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    #82545 - 11/06/07 07:34 PM Native gear
    Jimshaw Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/22/03
    Posts: 3938
    Loc: Bend, Oregon
    Hey Old Dudes <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

    I think you guys will understand this. It seems that after spending half a century camping and climbing it all kinda seems so second nature, and my wife doesn't even notice that I still solo climb, like "well hes a big boy and knows what hes doing". You have to do something different just to make it fun. A friend of mine is into the old time reenactment stuff with buckskin and such.

    I'm about 1/6 native american and sometimes I like to kinda think like a primative and only carry things that my ancesters may have had, with the understanding that I do not have a horse and a travis so I can't carry clay or woven pots and I don't have time to live off the land. But anyway here is some of my Native camping gear. Oh and sometimes I carry a small kit and make an arrowhead while camping.

    Jim <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />


    Heres a scallop shell spoon on the end of a pair of koa chopsticks, an obsidian knife and a roll of leather thong for hanging my deer in a tree. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" /> and a snake skin head band to hold my feather.

    What are you laughing at? They knew a heck of a lot more about living out in nature than any of us... <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />



    Theres an obsidian "pocket knife" and a bird point.
    _________________________
    These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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    #82546 - 11/06/07 08:49 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    Dryer Offline
    Moderator

    Registered: 12/05/02
    Posts: 3571
    Loc: Texas
    "What are you laughing at?"


    Not laughing at all!!! I take this VERY serious and really appreciate you posting this! I, and my wife, have a large share of native blood running through us and my wife is directly related to the cattle drive pioneers of early Texas (Goodnight/Loving Trail fame). I personally think our love of the outdoors is instinctive from these ties. Thank you, Jimshaw, thats interesting, and yes, us 'old dudes' do understand...I've tried to flake a point or two myself... <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif" alt="" /> (note the word "tried")


    Edited by Dryer (11/07/07 04:39 AM)
    _________________________
    paul, texas KD5IVP

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    #82547 - 11/07/07 04:45 AM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    Pika Offline
    member

    Registered: 12/08/05
    Posts: 1736
    Loc: Rural Southeast Arizona
    Jim, great photos. I admire your ability with flint and obsidian; any time I have tried chipping, I removed more finger than I did stone.
    _________________________
    May I walk in beauty.

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    #82548 - 11/07/07 05:59 AM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    6brnorma Offline
    member

    Registered: 05/11/05
    Posts: 252
    Loc: Arizona
    Jim, I can't hit the 'broadside' of a barn if I'm on the inside with all the doors closed even with modern equipment so I'm wondering if you have become proficient with the 'bird point'. Doesn't look like an easy task...gives you a health respect for the folks that had to depend on them.

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    #82549 - 11/07/07 08:32 AM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    Xelif Offline
    member

    Registered: 07/04/07
    Posts: 241
    Loc: Bay Area, California, USA
    Jim - you can MAKE (flake I suppose) an arrowhead? That's pretty impressive.

    The scallop shell spoon is one of the most ingenious pieces of 'silverware' I've ever seen. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif" alt="" /> Might have to grab a good shell next time I'm at the shore. How do you fasten the wood? Looks like a little cord or something similar.

    How durable and resistant is the obsidian to wear and tear? Do you use it for anything heavy duty?

    I feel like I'm trespassing into forbidden territory, a young guy like me reading a thread in here! It's not just older people who like this stuff, a buddy and I were fascinated by it in college, working at the school's nature preserve. Haven't pursued it like you of course, glad you made this thread.
    _________________________
    - John

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    #82550 - 11/07/07 09:47 AM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    finallyME Offline
    member

    Registered: 09/24/07
    Posts: 2710
    Loc: Utah
    In my early college days, I took an anthropology class. One time we watched some film showing someone making arrowheads, spearheads, etc. As a kid, I also wanted to do it, and tried, unsuccessfully, to make my own arrowheads out of stone. My brother and I made bows and arrows all the time, and my parents didn't care about us shooting each other, ie, they didn't work very well. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif" alt="" /> Anyways, even us younger types think it cool that you can do it. I plan to learn myself someday.
    _________________________
    I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.

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    #82551 - 11/07/07 01:49 PM Re: Native gear [Re: finallyME]
    Jimshaw Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/22/03
    Posts: 3938
    Loc: Bend, Oregon
    Hi me etc
    Well thanks for the genuine interest. I'll post a couple of photos and tell ya more. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />
    First off if you want to make a scallop shell spoon, make a dedicated handle for it and tie it to a stick thats been ground down to the right shape with a flat spot aganst the back of the shell. Its easiest to drill and carve shell with a dremel, but don't breath the dust. There is artificial (yellow rough nylon) sinew on the market. I use it to tie my arrowheads and feathers to arrow shafts. (I cheat and use 1/4" dowls) <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/ooo.gif" alt="" />



    This photo shows 3 flakes and a practice piece. The lower right flake is from triflow - 3 colored obsidian. This shows just how thinly obsidian can split. Surgeons use obsidian knifes for some delicat operations. The brown mahogany obsidian is a "spall" a larger flake that can become a tool. It has a huge flake removed from the top side making it very thin and ready to become a spear head. The lower left is a "youth practice piece" found in Nevada. It has flakes over its entire surface yet it never turned into anything useful.



    In this image I am showing how thin the mahogany spall is. When I stepped on the cord and pulled it taught, I only had to run about an inch of unsharpened blade (in its historic condition after being found on the ground) with moderate pressure and the cord cut cleanly.


    Here is an old hand woven Navajo rug, my deerskin quiver full of arrows and an arrow on the blanket.



    Some old arrowheads and 2 spear heads. At the top is an obsidian needle, which come is all sizes. and on the top left is a hole puch "awl" make from an arrowhead. A good piece of rock can be many tools as it becomes broken and reduced. An axe can become 5 arrowheads that become 10 bird points and an awl. Making an awl is way difficult and it is made from a broken arrowhead.



    Heres is my pipestone 4 winds pipe, a ground hatchet head from central Illinois, a spall on the left, and a scraper of shale from the north west territories.



    this photo shows how the arrow is notched for the arrowhead and tied in. Pine pitch might also have been used. The necklace is a real Jivarro head hunter piece woven with seed pods. Sometimes I wear it.



    2 more arrowheads on arrows



    and finally this is my Kachina Eagle Dancer that I bought in New Mexico in August.

    I met a Cree Indian in Nevada who took us home to his museum house. He showed us all of his toys and taught me to flake rock. Thank you Wild Bill. There are books on the subject and you can mail order heat treated preshaped arrowheadds that work easily.

    WARNING
    Stone flakes are sharper than razors. Use atleast 2 layers of THICK belt leather between your hands and the piece. Wear leather gloves and safety goggles. Do not breath the dust. Be satisfied at first with bird points as its about all you'll be able to get. I takes a lot of practice to make the flake the size you want and to make it run in the direction you choose. The next hard thing is learn to knotch it so it can be tied to an arrow.
    Jim <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif" alt="" />
    P.S. be prepared to get a condition called "arrowhead shoulder", an intense pain in the neck from pushing so hard while pressure flaking. Modern people just are not tough enough to go around breaking rocks all day.
    _________________________
    These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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    #82552 - 11/07/07 04:05 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    Dryer Offline
    Moderator

    Registered: 12/05/02
    Posts: 3571
    Loc: Texas
    Jim, which are artifacts and which did you flake? Do you actually hunt with those? Results?
    There is no obsidian near here and dang little flint. Near where I grew up there was a pasture that was plowed every year and afterwords, you would see flint points glitter in the morning sun. We'd go pic them up. Never got a good story why there were so many on the same property. Also, around here, we have mostly caleche (limestone) soil, so the flint had to come from far away. There are hearth middens locally and a suspected burial mound in the park I care for.
    I never mounted any of the arrow or spear points we found as kids. Most were given away or lost as we didnt' realize the rareness. I've still got a handful.
    _________________________
    paul, texas KD5IVP

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    #82553 - 11/07/07 08:33 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Dryer]
    Jimshaw Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/22/03
    Posts: 3938
    Loc: Bend, Oregon
    Dryer,
    All of these are artifacts except for the mounted arrowheads.

    As you point out, the rock availability is quite different around the country. There is a scale of difficulty but anyrock without a lot of quartz is hard. The shale scraper in one photo was probably made by an expert, with poor rock. Obsidian is the best and the prettiest and was traded widely. Some of THESE flakes may have been flaked thousands of years ago.

    One method of making blades is to use a punch of deer antler and to go around and around a core punching off long spalls. This leaves a very clear set of identifiable marks in the rock. I have a core so old that the shiny spots where flakes came off are weathered and slightly pockmarked (meaning a couple thousand years old,) AND it has recent fresh marks from being found and reused as a core in the last few hundred years.

    The hatchet was ground, so no flaking. Jade tools are used someplaces. Jade cannot be flaked, but can easily be ground and holds an edge well.

    I've never worked anything but obsidian but the materials in my collection and my friends run the gamut. I have a beautiful Rhyolite arrowhead thats afavorite. The 9 arrowheads on the red background look mostly like chert to me, and I think they are mostly from the midwest. My shoulder gave out after making 13 arrowheads, couldn't even lay in a dentist chair till I quit flaking for 9 months.

    If I was a hunter I might get more into making arrows and try to make a good bow. I made 2 as a kid, but they weren't much good.
    Jim <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />
    P.S. This is why I say you don't need a knife, compass, flashlight, sunscreen, first aid kit, repair kit or canteen. Now Weapons were certainly part of survival a thousand years ago and a bow and a knife were needed for combat as well as gathering food, but what real purpose do they serve modern campers making a low impact visit to the woods?
    _________________________
    These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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    #82554 - 11/08/07 06:22 AM Re: Native gear [Re: Dryer]
    finallyME Offline
    member

    Registered: 09/24/07
    Posts: 2710
    Loc: Utah
    I am surprised there is little flint by you. When I was in San Antonio, I always found LOTS of flint. Every time I walked down a stream or dried creek bed, I always found tons of large round flint rocks. Some times I tried to chip it and make something, but was never successful. I am guessing you are over by Dallas. I guess the rock structure is different there. San Antonio is mostly lime stone, mixed with lots of flint.
    _________________________
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    #82555 - 11/08/07 08:27 AM Re: Native gear [Re: finallyME]
    Dryer Offline
    Moderator

    Registered: 12/05/02
    Posts: 3571
    Loc: Texas
    I'm up just south of Dallas. We're on a formation called the "Austin Chalk" which is soft limestone. In the Trinity River bottoms you get sands and gravels. Metamorphic or igneous won't start showing up on the surface until you go southwest a ways. Flint is a sedimentary rock, and nodes of it are in limestone, but it's too soft and recient around these parts. It's always been a mystery to me where the flint/chert points came from around here. I do know of some battles were fought here which might explain a lot. Did native Americans know about melting sand into glass and making their own 'obsidian'? Maybe they knew of 'pockets' of hard rocks around here, but I've never heard of any.


    Edited by Dryer (11/08/07 08:55 AM)
    _________________________
    paul, texas KD5IVP

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    #82556 - 11/08/07 09:10 AM Re: Native gear [Re: Dryer]
    Jimshaw Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/22/03
    Posts: 3938
    Loc: Bend, Oregon
    Dryer
    good rock was a extremely valuable commodity. Yosemite obsidian has been found in south american artifacts. Good spalls (flat and thin) could be packed up and carried away for trade. Anyplace with crummy rock traded for rock that could be used for tools. Those guys also spent a lot of time looking and alluvial deposits around streams was a good place to look.
    Jim
    _________________________
    These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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    #82557 - 11/08/07 09:54 AM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    Xelif Offline
    member

    Registered: 07/04/07
    Posts: 241
    Loc: Bay Area, California, USA
    Like Jim says, good obsidian was traded widely in all cultures; across hundreds of miles of open ocean in the Pacific (seriously), across the Sierra, up to Greenland, extensively in South America, and those are just what I remember. One of the first things we learned at my school's nature preserve was that we were unlikely to find any obsidian artifacts as they were all traded in from the nearest source quite some distance away, and thus highly valued, rarely lost. The area was only seasonally inhabited as a hunting ground, another factor which reduced the likelihood of artifacts showing up.

    The little bits of iron that crept into stone-tool-using cultures illustrate how widely good stone (and metal at the end) was traded. Norse iron and coin was found down in Georgia with the nearest Norse settlements way up in Newfoundland if I recall. The Hawaiians had quite a bit of excitement, i.e. violence, over some iron nails yielded from contact with Captain Cook. Native American trading networks yielded European artifacts quite a distance from the actual Europeans. Unfortunately smallpox and other disease spread well across the same networks.

    Most of my information comes from Jared Diamond's books, "Guns, Germs, and Steel" and "Collapse" and other tidbits of information I've picked up over the years, I'm not an expert or anything <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

    Great photos and description, Jim! That's a very impressive collection you have amassed.
    _________________________
    - John

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    #82558 - 11/08/07 12:06 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Xelif]
    Earthling Offline
    member

    Registered: 02/22/03
    Posts: 3228
    Loc: USA
    Doh! You HAD to start this thread diid'nt ya' Jim <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif" alt="" /> Well it's a GREAT one and I'm no closet rockhound myself <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif" alt="" />...shuffle....shuffle...bump...just getting the bits together for a photo <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/ooo.gif" alt="" />

    Just this morning I had the fortune of getting a free deer, roadkilled right in front of my mailbox by a lame a** driver who bolted when I went out to see if he was alright <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif" alt="" /> i skinned it out and divied up the meat that was ok with my neighbors. It would've been a shame to just let that doe go to waste to the dump <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif" alt="" />
    _________________________
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    #82559 - 11/08/07 04:21 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Earthling]
    Jimshaw Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/22/03
    Posts: 3938
    Loc: Bend, Oregon
    Earthling
    Didja skin it with an obsidian flake?
    Jim <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />
    _________________________
    These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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    #82560 - 11/09/07 11:48 AM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    Earthling Offline
    member

    Registered: 02/22/03
    Posts: 3228
    Loc: USA
    I actually started to but then my hands were getting so cold and slippery I did'nt want to screw up the hide and went Wyoming on it <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif" alt="" />
    _________________________
    PEPPER SPRAY AIN'T BRAINS IN A CAN!

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    #82561 - 01/30/08 12:22 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    Inpolar Offline
    newbie

    Registered: 12/17/07
    Posts: 10
    Loc: Polar Russia
    Native gear

    Hello, Jim
    During school years I was interested in Indians lifestyle, especially Dakota tribe. I don't know are there in USA aboriginal people preserved traditional lifestyle? I live in the Russian north; we have developed reindeer-breeding. Native people komi keep close ties with the surrounding nature. In present time native people komi wear fur clothes and footwear, wander round on tundra, pasture their reindeers, use reindeer teams, and live in national habitation made out of reindeer skin. The most of inhabitants of my town wear reindeer 's winter boots <<pymy>>. So am I because it's the warmest kind of footwear.
    A lot of local people can processing fur and skin.

    My husband is poacher...,sometimes, he
    produce scabbard (sheath) made of elks skin and use it during hunting.


    Komi people girded their long fur coats with a broad (10 cm) skin belt. Hunters tie to the belt all the necessary things, such as two knifes, grindstone, sometimes amulets. Unknown authors notice that number of beers fangs means number of new woman.


    Knitting is very popular kind of woman handicraft. We can see socks knitted in national tradition (from rough wool ornamented with horizontal multicolored stripes) not only in museum. The widely spread patterns are: "frame";, "magpie paw"; and swastika. I'm not komi but I knit socks in local tradition and prefer to use dogs wool thread. My families wear knitting socks for skiing and winter trip. Men wear ornamented socks too.








    This photo shows reindeers sleighs. Local people use wooden sleigh in summer too. Komi live in habitation "chym"; covered by reindeers skin.
    Our guests Belgians disposed their photos and impression here: http://blog.atmospheres.be/?cat=20

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    #82562 - 01/30/08 12:49 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Inpolar]
    Jimshaw Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/22/03
    Posts: 3938
    Loc: Bend, Oregon
    Inpolar
    Wow. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />
    Thank you so much for writing to us and sharing. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />
    I have email friends from some very isolated places on the Earth,but your photos are so exotic and strange to me that they are difficult to comprehend they are so - well forgein. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />

    I will try to find Inta on Google Earth.

    Please continue to write in and share with us. I think we would love to hear about the native clothes and camping gear from your area. Reindeer skin tents - now thats not ultralight! <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif" alt="" /> but then if you have a tank then weight isn't as important. I have to admit that few of us have ever used a tank to reach a traihead, but with a tank you wouldn't have to stop at the parking lot if you felt like driving in - might be nice to camp in when in grizzly bear country.

    Do you know the GPS coodinates of INTA?

    You asked about our native Americans - (Indians). There are large reservations where Native Americans live. They are generally not the traditional lands of those people though. They were moved by the US government to worthless desert land after taking their homelands. The indians did not know how to live in the new lands since their lands and way of life were destroyed. So the government built them "pre-made" houses. They are now soverein nations within the united states and we treat them much better now. Now they are citizens. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

    Your english is quite good. Says a lot for the soviet school system. Americans cannot write in Rusian. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif" alt="" />

    Bye and stay warm,
    <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />Jim <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />
    _________________________
    These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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    #82563 - 01/30/08 05:44 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    TomD Offline
    Moderator

    Registered: 10/30/03
    Posts: 4963
    Loc: Marina del Rey,CA
    Jim, that's a pretty imposing RV, How would you like to show up at Badger Pass in that thing? No trouble finding a parking spot. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

    Inpolar, Thank you for the link to the photos. Are you in Siberia? I have seen a documentary about the people we call Eskimos who originally came to North America from Russia across the Bering Strait when it was frozen over maybe a thousand years ago.
    _________________________
    Don't get me started, you know how I get.

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    #82564 - 01/30/08 06:20 PM Re: Native gear [Re: TomD]
    Jimshaw Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/22/03
    Posts: 3938
    Loc: Bend, Oregon
    TomD

    No - not Siberia. Shes at 66 north and 60 east. Type "Inta, Russia" into Google Earth. Its way north in the Republic of Komi and the native people are Komi. funny huh?
    Jim <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />
    _________________________
    These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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    #82565 - 01/30/08 08:08 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    phat Offline
    Moderator

    Registered: 06/24/07
    Posts: 4107
    Loc: Alberta, Canada

    Nice pictures on the blog Inpolar!

    Inta looks very nice. Much like the Canadian Arctic to me.

    What's neat about it, is when I go to google Maps and look at the satellite photos
    of where you are, the photos are better than the ones of the Canadian Rockies where
    I spend much of my time backpacking. Guess you have the satellites more interested
    in you!

    Do you go reindeer hunting up there?
    _________________________
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    My 3 season gear list
    Winter list.
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    #82566 - 01/30/08 10:14 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    TomD Offline
    Moderator

    Registered: 10/30/03
    Posts: 4963
    Loc: Marina del Rey,CA
    Thanks Jim, If you click on her name, it goes to her profile here-then click on the web link for her site. It is all in Cyrillic, but if you copy the text and go to www.Babelfish.altavista.com, you can get a rough translation. It is pretty stilted and hard to follow, but you can get the idea of what they offer.

    From what I can gather, they have a guiding business-hunting, fishing, climbing and sightseeing with travel in that tank like thing and some others I haven't figured out yet. That tracked thing looks like a leftover from the old Soviet Army days. Who needs UL when you are cruising along in that?

    It is amazing how huge the place looks. Anyone who complains about crowds should book a trip to this place.

    Forgot to mention-your Indian pieces are very nice. I remember seeing kits for the Kachina dolls when I was in the Boy Scouts many moons ago. Yours are the real deal.


    Edited by TomD (01/30/08 10:16 PM)
    _________________________
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    #82567 - 01/31/08 02:00 PM Re: Native gear [Re: phat]
    finallyME Offline
    member

    Registered: 09/24/07
    Posts: 2710
    Loc: Utah
    Quote:

    Do you go reindeer hunting up there?


    I was going to ask you the same thing phat. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />
    _________________________
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    #82568 - 02/02/08 09:22 AM Re: Native gear [Re: finallyME]
    phat Offline
    Moderator

    Registered: 06/24/07
    Posts: 4107
    Loc: Alberta, Canada
    Quote:

    I was going to ask you the same thing phat. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />


    Nope. You can hunt barren ground caribou in canada, but I'm too far south for them.
    We have woodland caribou but they're so threatened by habitat degredation (cutlines and roads) that they are endangered.
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    #82569 - 02/03/08 07:27 AM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    chaz Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/22/07
    Posts: 1149
    Loc: Tennessee
    I am also part Cherokee indian. When I was young I lived in Idaho and was introduced to the Nezperce indians in that area through school functions and at local logging events. A lot of people think that the feathers worn by indians are for decoration, but they have another fuction. Do you know what that is?
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    #82570 - 02/03/08 11:19 AM Re: Native gear [Re: chaz]
    Jimshaw Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/22/03
    Posts: 3938
    Loc: Bend, Oregon
    Chaz,
    I understand the feathers where awarded for acts of bravery of other special "virtues" and the assortment of feathers told you about the person wearing them.

    Please tell us more.
    Jim <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />
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    #82571 - 02/03/08 07:34 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Inpolar]
    midnightsun03 Offline
    member

    Registered: 08/06/03
    Posts: 2936
    Loc: Alaska
    Inpolar...

    If I didn't know those photos were from Russia, I'd have sworn they were taken in Alaska.

    We have many native peoples here, but none that live a truly native lifestyle. There are communities that are close to "original," but for many years the natives were not allowed to practice their native ways, and so many traditions were lost. It is a very sad thing, in my opinion.

    Andrea
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    #82572 - 02/04/08 12:01 PM Re: Native gear [Re: Jimshaw]
    bulrush Offline
    member

    Registered: 04/19/07
    Posts: 132
    Loc: Michigan
    I found Inta at 66.055N lat x 60.219E.

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    #82573 - 02/04/08 04:49 PM Re: Native gear [Re: bulrush]
    JAK Offline
    member

    Registered: 03/19/04
    Posts: 2569
    Cool stuff.

    Speaking of native gear...
    Here is an interesting geo-cache if you want to find 13,842 Leki Poles.

    Latitude 49.7667 Longitude 20.6000 Altitude (feet) 1026

    Lat (DMS) 49 46' 0N Long (DMS) 20 36' 0E Altitude (meters) 312

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    #82574 - 02/04/08 05:44 PM Re: Native gear [Re: JAK]
    midnightsun03 Offline
    member

    Registered: 08/06/03
    Posts: 2936
    Loc: Alaska
    Ummmmmm... what would anybody do with 13,842 Leki Poles?

    That's a real head scratcher for sure.
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