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#27763 - 07/27/05 04:08 PM Re: Dog vocabulary [Re: Jimshaw]
Anonymous
Unregistered


I have an Australian Cattle dog, Scout, that has probably got more Dingo in him than most. I've never had a more loyal companion and he is excellant on the trail. This is probably one of the toughest breeds for enduring long treks over difficult terrain. They were bred to keep cattle moving across long stretches of the Austrailian outback. They need an incredible amount of exercise to work off their energy. I can't imagine how you would train this breed not to bark. Scout's bark has probably cost me a bit of hearing loss over the years. He's not a dog that will bark out of boredom but mainly to get my attention or in his excitement to greet me. The vet had offered to do some sort of surgery on his vocal cords but I would never consider doing such a thing to one of my animals. It is possible that someone had this done to yours. They are definitely not a quiet breed!

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#27764 - 07/27/05 05:23 PM Re: Dog vocabulary
Jimshaw Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/03
Posts: 3938
Loc: Bend, Oregon
Coyote,
She CAN bark and does occasionally, but for the most part you here not a sound, like strangers can knock on the door and she doesn't bark - I understood that dingos don't bark. I heard that sheep dogs bark and cattle dogs are mostly silent. Nope no surgery on her vocal cords, though sometimes when I say speak she only manages a cough...

A neighboor saw her and said her queensland heeler mix also had the red speckles on a white body with a couple big plain red patches.
_________________________
These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

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#27765 - 07/27/05 08:58 PM Re: Dog vocabulary [Re: Jimshaw]
Anonymous
Unregistered


Jim,

The Australian Heelers I've known out here have had sharp annoying barks. I've read that this is a trait also. Either way consider yourself lucky to have a quiet one. I believe that dingoes were partly domesticated wolves from India and were traded to the aboriginies thousands of years ago and are not native to Australia. . They were of value to them in guarding their camps and serving as scouts. The dingoes became extremely loyal to their human friends - I have been told that this accounts for the same trait in most Aussie Cattle Dogs.

Just tonight I was talking to my neighbor when one of his 2 blue heelers was kicked in the head by his rodeo horse. The little fellow got kicked back and tumbled over and just came right back to mess with the horse by nipping at his hooves. They have a super tough skull that gives them better odds of surviving the kicks from angry cattle. They are usually quick to drop down low on their front paws and duck under the cattle kicks. I've seen quite a few of them with only 3 legs helping with cattle. They had most likely lost a leg getting trampled in the middle of a herd. They are so tough that they keep going on 3 legs doing the herding work that they love.

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#27766 - 07/28/05 08:07 AM Re: Dog vocabulary
WyoBob Offline
member

Registered: 05/04/04
Posts: 204
Loc: Buffalo, WY
I love watching cattle dogs work. I never had any on my place but my brother-in-law has a couple on his ranch in Nebraska. They also have lots of cats. It is one of the funniest things I've ever seen when Pat the dog starts hearding cats. I get tears squirting out of my eyes watching that darn dog. The cats have no idea what's going on. My BIL likes having the cats around because it takes the "heat" off the cattle. He really doesn't want the dog running cattle for no good reason so the cats help satisfy Pat's hearding instinct.

WyoBob

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#27767 - 08/08/05 09:59 AM Re: Dog vocabulary [Re: Jimshaw]
Anonymous
Unregistered


Hiya,
I'm new but your post caught my attention because I have an Austrailian cattledog as well, and she does not bark...the only time she feels compelled to is when we start playing and rough housing and then she'll give out a bark with a slight howl sound to it, it's [Edited for inappropriate languge, please review forum policies for more information] cute but that's it. And even then it sounds like she's forcing a bark out.
And as to the training commands - my dog doesn't ever have to be put on a leash because her loyalty and herding, packing instincts were nurtured by our training her to the point that off a leash she will never move farther away than 10, 15 feet of us, even on trails. She never wanders away. It's nothing special on our part but it was this training method called "Follow the Leader" that is very sucessfull with cattledogs. My dog- (Fox is her name) will even heel off a leash, and she has no problems with come and stay commands, but I can honestly say that having this type of breed to train made it a little easier.

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#27768 - 08/08/05 10:03 AM Re: Aussie Cattle Dog
Anonymous
Unregistered


Hiya,
I'm new but your post caught my attention because I have an Austrailian cattledog as well, and she does not bark...the only time she feels compelled to is when we start playing and rough housing and then she'll give out a bark with a slight howl sound to it, it's [Edited for inappropriate languge, please review forum policies for more information] cute but that's it. And even then it sounds like she's forcing a bark out.
And as to the training commands - my dog doesn't ever have to be put on a leash because her loyalty and herding, packing instincts were nurtured by our training her to the point that off a leash she will never move farther away than 10, 15 feet of us, even on trails. She never wanders away. It's nothing special on our part but it was this training method called "Follow the Leader" that is very sucessfull with cattledogs. My dog- (Fox is her name) will even heel off a leash, and she has no problems with come and stay commands, but I can honestly say that having this type of breed to train made it a little easier.

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#27769 - 08/10/05 12:04 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs? [Re: paulj]
Anonymous
Unregistered


Quote:
My dog is not a toy or gear that I can just stash in the closet for the season. My dog's safety and well being is as much my concern if I have to leave it behind, as if I have it with me.


I agree 100%. Our golden retreiver is part of our family, and he goes everywhere with us. He is almost 2 years old, and is finally coming out of his puppy stage and beggining to mature. We took him to obedience training when he was 1 yr old, and it really paid off. When hiking, we keep him leashed if we are in a heavily traveled area, and turn him loose once we get out into the boonies. He stays in front of us on the trail, never leaving our site, and checks back periodically. As for waste, he always takes it upon himself to move well off the trail to relieve himself. Also, his presence gives my wife & I a certain peace of mind. I'm not sure how far he would go in protecting us from a bear, or even another human with ill intentions toward us, but his senses are 100% better than ours, and he lets us know when something is wrong or out of place.

Each dog should be treated on a case by case basis. Of course, everyone should follow pet laws that are in place for the area that they are visiting, but other than that, no one knows your dog and his/her abilities better than you. Remember, YOU, the owner, are responsible for all actions of your pet!

As for those people who say "Leave your dog at home", how would you like it if someone told you to leave your child at home?

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#27770 - 08/10/05 03:39 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Quote:
As for those people who say "Leave your dog at home", how would you like it if someone told you to leave your child at home?
If my child screamed needlessly, intimidated people, and sniffed their crotches, I would leave him at home. But there's no need to go through all that again.

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#27771 - 08/10/05 07:24 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs?
Paddy_Crow Offline
member

Registered: 11/08/04
Posts: 2285
Loc: Michigan
I've come to the conclusion that people who don't want dogs on the trail just plain don't want dogs around anywhere. No matter how many well behaved dogs cross their path, they will continue to dwell on those few that have made a bad impression.

Fortunately, the overwhelming majority of people I meet on the trail are not like that. They seem to enjoy meeting my dog as much as my dog enjoys meeting them.

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#27772 - 08/11/05 08:49 AM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Quote:
If my child screamed needlessly, intimidated people, and sniffed their crotches, I would leave him at home. But there's no need to go through all that again.


Obviously you just don't get it. I for one (and I am guessing most hikers who take dogs along with them) take my 'best friend' along with me, not to annoy others, but to allow him the experience of being completely surrounded by nature in an environment where he can truly "be a dog". He does not "destroy" the environment that we pass thru, anymore than you & I, or even other wild animals destroy it.

He does not bark (he growls at night if something "strange" approaches him).
I doubt if he intimidates most people. He responds immediately to all commands that I give him.
He does not 'sniff' peoples crotches. In fact, if you ignore him when passing us on a trail, he keeps to himself completely. It's people who greet him in a high pitch voice with arms flailing in the air who normally get his attention.

But like I said before, each person must judge their dog individually. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />

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#27773 - 08/11/05 09:52 AM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs?
ringtail Offline
member

Registered: 08/22/02
Posts: 2296
Loc: Colorado Rockies
I have a limited understanding of the situation, but more backcountry places are putting restrictions on dogs. They are not allowed in most National Parks and are required to be on leash in Wilderness Areas and my local Open Spaces. These rules are to prevent the bad behavior caused by a very small number of bad owners.

The majority of good owners need to exert more peer pressure on the bad owners. If this is not done then the rules will become more and more restrictive.

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#27774 - 08/11/05 09:55 AM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs?
dkramalc Offline
member

Registered: 09/19/03
Posts: 1070
Loc: California
It seems to me that Bill does "get it". What he's saying is what it seems most of the people, dog owners and not, on this thread have said - IF your dog does not behave well in the wildnerness setting, it should stay at home; otherwise, fine. I would not bring my best (human) friend on a backpacking trip if they were unable to keep from annoying or harrassing wildlife and other backpackers - same should go for a dog, IMHO.
_________________________
dk

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#27775 - 08/11/05 11:12 AM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs? [Re: dkramalc]
Anonymous
Unregistered


Quote:
It seems to me that Bill does "get it".


I am new to this forum, and I don't mean to offend anyone. From the posts that I have read so far, this seems like a very good community of people with alot of experience in backpacking, and I look forward to reading about & sharing in hiking tips and trips of others. <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

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#27776 - 08/11/05 01:37 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs?
Anonymous
Unregistered


No worries.

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#27777 - 03/01/08 08:27 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs?
dhock83 Offline
member

Registered: 02/20/08
Posts: 30
Loc: Southeast Ohio
Ok Im sorry I found all I need here

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#158667 - 12/13/11 02:20 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs? [Re: Anonymous]
aimless Offline
Moderator

Registered: 02/05/03
Posts: 2859
Loc: Portland, OR
I am moving this old thread to the new Hiking with Animals forum, because it seems like a far-ranging and useful discussion of the subject and it will be easier to find if I relocate it.

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#158672 - 12/13/11 03:20 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs? [Re: Anonymous]
billstephenson Offline
Moderator

Registered: 02/07/07
Posts: 3889
Loc: Ozark Mountains in SW Missouri
No no, I got it... I've just been messing with other stuff. I'll grab a few pics when I go out to feed the menagerie this afternoon wink
_________________________
--

"You want to go where?"



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#158677 - 12/13/11 04:18 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs? [Re: Paddy_Crow]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
Originally Posted By Paddy_Crow
I've come to the conclusion that people who don't want dogs on the trail just plain don't want dogs around anywhere. No matter how many well behaved dogs cross their path, they will continue to dwell on those few that have made a bad impression.

Fortunately, the overwhelming majority of people I meet on the trail are not like that. They seem to enjoy meeting my dog as much as my dog enjoys meeting them.


Patently untrue of me. I love all animals.

However, many people who have tried to bring their dogs hiking when our group goes on trails that allow dogs have proved that many dogs are not suitable hiking companions. One bit someone (a ranger, no less) and another got in a fight with a really good hiking dog and caused damage. Other dogs have not been with our party, but have barreled along the trail at a high rate at us, frightening people with their behavior.

What many dog owners fail to recognize is that there is a way to train your dog to the task at hand, and they are not doing it, which leads to the sad consequence of me encouraging people not to bring their dogs at all, for their safety more than anything else. If I can tell they have not thought much past "it would be fun to take Fifi!" to what they will do if Fifi's paws start to bleed after a mile across granite, I discourage it.

There are dogs I would go backpacking with in a heartbeat - they are well behaved, come reliably when called, even will not drink from streams until told they can - contrast with a friend's dog that suffered horrible giardia after a low elevation hike.

When I tell people not to bring a dog, it's because I'm more concerned for the dog.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

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#158678 - 12/13/11 04:36 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs? [Re: lori]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
You'd think I would have learned to look at dates - what an old thread! but interesting reading.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

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#158679 - 12/13/11 04:51 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs? [Re: billstephenson]
skcreidc Offline
member

Registered: 08/16/10
Posts: 1590
Loc: San Diego CA
Its good you responded that post Bill. One of the "anonymous's" has been waiting 6 years for that response! grin You use to be able to post anonymously? Unregistered even?

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#158681 - 12/13/11 04:59 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs? [Re: lori]
billstephenson Offline
Moderator

Registered: 02/07/07
Posts: 3889
Loc: Ozark Mountains in SW Missouri
I didn't check the date either blush

I thought it was a comment on OM saying she's waiting for my pics grin
_________________________
--

"You want to go where?"



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#158701 - 12/13/11 08:17 PM Re: thanks for the info [Re: Damian]
squark Offline
member

Registered: 03/14/11
Posts: 66
Loc: SF bay area, CA
Despite the age of this thread I wanted to make a couple of comments on earlier posts; hope that's ok:

Quote:
One note: Forget the Ipecac. If you need to induce vomitting in your dog, just use table salt.


Just a note: hydrogen peroxide works as well. I do know of one dog who died after salt-induced vomiting. The rimadyl she ate that necessitated an emetic of course may have been the main cause, but the salt was suspected as well: http://www.bordercollie.org/boards/index...mp;#entry232967

Quote:
Australian working dogs were bred to work all day in heat (and cold) so Kelpies and Blue Heelers definitely don't mind the heat.


I think acclimation matters as well. I live in an area that largely stays between 45-75F year-round, and my heeler mix (probably with shepherd or malinois or similar) seems uncomfortable hiking in temps much over 80, so we stick to the coast or woodlands in the summer.

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#176427 - 04/13/13 02:13 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs? [Re: Anonymous]
Sash Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/13/13
Posts: 1
Loc: Victoria, BC, Canada
I would NEVER go on a hike without my Staffy. As long as you are always in control of your dog there is no reason to leave them at home. I know some people say that they might attract bears and cougars but where I live, there is a 90% chance I'll run into them anyways. You just have to be prepared for it, after all, we are in their neighborhood. hehe.

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#176434 - 04/13/13 11:24 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs? [Re: Sash]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
Originally Posted By Sash
I would NEVER go on a hike without my Staffy. As long as you are always in control of your dog there is no reason to leave them at home. I know some people say that they might attract bears and cougars but where I live, there is a 90% chance I'll run into them anyways. You just have to be prepared for it, after all, we are in their neighborhood. hehe.


Except for the fact that you can't take them to national parks, and I refuse to not go to national parks.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

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#176435 - 04/13/13 11:43 PM Re: What About Hiking With Dogs? [Re: lori]
aimless Offline
Moderator

Registered: 02/05/03
Posts: 2859
Loc: Portland, OR
If I lived in California, I'd hike in the National Parks there as often as I could, too. I'm not sure what the rules are concerning dogs in Canadian National Parks.

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