Amazon.com
Backpacking Forums
BackcountryGear.com
backcountry gear

---- Our Gear Store ----
The Lightweight Gear Store
 
 WINTER CAMPING 

Shelters
Bivy Bags
Sleeping Bags
Sleeping Pads
Snow Sports
Winter Kitchen

 SNOWSPORTS 

Snowshoes
Avalanche Gear
Skins
Hats, Gloves, & Gaiters
Accessories

 ULTRA-LIGHT 

Ultralight Backpacks
Ultralight Bivy Sacks
Ultralight Shelters
Ultralight Tarps
Ultralight Tents
Ultralight Raingear
Ultralight Stoves & Cookware
Ultralight Down Sleeping Bags
Ultralight Synthetic Sleep Bags
Ultralight Apparel


the Titanium Page
WM Extremelite Sleeping Bags

 CAMPING & HIKING 

Backpacks
Tents
Sleeping Bags
Hydration
Kitchen
Accessories

 CLIMBING 

Ropes & Cordage
Protection & Hardware
Carabiners & Quickdraws
Climbing Packs & Bags
Big Wall
Rescue & Industrial

 MEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 WOMEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 FOOTWEAR 

Men's Footwear
Women's Footwear

 CLEARANCE 

Backpacks
Mens Apparel
Womens Apparel
Climbing
Footwear
Accessories

 BRANDS 

Black Diamond
Granite Gear
La Sportiva
Osprey
Smartwool

 WAYS TO SHOP 

Sale
Clearance
Top Brands
All Brands

 Backpacking Equipment 

Shelters
BackPacks
Sleeping Bags
Water Treatment
Kitchen
Hydration
Climbing


 Backcountry Gear Clearance


Stay Healthy--Eat Well

MARY JANES FARM ORGANIC MEALS

Mary Janes Farm Organic Backcountry Meals

NATURAL HIGH GOURMET MEALS

Natural High

 

Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#179040 - 08/09/13 12:12 PM Best Cook Set
Mero Offline
newbie

Registered: 07/27/13
Posts: 8
Searched the forum and was surprised to find very little on the subject of actual cook ware (pots and pans). Lots of stuff about food and stoves however.

Anyway, whats a great cook set you guys would recommend for two people that plan on doing the basic stuff?

Top
#179043 - 08/09/13 12:44 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: Mero]
DTape Offline
member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 656
Loc: Upstate NY
As with most gear, it always depends on the trip and the people. In general, when I go with a buddy we usually fend for ourselves when eating so we have our own system. I use a single 700 mL pot and he uses a smaller pot and cup system. Both of us use our own dehydrated meals with these setups.

With another friend, on our canoe trips we cook and eat together. For this we bring one 700 mL pot, one 900mL and one small skillet. We also each have our own stove. With this setup we can do quite a bit. For example on our last trip we had sausage, french toast and coffee for breakfast 1. Dinner 1 was cheeseburger-vegetable mac and cheese and skillet cookies for dessert.

In the end, the best is what works for you and your style. I have found that i can do quite a lot with few pots and pans and the cleanup is minimal too. YMMV
_________________________
http://ducttapeadk.blogspot.com

Top
#179047 - 08/09/13 01:58 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: Mero]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6401
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
Most of us just boil water to rehydrate freeze-dried or home-dehydrated food, so we don't need a cook set, just a single pot.

Mine is a Firelight 0.5 liter titanium pot I bought from Backpacking Light back when they were selling gear. I also have a 1.3 liter Ti pot to use when I take the grandkids. I do take a separate frying pan when fishing (in case I catch anything), but normally I just bring water to a boil and pour it over my dried foot food (which is in a freezer bag), stir and let it sit in a cozy 15 minutes. I then eat it out of the freezer bag. The only thing I need to wash is my spoon.

For the budget-conscious, try the famous grease pot. Ditch the inner filter and replace the wooden knob on the lid with a small piece of wire. I use the pliers on my Leatherman Micra as a pot lifter. Some like to drill a couple of holes and add a wire bail. Yes, the grease pot will get pretty battered after a couple of years, but you can buy a lot of them for the price of one titanium pot!

If you're going to do real cooking instead of just boiling water, get anodized aluminum rather than titanium. Ti doesn't spread the heat, so you'll have burned food over the flame and raw elsewhere.


Edited by OregonMouse (11/11/13 04:46 PM)
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

Top
#179052 - 08/09/13 02:55 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: Mero]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
The best cookset is a single pot with a utensil. Currently I use a snowpeak titanium bowl with a lightmyfire titanium spork. The rule for me is, use the lightest pot that meets your needs, with the eating utensil of your choice.

Many times my scouts will bring a full mess kit. I usually advise against it, but I let them decide for themselves. The only thing that gets used is the pot. I also tell them to go to the thrift store and buy a fork or spoon. That way their mom doesn't get mad when they lose it (they always do).


Edited by finallyME (08/09/13 02:55 PM)
_________________________
I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.

Top
#179056 - 08/09/13 06:28 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: finallyME]
Mero Offline
newbie

Registered: 07/27/13
Posts: 8
You guys are great, thanks for all the feedback.

Ive heard bad things about the durability and longevity of titanium but you guys seem to like your titanium pots.

I think 1x800ml and pan/cover should be fine for our needs-boiling water for coffee, oatmeal, dried food/milk etc and the pan for torts and pancakes (lots of blueberries up in the boundary waters).

Snow Peak and MSR are companies Im familiar with that make quality products.

Still leaning towards steel though...

Top
#179057 - 08/09/13 07:56 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: Mero]
DTape Offline
member

Registered: 11/23/07
Posts: 656
Loc: Upstate NY
My Ti pot is made by evernew. The abuse it has gone through has demonstrated to me the durability and longevity of at least that brand of Ti products. My pot was even used when I got it. My Al pots have been thoroughly abused too. They might be dented, covered in soot, scratched up but they are still perfectly functional. Haven't used steel in many many years. It has its place though depending on how and what you are cooking, but there is no need to choose steel because of durability issues with either Al or Ti.
_________________________
http://ducttapeadk.blogspot.com

Top
#179058 - 08/09/13 10:41 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: DTape]
Gershon Offline
member

Registered: 07/08/11
Posts: 1109
Loc: Colorado
I use the 2 cup pot on top of my Svea 123 stove and a spork.
_________________________
http://48statehike.blogspot.com/

Top
#179060 - 08/10/13 12:38 AM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: Mero]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6401
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
As I previously mentioned, if you're going to cook pancakes, your fry pan should be aluminum, not titanium. You need a metal that will conduct the heat well so it's more even, and titanium doesn't do that. Anodized aluminum is best.

As with all backpacking gear, try it out at home first!
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

Top
#179064 - 08/10/13 11:01 AM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: Mero]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
I have so many cook kits, it is quite possible I could outfit a boy scout troop. But they would all have a different stove and size/shape of pot.

Narrow flame, narrow bottom pot. Wide flame pattern, wide pot. Wider pots are actually slightly quicker to boil and more effective due to the flame having a wider metal surface to cover, instead of concentrating all the heat on a single point. Wider burners are better for cooking - so matching the stove to the purpose is also important.

Aluminum beer can pots, hard anodized tea kettle, ti .9 liter Evernew, Snow Peak ti Hybrid kit with silicon bowl and lid, grease pot - all of 'em do just fine at boiling water, so if that's your method, you can take your pick of whatever you prefer and do well.

I do have one frying pan - an MSR 10" for which I need to carry a pot lifter. No handle makes it easier to stabilize on a backpacking stove. Handles can overbalance a very light pan.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

Top
#179148 - 08/13/13 02:45 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: Mero]
JPete Offline
member

Registered: 05/28/09
Posts: 304
Loc: Eastern Ontario
Mero,

I use an old (actually very old) Boy Scout cook kit aluminum pot. I carry in it a titanium wing stove for my Esbit tablet, a foil windscreen, a little patch of foil to put on the ground under the stove, a folding titanium spark, and a plastic cup with volume marks. Oh, and I have a very light home-made bag for it, and in the bottom of the bag I carry a small round of plastic scouring pad. I rarely use it, but it weighs virtually nothing, and once in a while the bottom of the pot gets gunked up a bit. I rarely ever use the markings on the cup either, but again, they weigh nothing. Also I carry a tiny pocket knife. That's it for me.

best, jcp

Top
#179171 - 08/14/13 05:53 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: OregonMouse]
BZH Offline
member

Registered: 01/26/11
Posts: 848
Loc: Torrance, CA
Originally Posted By OregonMouse
.... pour it over my dried foot (which is in a freezer bag), ...


You keep a dried foot in a freezer bag??? You learn something new about people every day....

Top
#179178 - 08/15/13 12:26 AM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: JPete]
balzaccom Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 1731
Loc: Napa, CA
And we used an old aluminum pot that we bought for $1 at thrift shop for years--until we found a nicer one abandoned at a campsite in the Hoover Wilderness. Now we use it!
_________________________
balzaccom

check out our website and blog: http://www.backpackthesierra.com/home

Top
#179236 - 08/16/13 09:10 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: finallyME]
Glenn Roberts Offline
Moderator

Registered: 12/23/08
Posts: 1382
Loc: Southwest Ohio
My lightest cookset is a Snow Peak Trek 700 titanium pot, and an Antigravity Gear food cozy. I boil water in my pot, pour it into the dried food in a heavy-duty freezer bag (though, as pointed out elsewhere, Mouse prefers dried foot), and place the bag in the cozy to rehydrate. Food is oatmeal in the morning, and some kind of rice-and-meat dish in the evening. I prefer the bags my outfitter sells, which are the same kind Enertia uses to package its food; no worries about holes or hot water melting them.

If I want a cup of hot tea, I make it in the pot (depending on how much water the food takes, that may mean a second fill-and-boil, or just using what's left from the first boil.)

If, for some reason, I don't want to use the freezer bags (such as, I get tired of getting food all over my fingers dipping my spoon into the bag), I take the Jetboil Sol kit, and cook in the pot or make oatmeal in the little measuring cup. Hot tea has to wait till I'm done eating, though.

Lately, the 700 pot and food cozy seem to be going most often.

Top
#179457 - 08/27/13 11:28 AM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: lori]
wandering_daisy Offline
member

Registered: 01/11/06
Posts: 2752
Loc: California
I have also found that a wider based pot boils water faster than a narrow based pot. I have a titanium solo "pot/cup" that I do not use much anymore because for the little extra weight, I use less fuel, over the long run. In addition, I like to use my pot as a wash basin, and the solo cup is not suitable for that! I also have steam-fried fish in the 1-L pot. The only time I use the solo pot now is when I simply do not have room for the larger pot (weekend trips where I use my daypack and forego the tent). The most important thing for me in considering a pot, is the lid. You need a tight fitting lid to steam fish. I also need to have a pot that fits inside my bear canister and one that my titanium cup fits within. I had to squish the handle of my cup to get it to fit within the solo pot.

I have not had problems with burning food using titanium, even when frying. My stove is really good at simmering on a low flame. I find that when simmering, the fuel can seems to build pressure so I have to constantly turn down the flow to keep the same simmering flame.

I use a spork. A spork can be drippy if meals are soupy. My husband hates sporkes, and has a spoon and fork set. Lately, in my more addled mind and poor eyesight of old age, I may switch to a plastic spoon, just because they come in bright colors. I seem to always forget where I laid down my titanium spork just when I needed it!

Top
#180655 - 11/11/13 10:15 AM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: Mero]
Blue_Ridge_Ninja Offline
member

Registered: 09/09/11
Posts: 98
Loc: North Georgia
While I've been happy with my JetBoil set, I'm thinking about picking up one of these from Stanley: http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-Adventure-..._pr_product_top

Yes, it's... *gasp*... stainless steel, but I have read/heard literally nothing but positives.

Top
#180666 - 11/11/13 04:47 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: BZH]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6401
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
OK, I fixed that. As I get older, my typing gets worse…. blush
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

Top
#181316 - 12/14/13 06:29 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: OregonMouse]
bpackengneer Offline
member

Registered: 05/01/13
Posts: 26
Loc: Massachusetts
Well, for me basic means just that. My wife and I eat basic on the trail. As such, we use an Evernew 1 L pot and 2 sporks. Done :-)

Backpacking Engineer


Edited by bpackengneer (12/14/13 06:30 PM)

Top
#181319 - 12/14/13 11:37 PM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: bpackengneer]
jimmyb Offline
member

Registered: 09/16/13
Posts: 276
We have an old MSR Black lite set from years ago. I take only the small pot BPing (no pot holder) and the rest of the set when flying away. That little set is great, I wish they still made them. The small pot is as light as most ti pots and I like the coated aluminum. I realize that companies introduce new product lines to get us to want the latest model gear but I wish they would continue making some of the classic pieces of gear that just plain work.

jimmyb

Top
#181322 - 12/15/13 12:54 AM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: jimmyb]
TomD Offline
Moderator

Registered: 10/30/03
Posts: 4963
Loc: Marina del Rey,CA
I just have an old uncoated aluminum kit, Mirro, I think, and a small Primus pot I carry when day hiking for making hot chocolate or soup. The pot will hold a small gas canister and Primus stove. I also have an old school Svea 123 stove and the Sigg Tourist cook kit I got years ago (like 30) which is great if weight isn't a big factor.


Edited by TomD (12/15/13 02:17 AM)
_________________________
Don't get me started, you know how I get.

Top
#183409 - 03/01/14 08:47 AM Re: Best Cook Set [Re: Mero]
mrnic3guy Offline
member

Registered: 02/10/14
Posts: 22
Loc: SW Pennsylvania
I took mine from a large mess kit that my grandmother had. This thing was huge like 4 liters it consisted of a large pot with a smaller pot inside 4 coffee cups four plates and a pan lid and the only peice I carried from it was a 1.3 liter coffe pot with a strainer built into the spout and detachable handle. When I was kid and my uncle would tell me stories of him and his friends going BP in the Allegheny NF I would imagine taking the whole cook set and making like idk big bowls of chilli for everyone lol. Now yesterday my GSI Pinnacle Soloist arrived from amazon and it is really cool the only thing I dont like is the lid is plastic but it comes with a telescoping spork an insulated bowl/cup and the lid has a spout on side strainer on the other also it comes with a nice little bag for your stove. I can fit my stove and gas all inside this nifty little thing.
_________________________
what may in many circumstances be only clarity; seeing clearly what there is to be done and doing it directly, quickly, aware … looking at it.

Top

Shout Box

Highest Quality Lightweight Down Sleeping Bags
 
Western Mountaineering Sleeping Bags
 
Lite Gear Talk - Featured Topics
Knife, Fire Starter, Ignition Source
by Jim M
12/11/17 07:34 PM
Bivvy bag with wired peak
by Petro1234
12/10/17 01:06 PM
How cheap can you go?
by EMT Dave
12/05/17 07:07 PM
Backcountry Discussion - Featured Topics
Greetings - and a question
by valongi
12/11/17 11:35 AM
Just found out about UCO candles
by toddfw2003
11/30/17 08:41 AM
Hitting the eagle rock loop, Ark in 3 days
by toddfw2003
11/19/17 11:31 AM
Make Your Own Gear - Featured Topics
Plant based insulation...
by billstephenson
11/18/17 02:58 PM
lightest grommets to use
by toddfw2003
10/22/17 06:13 PM
avalibility of thin ti rod
by the-gr8t-waldo
01/26/17 04:45 PM
Featured Photos
Breakneck Ridge, New York
May 2012 Eclipse, Lassen Park
New Years Eve 2011
Trip Report with Photos
Seven Devils, Idaho
Oat Hill Mine Trail 2012
Dark Canyon - Utah
Who's Online
2 registered (), 31 Guests and 0 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
valongi, Atkinson J, Dcarpenter, Woodland, ultralight
12469 Registered Users
Forum Links
Disclaimer
Policies
Site Links
HOME
Backpacking.net
Family Hiking
Lightweight Gear Store
Backpacking Book Store
Lightweight Zone
Hiking Essentials

Outdoor Gear Daily Deals
Outlets, Sales, Bargains

Our long-time Sponsor, BackcountryGear.com - The leading source for ultralite/lightweight outdoor gear:

Backcountry Forum
 
 

Since 1996 - the Original Backcountry Forum
Copyright © The Lightweight Backpacker & BackcountryForum.com