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#187681 - 11/12/14 10:39 AM Keeping Hands Warm
4evrplan Offline
member

Registered: 01/16/13
Posts: 690
Loc: Nacogdoches, TX, USA
Anyone use any tricks to keep your hands warm, besides the obvious (gloves and/or mittens)? What about chemical hand warmers (any type - air, crystal, battery, fuel)? Are they worth the weight to you?

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#187685 - 11/12/14 11:31 AM Re: Keeping Hands Warm [Re: 4evrplan]
billstephenson Offline
Moderator

Registered: 02/07/07
Posts: 3915
Loc: Ozark Mountains in SW Missouri
I use "Hot Hands" chemical warmers a lot, and yes, they're well worth the weight in my opinion.
_________________________
--

"You want to go where?"



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#187699 - 11/13/14 11:26 AM Re: Keeping Hands Warm [Re: 4evrplan]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
just gloves or mittens for me.
_________________________
I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.

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#187708 - 11/13/14 08:04 PM Re: Keeping Hands Warm [Re: finallyME]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6459
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
For cold weather camping, I use layers of gloves. I have a pair of thin Smartwool gloves that I use around camp--they are thin enough that I can handle my stove and other cooking chores without taking them off. Being wool, I can use them to handle a hot pot without their melting. Far, far, better than chilled hands which are hard to warm up.

Second layer is a pair of lightweight fleece mittens--warm, breathable and fast-drying. Third layer is a pair of Mountain Laurel Designs eVent rain mitts. I've never been in a situation in which I've needed more, although if you are in an area that gets below zero you will undoubtedly need heavier mittens--or another pair--for the middle layer.

I've found that the separate layers are far easier to dry out when they inevitably get wet.


Edited by OregonMouse (11/13/14 08:06 PM)
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

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#187752 - 11/18/14 05:49 PM Re: Keeping Hands Warm [Re: 4evrplan]
NH2112 Offline
newbie

Registered: 07/18/14
Posts: 10
Loc: Maine
If you're not already, wear a hat. Keeping your head warm will help keep your hands & feet warm. Hands sweat a lot, especially if you're working with them, and wicking glove liners will get the moisture away from your skin. Make sure that your wrists are covered, the blood vessels are close to the skin and radiate heat away. I'd recommend a multi-layered approach, with the wicking liners first, then an insulating layer (wool is my favorite), and finally a breathable, waterproof outer layer with or without insulation. Remove 1 or more layers as temperature and conditions allow. Make sure to bring the other layers with you when you buy new stuff, so you can verify they all fit together. Don't wear them too tight, you shouldn't feel any restriction or pressure anywhere except a slight amount where there's elastic or straps.

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