hood for people with big heads. Ultra breathable, but windproof, fast drying and tough.

Come in around 14 ounces, and under $250.

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#86676 - 01/10/08 12:41 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: febbom]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6400
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
I really like the Montbell Thermawrap jacket. Very light (women's M is 8.0 oz. with stuff sack, several ounces lighter than my Polartec 200 fleece) and very warm, and it has nice handwarmer pockets! It also packs to about the size of a baseball, much smaller than my fleece. It does tend to run small, though--I probably should have gotten a large instead of a medium--the medium is a pretty snug fit.

I also like fleece, which is more breathable under an outer hard-shell layer. Sometimes I'm hard put to it to decide which to bring! In summer, I take the fleece jacket. If it's going to be colder (fall/spring or really high altitude, such as in the Rockies), I go with the Thermawrap.

My one beef is that I'd like any jacket to cover my hips. That's where I get the coldest! There have been a number of times on really cold nights that a pair of fleece shorts would have been wonderful! I've never been able to find anything to do the job. I might just get a pair of Campmor microfleece pants and cut the legs off just above the knees for late fall/early spring camping!

I'd also like to have a microfleece vest, but with very short sleeves. In the past I have had occasional bouts of arthritis in my shoulder joints, so I need to have my shoulder joints covered, even if just a couple of inches down my arms. I could buy something with sleeves and cut them off. Or I might just get a baselayer short-sleeved T-shirt as an additional layer. The T-shirt would be lighter and would fit better under my Montbell Thermawrap.

For safety reasons, I prefer synthetic insulation for outer clothing because I have a down sleeping bag. Should the bag ever get wet (something I work extra hard to prevent), the synthetic clothing is a backup. If all my insulation were down, there could be potential trouble should everything get wet.

Your Mileage May Vary!
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

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#86677 - 01/10/08 05:27 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
Paddy_Crow Offline
member

Registered: 11/08/04
Posts: 2285
Loc: Michigan
There's no such thing, that's why I have a closet full of them.

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#86678 - 01/10/08 08:18 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket/perfect bottom shorts [Re: OregonMouse]
sabre11004 Offline
member

Registered: 05/05/07
Posts: 513
Loc: Tennessee


Campmor.com has their 200 PolarTec for men and women (bottoms) on sale ($20.00) right now. You should be able to cut the legs off at that price I would think... They would make great shorts like you are talking about...sabre11004...

The first step that you take will be one of those that get you there.... <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />


Edited by sabre11004 (01/10/08 08:19 AM)
_________________________
The first step that you take will be one of those that get you there 1!!!!!

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#86679 - 01/10/08 08:31 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
Ben2World Offline
member

Registered: 10/26/04
Posts: 1754
Loc: So Cal
I am unimpressed with softshells. They are heavy and they provide only 80% protection. While that might be all that's needed for a three-season day trip or in-town wear, it's neither good nor light nor compact enough for my multi-day hikes. Until they come up with a 100% rainproof, windproof and true high breathability jacket that's as light and compact as my current shell and insulation jackets combined... I'll stick to the flexibility of two separate pieces:

Perfect hardshell -- eVENT with pit zips, stowaway adjustable hood, and hand pockets -- weighing 10 oz. or less. Or a Driducks with high tear strength.

Perfect insulation -- a synthetic jacket that approaches 800fp in weight and compactness for the same warmth.

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#86680 - 01/10/08 08:55 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
JAK Offline
member

Registered: 03/19/04
Posts: 2569
Quote:
What features would you like in your 'perfect' jacket (pockets, zippers, weights, hood, iPod compatible, durability, packability, length, size, etc.)?

This jacket can be a softshell, hardshell, windshirt, hybrid (combination hardshell/softshell), etc.
cheap light nylon

My current one is very nice.
4oz, 1/4 zip pullover type, elastic sleeves and skirt. It has a pocket on the side, kidney area. Very handy but two pockets would have been better. Stomach pouches are good also. I got a large for $20 and an xxlarge for $12. LLBean factory outlet store in Bangor 6-7 months ago.

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#86681 - 01/10/08 09:33 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
Paddy_Crow Offline
member

Registered: 11/08/04
Posts: 2285
Loc: Michigan
Actually, I'm hoping Patagonia makes a jacket/pullover out of the same material as their Cold Track Light Pants. I got them from Moosejaw with a nice discount.

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#86682 - 01/10/08 10:40 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
ringtail Offline
member

Registered: 08/22/02
Posts: 2296
Loc: Colorado Rockies
Hard shell because I fall in the snow often.

Pullover Anorak with:
zippered chest pocket
tunnel hand pockets
hem drawcord

Fabric ? Breathable and windproof is important. I wear a jacket in the winter and a poncho for 3 season so waterproof is not important.

Limits:

Weight: I can carry both a GoLite Ether and a Sierra Designs anorak for less than 13 oz.

Cost: The combined cost of the above on sale was less than $100.

A more technical jacket is needed when you encounter mixed conditions. That could be either traveling Liberty Ridge route on Rainier or in and out of stores shopping.


Edited by food (01/10/08 10:41 AM)

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#86683 - 01/10/08 11:03 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
Trailrunner Offline
member

Registered: 01/05/02
Posts: 1835
Loc: Los Angeles
I'm with Paddy. Everything is a compromise. You have to pick a jacket for the conditions. Rainy? You want a hardshell. Bushwhacking? You want durable. Cold? You want lots of insulation. So for me there is no perfect jacket. Maybe perfect for a particular trip but that's all.
_________________________
If you only travel on sunny days you will never reach your destination.*

* May not apply at certain latitudes in Canada and elsewhere.

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#86684 - 01/10/08 11:56 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: Trailrunner]
Rick_D Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/02
Posts: 2802
Loc: NorCal
Yup, different places, conditions, times of year, length of trip, size of pack all call for different clothing "tools."

Probably the only jacket I carry 12 months/year is a 3oz Patagonia windshirt. All else is selected based on the variables above.

I found that once I abandoned the search for a do-all garment, I was a lot happier with what was available. Zipout linings and the like aren't well-suited to lightweight travel.
Quote:
I'm with Paddy. Everything is a compromise. You have to pick a jacket for the conditions. Rainy? You want a hardshell. Bushwhacking? You want durable. Cold? You want lots of insulation. So for me there is no perfect jacket. Maybe perfect for a particular trip but that's all.
_________________________
--Rick

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#86685 - 01/10/08 12:18 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
Carter Offline
member

Registered: 01/05/02
Posts: 355
Loc: Missoula, MT
For a winter soft shell:

Take the third generation Patagonia Dimension (with the welded seams and no elastic on the cuffs), but use the second generation Dimension fabric (which was heavier and more abrasion resistant than the third generation all poly material). Keep the inner zipped pocket, but also add a drop-in mesh water bottle pocket on the interior. For the hood, use a wire stiffener (as Patagonia once did, and many UK jackets still have).

For a summer waterproof shell:

Take the Arc'Teryx Sirrus SL, but change the material from a PacLite/XCR combo to eVent. Replace the one Napoleon pocket with two mesh-backed full size pockets. Add a wire stiffener to the hood brim.

For an expedition shell:

Take the Patagonia Ice Nine, but make it with Gore Pro Shell and use welded seams. Add a zippered inner pocket to complement the mesh drop-in pocket on the inside. Make the waist drawcord cinch only the front (so there's no cord to rub against a pack). Use the hood adjustment system from the Patagonia Dimension jacket. Add a wire stiffener to the hood brim. Perhaps include D-rings on the sleeves to attach the keeper loops of gloves.

What I don't need: lipstick pockets on the arms, inner powder skirts, hoods that hide away, or anything to do with iPods.

Make sure the pockets are large enough to hold skins or a trade-sized paperback, and that Napoleon pockets are large enough for sunglasses in a case. Test to ensure that the pockets can be opened and closed when you're sitting (surprisingly, many jackets don't have this capability).

Pay attention to the hood design, and especially how it fits over a helmet. Offset the main zipper so that it doesn't chafe your throat.

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#86686 - 01/10/08 04:05 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: Carter]
Ben2World Offline
member

Registered: 10/26/04
Posts: 1754
Loc: So Cal
Hey -- I want a "rollaway / hideaway" hood!!!

Many times, when it's not raining too hard, I prefer to leave my hood off. But without a rollaway hood, water can accumulate into a puddle -- not good when rain suddenly goes wild and you quickly put on the hood as a reflex! <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif" alt="" />

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#86687 - 01/10/08 06:19 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: Ben2World]
jshannon Offline
member

Registered: 02/14/06
Posts: 410
Loc: North Texas
All you have to do is tuck it into the jacket neck.
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Ten Essential Groups

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#86688 - 01/10/08 06:50 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
Trailrunner Offline
member

Registered: 01/05/02
Posts: 1835
Loc: Los Angeles
My other post didn't really answer the question so in the spirit of the thread I'll list some features I really like, though not necessarily all in the same jacket:

* Big, zippered handwarmer pockets, preferably with mesh linings. They keep my hands warm, provide storage and also provide ventilation. I have only one jacket without them and they are sorely missed.

* A full zipper.

* A BIG zippered center pocket near the bottom. My Driclime jacket has one in back and I love it. Perfect for short dayhikes from camp.

* A high collar.

* On a heavier jacket an insulated hood. So much warmer than just a hat. No gap between jacket and headgear. But please no visor.

* Velcro has its place but IMO not on a jacket. It wears out. It freezes up. Give me zippers.
_________________________
If you only travel on sunny days you will never reach your destination.*

* May not apply at certain latitudes in Canada and elsewhere.

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#86689 - 01/10/08 10:12 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
billk Offline
member

Registered: 08/20/03
Posts: 1196
Loc: Portland, Oregon
Rain Jacket:

Like the Marmot Precip anorak, but full zip, and with pocket liners made of fabric instead of mesh.

Insulated Jacket:

The Montbell Alpine Light jacket is close to ideal for me, for 3-season use. If I were re-designing it, I'd give it a hood, but not as large a hood as the Alpine Light Parka. I'd also either add zippers to the handwarmer pockets, or some insulation in the lining side of the pockets.

Wind Jacket:

I have a Marmot Driclime wind jacket (as opposed to the windshirt) and, to my surprise, I find that it's worth taking in addition to a rain shell. It needs a hood, too, though. I mean, it's supposed to be a wind jacket!

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#86690 - 01/11/08 07:21 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
Carter Offline
member

Registered: 01/05/02
Posts: 355
Loc: Missoula, MT
I'll add to my previous comments.

Hoods:

Not many hoods actually turn with the head. Surprisingly, one of the best examples is on the Teva eVent jacket. Some stretch in the back of the neck area is also good for quickly lowering the hood without having to loosen all the adjustements. Also, many hoods have decidedly floppy brims. Arc'Teryx is probably the best of the North American-designed brands, but I much prefer the UK tradition of having a wire stiffened brim.

Cuffs:

The recent trend to eliminate elastic from cuffs produces a lighter, more durable, and quicker drying garment, but it also makes for a looser seal. The move to hard Velcro tabs makes it easier to grab the adjuster, and should be continued. My biggest complaint with most jackets is that the cuff openings aren't wide enough to provide effective ventilation--or allow for one to push the cuffs up to the elbows.

Chest Pockets:

Having large pockets with wide openings is essential, but little thought seems to be given to how easy they are to open/close when the wearer is seated--the material billows out, forcing the zipper to take a curved shape away from the body. The best chest pocket design I know of is found on some Arc'Teryx jackets and the old Patagonia Torre: straight zips into pleated pockets. The pleats allow for expansion of the pocket without using excess fabric.

Drawcords:

I vastly prefer hem and hood adjustments that are accessed through the pockets, leaving no cords to whap you in the face or get caught on ice axes, ski poles, or chairlifts. The foam adjusters that Patagonia uses on hood drawcords are brilliant--light weight, soft, and with no moving parts to break, but still easy to use.

Welded (More Precisely Glued) Seams:

Should be encouraged--they make the garments lighter, stronger, sleeker, and probably more waterproof.

Fabric Reinforcements:

Many times, the heavier fabric meant to increase durability isn't positioned correctly--for example, it doesn't cover your elbow when your arm is fully flexed.

Velcro:

Older jackets used too much of it. Marmot parkas had immensely wide strips on the cuffs that would always catch on the Velcro of the main zipper flaps. A friend of mine with long hair removed all the Velcro from the main zipper flap of her older Patagonia Storm Jacket--that full length strip was always catching on her hair. The trend to recessed Velcro (such as used by Patagonia) is nice.

Then there are some recent trends that I like:

Heated Jackets.

People pointed out the obscenely high price of the TNF/Polartec electrically heated soft shell, but I think it made a lot of sense for one-day activities such as ice climbing or downhill skiing. What's needed is to bring the cost down while ensuring that the heating strands and battery attachment remain durable.

Reflective/Glow in the Dark Fabrics.

Patagonia once had some jackets that had reflective patches that were basically the same color as the rest of the jacket during the day, but became reflective when hit by a light. And didn't Marmot make a jacket that glowed in the dark? Such a capability might seem weird, but the ability to been seen is very useful for night bike riding or after dark rescues.

Game Pouches/Big Back Pockets.

One of the great features of the old Sierra Designs 60/40 parka was the big pocket in the back that allowed you to store a lot of junk between the liner and the exterior of the jacket--often times eliminating the need to wear a pack. The trick here would be to make it so the two layers didn't inhibit breathability and ensuring that the opening was waterproof.

Velcro Accessory Attachments.

You may have noticed that a lot of military outerwear now features Velcro patches all over the place to attach nametags, unit patches, etc. (check the listing for Patagonia military windshirts on eBay for an example). What if your jacket had that so that when you want pockets, you could have them (like a clear pocket on the sleeve to hold a ski pass), then take them off when they're redundant.

Recyclable Materials.

Not only make more stuff out of recycled material, but make sure that you have a process to get the material back from the user to the recycling plant.

For the Future.

How about clothing that could change color (I believe the military is experimenting with this now)? Bright orange when you're in a white out, a muted green when you want to be visually quiet.

Or radical phase change barriers that reacted instantly to changes in temperature/humidty? The pores would open extremely wide for breathability, or could shut down to next to nothing for windproofness/rain protection. Maybe this could be manually over-ridden with a user operated control.

Then what if you could have a garment that had two or more pieces that could be mixed and matched. Let's say a very durable outer, a lighter but still windproof outer, and a WP/B liner. You could then have two softshells and two hardshells with just three pieces. I'd try to find a way to attach the liner in a way that didn't require zippers, Velcro, or snaps--perhaps a temporary adhesive that would make the liner fit as well (and as close) as the tricot scrim on three layer jackets does today.

How about WP/B barriers that use something other than Silicone, Teflon, or Poly this and that? Enzymes perhaps?

And maybe self-healing materials. If the garment is cut or abraded, it would grow back. Or you could dial in the fabric thickness you wanted (for abrasion resistance let's say), and then rub it off until next time. Or when you're terribly hot, slice a new vent and then close it up whenever you want.

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#86691 - 01/11/08 07:44 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
jasonlivy Offline
member

Registered: 01/02/04
Posts: 654
Loc: Colorado
Thanks for all the comments! I am planning on taking these ideas and presenting them to the guys at Westcomb. Granted, they are going to do their own thing, but they do take these ideas seriously. I can't think of a better forum to get ideas and opinions for the perfect jacket than here!
_________________________
Believe, then you will Understand...

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#86692 - 01/11/08 08:04 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
Earthling Offline
member

Registered: 02/22/03
Posts: 3228
Loc: USA
What Carter said! You tell 'em Jason that we all collectively sent ya' <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" /> If they come knockin' we'll be here to start the buying <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />
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#86693 - 01/12/08 06:17 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: Carter]
Paddy_Crow Offline
member

Registered: 11/08/04
Posts: 2285
Loc: Michigan
I'm going to be a bit of a contrarian on a couple items...

Hoods- I hate them. I prefer a hat and neck gaiter combination when it's cold enough to be required. The only exception is on my rain jacket where I think it is required (no other way to keep rain from running down the neck).

Sleeve closures- I hate velcro straps, especially the plastic strips that Patagonia sometimes uses. They just aren't comfortable. Not a fan of zippers, either. I tend to like good old elastic, you can put the jacket on and take it off without having to fiddle with the sleeves.

Velcro accessory patches- If it couldn't be easily removed, I probably wouldn't buy such a jacket. For one, it's not secure enough. I'd worry about things falling off and I would consider it to be unnecessary weight.

Pockets- I agree about hand warmer pockets that also function as vents.

Stretch- I would like to see a lighter jacket (under 10 ounces) that fits fairly close, but has a lot of mechanical stretch. I'm not a big fan of the lightweight, loose fitting jackets that have limited stretch. They snag on things and flap in the breeze. As I said in an earlier post, the 4.6 ounce fabric (88% polyester, 12% spandex) that Patagonia uses on their Cold Track Light pants is what I'm looking for.

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#86694 - 01/12/08 03:29 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: Ben2World]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6400
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
I deliberately left out the hard shell (which would go over my Montbell Thermawarp or fleece if it's both cold and raining). The absolutely perfect hard shell, of course, would be 100% waterproof in an all-day downpour but still extremely breathable at 65 degrees. It would also have to weigh 12 oz. or less for rain jacket and pants combined. I don't believe such a thing yet exists--I certainly haven't found it. So in mild weather I take my Frogg Toggs jacket (which is very breathable and holds up to at least a couple hours of rain). For colder, wetter conditions I recently acquired a Brawny jacket and pants from AntiGravity Gear, which (since they're not breathable) I bought in a large size for more ventilation. Neither is perfect, but at least they're light. Actually, if the temp is 65 or higher, I've found it's better to strip down to nylon shirt and pants (which dry very fast) and just get wet, wearing gaiters to keep the water from running inside my boots.
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

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#86695 - 01/18/08 04:35 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: Carter]
Woubeir Offline
member

Registered: 03/24/06
Posts: 22
Just to add a few more points to the suggestions already made by Carter

Quote:

Hoods:
Not many hoods actually turn with the head. Surprisingly, one of the best examples is on the Teva eVent jacket. Some stretch in the back of the neck area is also good for quickly lowering the hood without having to loosen all the adjustements. Also, many hoods have decidedly floppy brims. Arc'Teryx is probably the best of the North American-designed brands, but I much prefer the UK tradition of having a wire stiffened brim.

I agree with the wire but it should be made in such a way that you don't have to shape it first. I've seen wired hoods which need shaping after having been stowed in a pack to get the correct archlike shape of the brim. Also, Arc'teryx used to include some sort of fabric stiffener in its hoods. Unfortunately, they don't do that anymore but a combination of a wired and stiffened brim seems ideal to prevent floppy constructions.
Also, I like something like the Arc'teryx speed hood system with adjustment only at the back of your head and with no adjustment in front of your face. I also prefer the Arc'teryx storm hood design like used in their Alpha shells because it offers better coverage and protection.


Quote:

Cuffs:
The recent trend to eliminate elastic from cuffs produces a lighter, more durable, and quicker drying garment, but it also makes for a looser seal. The move to hard Velcro tabs makes it easier to grab the adjuster, and should be continued. My biggest complaint with most jackets is that the cuff openings aren't wide enough to provide effective ventilation--or allow for one to push the cuffs up to the elbows.

Extra features next to the hard velcro cuffs and wide cuff openings could be a little bit of mechanical stretch and a slight assymetrical cuff design that gives a bit more coverage a the back of the wrist.

Quote:

Chest Pockets:
Having large pockets with wide openings is essential, but little thought seems to be given to how easy they are to open/close when the wearer is seated--the material billows out, forcing the zipper to take a curved shape away from the body. The best chest pocket design I know of is found on some Arc'Teryx jackets and the old Patagonia Torre: straight zips into pleated pockets. The pleats allow for expansion of the pocket without using excess fabric..

pockets should be lined with a lightweight, very breathable but still somewhat weatherresistant material (e.g. stretch woven fabric).

Quote:

Drawcords:
I vastly prefer hem and hood adjustments that are accessed through the pockets, leaving no cords to whap you in the face or get caught on ice axes, ski poles, or chairlifts. The foam adjusters that Patagonia uses on hood drawcords are brilliant--light weight, soft, and with no moving parts to break, but still easy to use.

if no pockets are available, I prefer the hem adjustment to be positioned next to the zipper like in the Arc'teryx Sirrus SL.


Further:
* fluid running waterepellent/waterproof zips to dispense with the need for flaps and with zipper pockets.
* articulated sleeve design to prevent rising up of the jacket. Sleeves shoudl be long enough.
* 3D design using the least possible number of panels, still giving an excellent fit while minimising the number of seams
* very narrow seam tollerances, making very narrow seam taping possible or even no seam taping at all in case of certain welding methods
* fabric: something like eVENT or better
* really durable water repellency (perhaps something like the Ion mask treatment or the treatment developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory) which keeps on working after days and weeks of rain.
* the light and abrasion resistant (stretch) woven lining like used in the Gore Pro Shell jackets
* face fabrics which are really hydrophobic in nature unlike nylon. If possible with some mechanical stretch if that doesn't have a negative impact on other performance factors.
* ventilation openings that can be opened with one hand
* lightweight (10 oz. range)

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#86696 - 01/18/08 08:32 AM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
Kate Offline
member

Registered: 01/14/08
Posts: 45
Loc: On top of the North Downs, UK
There is no one perfect jacket. My perfect jacket is not your perfect jacket, and my choices would be different in summer and winter. On a cold damp day in England, blasted by winds from the North Pole and Siberia here on top of the North Downs, I'll go for something warm and snuggly, like staying in and hibernating under a quilt with a cat and a good book! <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif" alt="" />

If I HAVE to go out, I'd like my jacket to be warm, wind proof, rain resistant, draft proof, long enough to keep at least my bum and thighs warm, and light! A couple of easily accessible pockets on the outside and a secure inside pocket will do fine... And it must not rustle! A taffeta ball gown may rustles, but not a coat!

I prefer hats to hoods.

It's got to look equally good in the west End of London going to the theatre and out on the North Downs Way! I'm making one of these out of Polartec Windbloc for Big Sis: http://www.rockywoods.com/Patterns/1005.htm We'll see how it behaves before I do mine.

The Boy will be making one of these: http://www.shelby.fi/catalog/images/104_drawing.jpg I thought it would be simple enough for a 13 YO bloke to make...

The one for the hubby will be a 'design-it-myself' job as he wants a number of special features that I cannot find in a commercial pattern. Damned good excuse for some more pattern drafting software, methinks!
_________________________
Kate XXXXXX
Mad sewing witch!
http://www.katedicey.co.uk

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#86697 - 01/18/08 01:28 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: Kate]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
Quote:
Damned good excuse for some more pattern drafting software, methinks!


So, since you brought it up, what is a good program for this?
_________________________
I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.

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#86698 - 01/18/08 02:57 PM Re: The 'Perfect' Jacket... [Re: jasonlivy]
hootyhoo Offline
member

Registered: 12/14/06
Posts: 686
Loc: Cyberspace
Easy zippers, comfortable neck lining, light, fairly durable, LNT colors, pit zips or some vent method,
What is an ipod? Is that the little alligator that they used to put on golf shirts?

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