Feathered Friends 300x250
Superior Down Sleeping Bags & Clothing

Ultralight Adventure Equipment (ULA)    

   
 
 
Lite Gear Talk

BCG Holiday Sale

Amazon.com
Backpacking Forums
BackcountryGear.com
backcountry gear

---- Our Gear Store ----
The Lightweight Gear Store
 
 WINTER CAMPING 

Shelters
Bivy Bags
Sleeping Bags
Sleeping Pads
Snow Sports
Winter Kitchen

 SNOWSPORTS 

Snowshoes
Avalanche Gear
Skins
Hats, Gloves, & Gaiters
Accessories

 ULTRA-LIGHT 

Ultralight Backpacks
Ultralight Bivy Sacks
Ultralight Shelters
Ultralight Tarps
Ultralight Tents
Ultralight Raingear
Ultralight Stoves & Cookware
Ultralight Down Sleeping Bags
Ultralight Synthetic Sleep Bags
Ultralight Apparel


the Titanium Page
WM Extremelite Sleeping Bags

 CAMPING & HIKING 

Backpacks
Tents
Sleeping Bags
Hydration
Kitchen
Accessories

 CLIMBING 

Ropes & Cordage
Protection & Hardware
Carabiners & Quickdraws
Climbing Packs & Bags
Big Wall
Rescue & Industrial

 MEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 WOMEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 FOOTWEAR 

Men's Footwear
Women's Footwear

 CLEARANCE 

Backpacks
Mens Apparel
Womens Apparel
Climbing
Footwear
Accessories

 BRANDS 

Black Diamond
Granite Gear
La Sportiva
Osprey
Smartwool

 WAYS TO SHOP 

Sale
Clearance
Top Brands
All Brands

 Backpacking Equipment 

Shelters
BackPacks
Sleeping Bags
Water Treatment
Kitchen
Hydration
Climbing


 Backcountry Gear Clearance


Stay Healthy--Eat Well

MARY JANES FARM ORGANIC MEALS

Mary Janes Farm Organic Backcountry Meals

NATURAL HIGH GOURMET MEALS

Natural High

 

Page 3 of 4 < 1 2 3 4 >
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#77971 - 04/08/08 06:55 AM Filter problems [Re: speyguy]
BarryP Offline
member

Registered: 03/04/04
Posts: 1574
Loc: Eastern Idaho
I’ve had problems w/ Hiker Pro filters and I will probably have problems with the MSR Hyper Flow filters (I would love to be proved wrong).

Hiker Pro claims 0.3 micron filtering.
AutoFlow and HyperFlow claim 0.2 micron filtering.

Yet the filter I use only claims 0.4 micron filtering (First Need). Thus you would expect the First Need to filter less impurities than the Hiker Pro. However, Put 2-4 drops of dark food coloring in 1qt of water. Filter; then see if the filtered water comes out clear. If this test works, then this is also a good method to see if one has accidentally cracked said filter. Hiker Pro always lets the colored water come right through. First Need does not.

Will someone prove me wrong on the MSR Flow filters?

Thank you,
-Barry

Top
#77972 - 04/08/08 07:48 AM Re: Filter problems [Re: BarryP]
phat Offline
Moderator

Registered: 06/24/07
Posts: 4107
Loc: Alberta, Canada
Depending on your food coloring, I strongly suspect that you aren't measuring the filter pores. food coloring is just a largish organic molecule - A chemical - which filters alone won't remove - so I'm surprised any filter would remove it - unless it has a charcoal or other active prefilter that gloms onto the organic stuff in the food dye. - but then you're measuring the fact that you have a prefilter that reacts with the food coloring, as opposed to filtering it.
_________________________
Any fool can be uncomfortable...
My 3 season gear list
Winter list.
Browse my pictures


Top
#77973 - 04/08/08 09:30 AM Re: Filter problems [Re: phat]
Rick_D Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/02
Posts: 2802
Loc: NorCal
Yup--adsorbtion versus filtration. Also, is the colored water a solution or a suspension?

Possibly a decent test for organics, probably invalid for particulates.

Quote:
Depending on your food coloring, I strongly suspect that you aren't measuring the filter pores. food coloring is just a largish organic molecule - A chemical - which filters alone won't remove - so I'm surprised any filter would remove it - unless it has a charcoal or other active prefilter that gloms onto the organic stuff in the food dye. - but then you're measuring the fact that you have a prefilter that reacts with the food coloring, as opposed to filtering it.
_________________________
--Rick

Top
#77974 - 04/08/08 01:06 PM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: OregonMouse]
jasonlivy Offline
member

Registered: 01/02/04
Posts: 654
Loc: Colorado
Quote:
Quote:
One major disadvantage to the ULA's filter is that it's not field cleanable.


Funny, I've cleaned this filter in the field three times, two of them just for practice.

I haven't really timed the filtering speed of the ULA Amigo Pro and I really don't care, because while it's filtering I'm doing something else, like resting or cooking or admiring the scenery or some such. I don't go out backpacking to indulge in speed; there's too much of that going on in "civilization." I'm more interested in weight, price and effectiveness. If I want speed, I'll get a Steripen or return to using a pump filter.
I'm only familiar with the Hiker Filter element. I know, having used one on several trips, that it isn't field cleanable, especially to the 80% rate of the Hollow Fiber filter. My understanding is that the Hiker Pro cartridge simply has a fine mesh screen that surrounds the same filter element that has always been the Hiker. This is simply an internal prefilter and the pores of the screen aren't small enough to remove the microbes which pass through to the main element. My feeling is that you may be able to clean the stuff that can be seen in the water (algae, dirt, etc.), but the stuff that can't be seen is slowly clogging the Hiker Pro's main element.

The Hollow Fiber is a non-absorbing material (unlike the paper filter of the Hiker and Hiker Pro) that releases very easily the microbes that normally clog a filter. In the case of the Miniworks EX, the user can simply remove layers of ceramic. With the Sweetwater, the user removes layers of the fiber matrix from the inside (special brush) but some of the gunk that is absorbed can't be removed. However, with the Hiker Pro, the only thing that can be done is to either clean the mesh screen or replace the screen (I've inspected it very thoroughly and feel confident that this is the case). You simply can't clean the main filter element effectively. Although there is a claim that backflushing helps, I've never noticed it working for me.

I'm not here to promote that the Hiker Pro or Hiker are bad. I do think the fact that they aren't as field maintainable as other filters (as is the case with the Hiker Pro) is a disadvantage, but they have many advantages. I've used them for several years and have always had good experiences. However, based on my experience, I have never successfully been able to clean a filter element in the field or at home. In some cases I've only been able to filter 20 gallons from my Hiker due to blue-green algae in the high Uintah Lakes.

Hollow Fiber is fully cleanable and will improve the performance of the filter almost to what it was when you first bought it. It's not as good as the Miniworks, but far superior than any other filter currently available.

In terms of the speed, the reason why gravity fed filters aren't that widely accepted is because of the weight and speed. I believe that if the user would realize that they can get water as fast from their gravity fed filter as from a pump, then more people would be interested in the gravity fed system. I agree that we are in way to big of a rush in our daily lives and to get out in the backcountry and slow down is highly desirable. That is a huge reason why I go out. Unfortunately sometimes I don't think ahead and seem to forget about water until I need it. With the AutoFlow, this isn't a problem. With other gravity fed filters, I would wait upwards of an hour or more (not the case with the Amigo Pro). The best thing is, even when the water is ready to consume after only 4 minutes, I can still lay around and veg until I'm ready to use it.
_________________________
Believe, then you will Understand...

Top
#77975 - 04/08/08 01:14 PM Re: Filter problems [Re: BarryP]
jasonlivy Offline
member

Registered: 01/02/04
Posts: 654
Loc: Colorado
Quote:
I’ve had problems w/ Hiker Pro filters and I will probably have problems with the MSR Hyper Flow filters (I would love to be proved wrong).

Hiker Pro claims 0.3 micron filtering.
AutoFlow and HyperFlow claim 0.2 micron filtering.

Yet the filter I use only claims 0.4 micron filtering (First Need). Thus you would expect the First Need to filter less impurities than the Hiker Pro. However, Put 2-4 drops of dark food coloring in 1qt of water. Filter; then see if the filtered water comes out clear. If this test works, then this is also a good method to see if one has accidentally cracked said filter. Hiker Pro always lets the colored water come right through. First Need does not.

Will someone prove me wrong on the MSR Flow filters?

Thank you,
-Barry
I got this from our water specialist at Cascade Designs. She said, "The threads on trying to test the filter’s ability to remove food coloring from water is not an appropriate test. The filter removes particulate and pathogens down to 0.2 micron, not dissolved solids such as salt, food coloring, acids, etc. If you filter a coke, for instance, it will still be the same brown color as it went in, but all of the pathogens bigger than 0.2 microns will be removed."

My understanding is that the First Needs Filter element is basically a positively charged Carbon Matrix (I've cut into one and it looks like a big chunk of black volcanic rock). This would explain it's ability to remove the food coloring where other filters won't. The Miniworks EX does a better job than most, but that's because of it's carbon core. The HyperFlow won't take out any of the food coloring because it has no carbon component.
_________________________
Believe, then you will Understand...

Top
#77976 - 04/08/08 01:39 PM Re: Filter problems [Re: jasonlivy]
BarryP Offline
member

Registered: 03/04/04
Posts: 1574
Loc: Eastern Idaho
Thanx for checking on that Jason.
As phat put it “food coloring is just a largish organic molecule…”, true.
And I like filtering out ‘largish organic molecules’ <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />
-Barry

Top
#77977 - 04/08/08 01:59 PM Re: Filter problems [Re: BarryP]
phat Offline
Moderator

Registered: 06/24/07
Posts: 4107
Loc: Alberta, Canada

And it's fine to like carbon in your filter to glom onto colors and smells (for a little while anyway). however just remember that it's not really a valid test for filtering pathogens, or for checking for a
cracked filter.
_________________________
Any fool can be uncomfortable...
My 3 season gear list
Winter list.
Browse my pictures


Top
#77978 - 04/09/08 09:03 AM Re: Filter problems [Re: phat]
BarryP Offline
member

Registered: 03/04/04
Posts: 1574
Loc: Eastern Idaho
“however just remember that it's not really a valid test for filtering pathogens, or for checking for a
cracked filter.”

?
So First Need and all their engineers and scientists have been wrong all these years?
It appears they have a pretty slick method for finding an internally damaged filter.
From http://www.generalecology.com/first%20need%20original%20instructions.pdf

“A simple test to assure that the canister has not been damaged internally, either during use, transport or backwash is to:
1. Add a couple drops (no more) of ordinary red, green or blue food coloring to a glass of water
2. Pump this solution through the canister.
3. The filtered water should be colorless.
If the filtered water is still colored, even faintly, the internal canister matrix has most likely been damaged and THE CANISTER SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON UNDER THIS CONDITION AND MUST BE REPLACED.”

There’s a lot of good stuff at their Q&A: http://www.generalecology.com/qa.htm

-Barry

Top
#77979 - 04/09/08 10:18 AM Re: Filter problems [Re: BarryP]
Rick_D Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/02
Posts: 2802
Loc: NorCal
Right. Because First Need is a carbon filter, dye bleed-through means one of three things: 1. a mechanical failure causing the water's path to short-circuit (bypass) filteration or 2. the carbon is saturated and has started desorbing (sloughing off) organic contamination or 3. you're pumping too fast for the filter to adsorb the dye (which could potentially occur with a brand new filter, depending on the maximum pump rate).

i.e., If you see dye discharge from a First Need (or a Hiker or any filter with carbon) you know there's a problem. If scenario 1. pathogens will make it through into the discharge. If scenario 2. pathogens may still be captured, but your cartridge has adsorbed all the carbon its capable of. Unfortunately, just by observing color you can't know which.

With a filter that doesn't use carbon, nothing of value is learned via the dye test. It's not a measure of the filter's effectiveness against pathogens.

Quote:
“however just remember that it's not really a valid test for filtering pathogens, or for checking for a
cracked filter.”

?
So First Need and all their engineers and scientists have been wrong all these years?
It appears they have a pretty slick method for finding an internally damaged filter.
From http://www.generalecology.com/first%20need%20original%20instructions.pdf

“A simple test to assure that the canister has not been damaged internally, either during use, transport or backwash is to:
1. Add a couple drops (no more) of ordinary red, green or blue food coloring to a glass of water
2. Pump this solution through the canister.
3. The filtered water should be colorless.
If the filtered water is still colored, even faintly, the internal canister matrix has most likely been damaged and THE CANISTER SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON UNDER THIS CONDITION AND MUST BE REPLACED.”

There’s a lot of good stuff at their Q&A: http://www.generalecology.com/qa.htm

-Barry
_________________________
--Rick

Top
#77980 - 04/09/08 02:27 PM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: jasonlivy]
300winmag Offline
member

Registered: 02/28/06
Posts: 1342
Loc: Nevada, USA
Jason,

It will be nice if the new MSR hollow tube filter media is as good as it sounds. If it is "backpacker proof" and works as advertised I'm sure it will replace a lot of lesser filters. By "lesser" I mean of lesser longevity in the field.

I'm still using my SteriPen Adventurer year around with Katadyn chlorine dioxide tabs as backup. I'll use #2 coffee filters W/small funnel 1st if the water looks less than clear.

But, filter or UV treatment preferences aside, I still think it's good to pop a few chloring dioxide tabs in one's hydration bladder every three to four days and at cleanup time just to preclude any nasties in the bladder, hose and, especially, mouthpiece.

Eric
_________________________
"There are no comfortable backpacks. Some are just less uncomfortable than others."

Top
#77981 - 04/10/08 06:32 AM Re: Filter problems [Re: jasonlivy]
BarryP Offline
member

Registered: 03/04/04
Posts: 1574
Loc: Eastern Idaho
“If you filter a coke, for instance, it will still be the same brown color as it went in,…”

Hey, that sounds like a fun experiment!
Hmm. I don’t have any coke around. How about a nice sticky grape Aldi soda? Extremely carbonated and purplish… lot of natural and artificial flavors… not one but several artificial and natural colors… high fructose corn syrup…

OK, here it goes, pure soda… up the First Need filter tube… And it comes out….. CLEAR! Wow. That just looks amazing.

But what does it taste like? All the color is gone… the carbonation is totally gone. There is a very slight taste of sweetness… like corn syrup. So it didn’t get all that liver-loving high fructose stuff out.

Still that’s incredible (OK, I get astounded easy). And now First Need has an even faster flow filter out for the same weight.

-Barry

Top
#77982 - 04/10/08 10:07 AM Re: Filter problems [Re: BarryP]
Rick_D Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/02
Posts: 2802
Loc: NorCal
A gentle suggestion: backflush and/or chlorine-treat the filter, since the sugar the filter took up will serve as bacteria food.

p.s. Does First Need silver-coat their carbon?

Quote:
“If you filter a coke, for instance, it will still be the same brown color as it went in,…”

Hey, that sounds like a fun experiment!
Hmm. I don’t have any coke around. How about a nice sticky grape Aldi soda? Extremely carbonated and purplish… lot of natural and artificial flavors… not one but several artificial and natural colors… high fructose corn syrup…

OK, here it goes, pure soda… up the First Need filter tube… And it comes out….. CLEAR! Wow. That just looks amazing.

But what does it taste like? All the color is gone… the carbonation is totally gone. There is a very slight taste of sweetness… like corn syrup. So it didn’t get all that liver-loving high fructose stuff out.

Still that’s incredible (OK, I get astounded easy). And now First Need has an even faster flow filter out for the same weight.

-Barry
_________________________
--Rick

Top
#77983 - 04/10/08 11:48 AM Re: Filter problems [Re: Rick_D]
phat Offline
Moderator

Registered: 06/24/07
Posts: 4107
Loc: Alberta, Canada


Well, I'm also interested in how *long* the filter will pull organics like coke out before the carbon
is tapped out and the filter would need to be replaced.
_________________________
Any fool can be uncomfortable...
My 3 season gear list
Winter list.
Browse my pictures


Top
#77984 - 04/10/08 01:39 PM Re: Filter problems [Re: phat]
jasonlivy Offline
member

Registered: 01/02/04
Posts: 654
Loc: Colorado
Quote:


Well, I'm also interested in how *long* the filter will pull organics like coke out before the carbon
is tapped out and the filter would need to be replaced.
I know the Miniworks EX is rated for 2000 gallons before the carbon becomes unable to absorb any more contaminates, etc. This obviously is dependent on how much organic material, pesticides, etc. is in the water being filtered. The ceramic is rated for 2,000 liters so the carbon should way outlast the ceramic.
_________________________
Believe, then you will Understand...

Top
#77985 - 04/11/08 07:08 AM Re: Filter problems [Re: phat]
BarryP Offline
member

Registered: 03/04/04
Posts: 1574
Loc: Eastern Idaho
Good idea Rick_D to backflush. In fact I backflushed with warm water aftwards. That seems to clean sticky messes better than cold water. And I use 5 drops of bleach in 2 qts of water also for cleaning. I let the pump and tubing soak in my 2qt bleach solution for a few minutes. I then backflush about 1 cup of that bleach solution with a slow, slow pump stroke.


“Well, I'm also interested in how *long* the filter will pull organics like coke out before the carbon
is tapped out and the filter would need to be replaced.”

That is a good question. In fact, for this test, I used an old cartridge. What do I consider old? When my pump stroke becomes twice as hard as normal. I want easy strokes when I’m out backpacking. I save these ‘old’ cartridges because they can still be used for gravity filtering in times of emergency. And I can do experiments like this <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

-Barry

Top
#77986 - 04/23/08 05:01 PM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: jackb]
jasonlivy Offline
member

Registered: 01/02/04
Posts: 654
Loc: Colorado
Quote:
Facts are verifiable. So, does anyone out there have both the Hiker and the new MSR filter? If so, please weigh them on a reliable scale and report the result. Then all of us will know which filter is the lightest and by how much.
I finally got my production sample of the HyperFlow and have weighed it (I'm using the Sunbeam 5 lb. Scale, model SP5). The results are:

-HyperFlow Filter w/o prefilter, hose, lid, or bag: 4.9 oz.

-Lid only: 1.2 oz.

-Hose and Prefilter only: 2.5 oz.

-MSR HyperFlow Bag only (includes Tyvek instructions on how to backflush): 1.1 oz.

-HyperFlow w/ prefilter and hose (not including lid): 7.4 oz. - You can use it in this configuration with Platypus Bottles. The water outlet on the HyperFlow fits perfectly into the Platypus opening.

-HyperFlow w/ prefilter and hose w/ lid: 8.7 oz. - The lid makes filtering into Nalgene and Drom bags much easier.

-HyperFlow w/ prefilter and hose w/ lid and bag: 9.8 oz.

-New HyperFlow filter element only: 0.8 oz (23 g)



I pulled out my Pur Hiker and weighed it. These are the results:

-PUR Hiker Filter w/o prefilter, hose, bottle adaptor, or bag: 8.7 oz.

-PUR Hiker Filter w/ prefilter, hose, and bottle adapter: 12.7 oz.

-PUR Hiker Filter w/ prefilter, hose, bottle adapter, and bag: 13.6 oz.

-New PUR Hiker filter element only: 3.5 oz. (99 g)

*These are dry weights for both filters.
_________________________
Believe, then you will Understand...

Top
#77987 - 04/24/08 03:12 PM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: jasonlivy]
ringtail Offline
member

Registered: 08/22/02
Posts: 2296
Loc: Colorado Rockies
Jason,

Saw one today. It appears that I need to carry a Nalgene bottle to back flush the filter. That is a deal breaker for us Gatorade guys.

Is a Nalgene bottle needed to back flush the filter?
_________________________
"In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are not."
Yogi Berra

Top
#77988 - 04/24/08 03:47 PM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: ringtail]
Aviprk Offline
member

Registered: 10/26/05
Posts: 82
I think you only need a bowl of clean water. It doesn't have to be a bottle. You were probably confused because of the nalgene adaptor

Top
#77989 - 04/24/08 04:12 PM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: ringtail]
jasonlivy Offline
member

Registered: 01/02/04
Posts: 654
Loc: Colorado
Quote:
Jason,

Saw one today. It appears that I need to carry a Nalgene bottle to back flush the filter. That is a deal breaker for us Gatorade guys.

Is a Nalgene bottle needed to back flush the filter?
No. A Nalgene is one method as it gives you a positive connection, but it isn't necessary. You can backflush with narrow mouth bottles including Platypus, traditional soda plastic bottles, etc. The lid will work with Dromlite bags, Drom bags, and any other bottle that will fit a 64mm lid.

According to the official Backflushing directions included with the pump, it's recommended that you use one of three types of containers. These are:
-Hard Bottle (i.e. Nalgene, GSI, etc.)
-Flexible Water Container (i.e. Dromedary with Quick Connect Lid (comes with the HyperFlow), Dromlite, Hydromedary).
-Personal Hydration System (i.e. Platypus Big Zip, CamelBak, etc.). With these you attach the hose (removing the bite valve first) to the nipple on the end of the HyperFlow's filter head.

It's best if you can get a good seal which won't allow air into the system. Air seems to be the biggest issue when backflushing (causes it to not suck water in). A plastic soda bottle will leak, meaning you might get wet, but it should work if inverted.
_________________________
Believe, then you will Understand...

Top
#77990 - 04/24/08 06:50 PM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: jasonlivy]
Richard295 Offline
newbie

Registered: 01/25/07
Posts: 5
Jason,

The twist connection between my Hyperflow pump and associated cap results in significant leakage when a wide mouth bottle is inverted for back flushing. Have you ever done a back flush, using this connection, without experiencing leaks?

Top
#77991 - 04/25/08 11:32 AM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: Richard295]
jasonlivy Offline
member

Registered: 01/02/04
Posts: 654
Loc: Colorado
Quote:
Jason,

The twist connection between my Hyperflow pump and associated cap results in significant leakage when a wide mouth bottle is inverted for back flushing. Have you ever done a back flush, using this connection, without experiencing leaks?
This is normal. I think I misspoke when I said that the connection with the cap and pump was air tight. What really happens is when you invert the bottle when backflushing the connection does become air tight due to the water forcing the air up. There will be leakage but it shouldn't be so bad that all of the water leaks out before you're able to backflush properly.

Without using the lid but instead using a typical 20 oz. soda bottle, there will be more leakage than when using the lid, but with practice the user will still be able to backflush.
_________________________
Believe, then you will Understand...

Top
#77992 - 04/25/08 02:56 PM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: jasonlivy]
Richard295 Offline
newbie

Registered: 01/25/07
Posts: 5
Jason,

Thank you for your prompt and comprehensive response to my question about back flush leakage.

Top
#77993 - 05/04/08 08:44 AM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: jasonlivy]
Paddy_Crow Offline
member

Registered: 11/08/04
Posts: 2285
Loc: Michigan
Follow up to Jason's post, this picture shows the relative size of the Hyperflow and my old Pur filter.

I weighed everything you see in the picture. The MSR unit came to 248 grams (8.8 oz), the Pur came to 349 grams (12.3 oz) or about 101 gram (3.5 oz) difference. The cap, however, weighs 36 grams (1.3 oz). Since it would presumably replace the cap on a water bottle, the scales would tip slightly further toward the MSR unit.

If you use a bladder, you can eliminate the caps and set either filter to pump directly into the bladder. The Pur bottle stopper weighs 24 grams (0.8 oz) and the effluent hose 34 grams (1.2 oz).


Top
#77994 - 05/27/08 09:37 AM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: jasonlivy]
Berserker Offline
member

Registered: 05/10/04
Posts: 493
Loc: Lynchburg, VA
Alright, REI dangled a 20% coupon in front of me again, and curiosity got the better of me. So I ordered one of these, and got it last Friday (it was on backorder, but I only had to wait a few days). The weights posted here are accurate. I weighed mine in at 8.64 oz with everything minus the bottle adaptor (don't need it with Platy and soda bottles). My hiker with everything except the bottle adaptor is 13.05 oz.

So for all the "trash talking" I did earlier in this thread, what do I think? Well, I think this thing is pretty darn cool. I have only tested it in my kitchen, so use in the field will tell the real story. I will actually be out on a multiple day trip in a week, so I'll report on it when I get back.

A couple of general observations:
1. The manual recommends back flushing every 8 liters (basically once a day). I have read a lot of negative stuff about having to back flush, but I tested it out using a platy hoser and thought was pretty easy. I suppose if you use a bottle or something you have to invert it might be more difficult.
2. This thing is about as fast as advertised. I didn't time myself, but it took about 12 pumps to fill up a 20 oz bottle. I can't remember how many pumps it took me with the Hiker, but it was several more than 12.

Top
#181749 - 01/07/14 10:14 PM Re: New MSR Filter [Re: 90RunnerRed]
et mcpappy Offline
newbie

Registered: 12/15/13
Posts: 1
I sure as hell hope so.

Top
Page 3 of 4 < 1 2 3 4 >

Shout Box

Highest Quality Lightweight Down Sleeping Bags
 
Western Mountaineering Sleeping Bags
 
Lite Gear Talk - Featured Topics
Knife, Fire Starter, Ignition Source
by Jim M
12/11/17 07:34 PM
Bivvy bag with wired peak
by Petro1234
12/10/17 01:06 PM
How cheap can you go?
by EMT Dave
12/05/17 07:07 PM
Backcountry Discussion - Featured Topics
Greetings - and a question
by valongi
12/11/17 11:35 AM
Just found out about UCO candles
by toddfw2003
11/30/17 08:41 AM
Hitting the eagle rock loop, Ark in 3 days
by toddfw2003
11/19/17 11:31 AM
Make Your Own Gear - Featured Topics
Plant based insulation...
by billstephenson
11/18/17 02:58 PM
lightest grommets to use
by toddfw2003
10/22/17 06:13 PM
avalibility of thin ti rod
by the-gr8t-waldo
01/26/17 04:45 PM
Featured Photos
Breakneck Ridge, New York
May 2012 Eclipse, Lassen Park
New Years Eve 2011
Trip Report with Photos
Seven Devils, Idaho
Oat Hill Mine Trail 2012
Dark Canyon - Utah
Who's Online
0 registered (), 26 Guests and 0 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
valongi, Atkinson J, Dcarpenter, Woodland, ultralight
12469 Registered Users
Forum Links
Disclaimer
Policies
Site Links
HOME
Backpacking.net
Family Hiking
Lightweight Gear Store
Backpacking Book Store
Lightweight Zone
Hiking Essentials

Outdoor Gear Daily Deals
Outlets, Sales, Bargains

Our long-time Sponsor, BackcountryGear.com - The leading source for ultralite/lightweight outdoor gear:

Backcountry Forum
 
 

Since 1996 - the Original Backcountry Forum
Copyright © The Lightweight Backpacker & BackcountryForum.com