Almost Over the Hill Hikers
  • Over the Hill Hikers [Hardcover]
  • Almost Over the Hill Hikers

    Amazon.com
    Backpacking Forums
    BackcountryGear.com
    backcountry gear

    ---- Our Gear Store ----
    The Lightweight Gear Store
     
     WINTER CAMPING 

    Shelters
    Bivy Bags
    Sleeping Bags
    Sleeping Pads
    Snow Sports
    Winter Kitchen

     SNOWSPORTS 

    Snowshoes
    Avalanche Gear
    Skins
    Hats, Gloves, & Gaiters
    Accessories

     ULTRA-LIGHT 

    Ultralight Backpacks
    Ultralight Bivy Sacks
    Ultralight Shelters
    Ultralight Tarps
    Ultralight Tents
    Ultralight Raingear
    Ultralight Stoves & Cookware
    Ultralight Down Sleeping Bags
    Ultralight Synthetic Sleep Bags
    Ultralight Apparel


    the Titanium Page
    WM Extremelite Sleeping Bags

     CAMPING & HIKING 

    Backpacks
    Tents
    Sleeping Bags
    Hydration
    Kitchen
    Accessories

     CLIMBING 

    Ropes & Cordage
    Protection & Hardware
    Carabiners & Quickdraws
    Climbing Packs & Bags
    Big Wall
    Rescue & Industrial

     MEN'S APPAREL 

    Jackets
    Shirts
    Baselayer
    Headwear
    Gloves
    Accessories

     WOMEN'S APPAREL 

    Jackets
    Shirts
    Baselayer
    Headwear
    Gloves
    Accessories

     FOOTWEAR 

    Men's Footwear
    Women's Footwear

     CLEARANCE 

    Backpacks
    Mens Apparel
    Womens Apparel
    Climbing
    Footwear
    Accessories

     BRANDS 

    Black Diamond
    Granite Gear
    La Sportiva
    Osprey
    Smartwool

     WAYS TO SHOP 

    Sale
    Clearance
    Top Brands
    All Brands

     Backpacking Equipment 

    Shelters
    BackPacks
    Sleeping Bags
    Water Treatment
    Kitchen
    Hydration
    Climbing


     Backcountry Gear Clearance


    Stay Healthy--Eat Well

    MARY JANES FARM ORGANIC MEALS

    Mary Janes Farm Organic Backcountry Meals

    NATURAL HIGH GOURMET MEALS

    Natural High

     

    Page 2 of 2 < 1 2
    Topic Options
    Rate This Topic
    #134114 - 05/22/10 10:09 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: sabre11004]
    wandering_daisy Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/11/06
    Posts: 2752
    Loc: California
    I have been inside a Sublight Sil. I thought it was quite spacious - particulary compared to my Micro-Zoid.

    I interpreted the post to mean he was trying to get his "base weight in his pack" to 12 pounds, not counting water because he had to carry a lot (fixed amount)of water.

    I think there is too much emphasis on the starting base weight, including water. When desert hiking you often have to overload with water for the first few days and just put up with it. The water weight rapidly is reduced as you go along.

    Top
    #134324 - 05/27/10 02:34 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: DJ2]
    sabre11004 Offline
    member

    Registered: 05/05/07
    Posts: 513
    Loc: Tennessee
    I'd be interested in the tent you have at a total weight of two (2) pounds. I would like to maybe look into getting something that light if it were to fit my needs...sabre11004... goodjob
    _________________________
    The first step that you take will be one of those that get you there 1!!!!!

    Top
    #134341 - 05/27/10 04:20 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: sabre11004]
    OregonMouse Offline
    member

    Registered: 02/03/06
    Posts: 6401
    Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
    There are lots of 2-person tents around that weigh close to 2 lbs., and plenty of solo tents at about a pound and a half. Here are some:
    Tarptent
    Six Moon Designs (Check out the new Vamp and Haven with net inner tents
    Gossamer Gear
    Mountain Laurel Designs (floorless pyramids)
    Z Packs (probably the lightest weight tents currently available)




    _________________________
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

    Top
    #134593 - 06/02/10 07:26 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: ChrisFol]
    wildthing Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/11/02
    Posts: 982
    Loc: Victoria, B.C.
    Chris, really depends on use. You can get away with a tarp at most spots in the summer but it might be a bit dicey in spring going through some of the mountains on the Arizona Trail.

    I can sew up a tarp that is quite sufficient, but wouldn't end up using it as much around here. I might manage it for the desert section of the Arizona Trail except for the snakes and scorpion. How do you find it in Colorado?

    The coastal hikes here don't strictly require a tent in the summer but we've been getting a bit of rain this year and the North Coast Trail can get windy, foggy, and damp.

    As for a sleeping pad, I've long passed using a regular Thermorest and the foam pads just don't do it anymore! Lightness and luxury cost, but good quality wins out in the long haul.
    _________________________
    Listen to the trees in the wind

    Top
    #138155 - 08/30/10 12:58 AM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: wildthing]
    skinewmexico Offline
    member

    Registered: 09/23/08
    Posts: 81
    How about swapping your sleeping bag for for a quilt? Maybe someething by Jacks 'R Better?

    Top
    #138218 - 08/31/10 06:55 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: OregonMouse]
    Kent W Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/15/09
    Posts: 607
    Loc: IL.
    Mouse awsome reply! Cant put a price on sleep. I have avoided the neoair and have a full length prolight. When temps dipped in the smokies to below 12 degrees I could feel when my feet slipped off the pad. The cold penitrated. If my prolight punctures I still have a bit of pad and insulation. I now have a G4 that I made from akit, 2 pound down bag from rei, aluminum grease kettle from wally world. water filter, sil tent I made, pack cover first aidkit a 2.3 oz colomon extreame canister stove that works and simmers awsome. Base weight at 12 pounds flat les water. I may have forgot a few items too such as head lamp.

    Top
    #139234 - 09/23/10 04:11 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: OregonMouse]
    wildthing Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/11/02
    Posts: 982
    Loc: Victoria, B.C.
    OregonMouse I have landed on a new pad! Here's what it is looking like now:

    Mountainsmith Ghost 40oz
    Tarptent with floor 35oz
    Marmot Hydrogen Long 24oz
    Ether Thermo Elite 15oz
    Total Big 4 7lbs 2oz

    I turned up a POE Thermo Elite after repeated tries to get a 6, no one had them. Pretty good pad, and 15oz weight!
    _________________________
    Listen to the trees in the wind

    Top
    #143036 - 12/08/10 08:43 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: DJ2]
    stonemark Offline
    member

    Registered: 12/07/10
    Posts: 82
    Loc: China
    Originally Posted By DJ2
    Don't you mean 42" chest?

    I just measured around my 125 lb, 5' 2" wife's shoulders and it's about 44". Mine are another 10 inches or so and it's even wider around my body where my elbows stick out. I'm muscular, 5' 8" and weigh about 180 lbs.

    I too have problems with sleeping bags being too tight around the shoulders and elbows. Feathered Friends Swallow, for example, is too tight. I now have a Montbell stretch bag that runs about 2 lbs and is good to about 20 degrees F. I've been real happy with it.

    ---that's true, agree with you~
    _________________________
    adventure in China~my site

    Top
    #143102 - 12/09/10 05:21 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: sabre11004]
    DJ2 Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/06/02
    Posts: 1347
    Loc: Seattle, WA
    Sorry I'm so slow to respond to your post. I somehow overlooked it.

    My two pound tent is home made. Pictures and info are in the Make Your Own Section of this website (not in forum) and it is titled Two Pound Bivy Tent.

    But I agree with the other posters. Two pound 1 and 2 person tents are now available and the trend seems to be downward weight wise. Very exciting.

    Top
    #144120 - 12/29/10 03:03 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: wildthing]
    DRG Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/30/06
    Posts: 15
    Loc: Oklahoma
    There are a couple of things to bring your pack weight down. Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 at 2 lb 7 oz including ground sheet. Your sleeping can be 16 oz (see Nunatakusa.com for details). I am 64 years old and carry 14 pounds on my back (including food) and 5 pounds on my chest including water (see Ribzwear.com for chest pack). If I would eliminate a couple of items, I would be at the 12 lb area. Best of luck.

    Top
    #144143 - 12/30/10 05:45 AM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: DRG]
    BrianLe Offline
    member

    Registered: 02/26/07
    Posts: 1146
    Loc: Washington State, King County
    I'm coming late to this party (thread), but some random comments ...

    Quote:
    "I am 64 years old and carry 14 pounds on my back (including food) and 5 pounds on my chest including water (see Ribzwear.com for chest pack). If I would eliminate a couple of items, I would be at the 12 lb area."

    FWIW, I think that for most people the distinction between pack weight and chest pack weight isn't meaningful, but would all lump together as weight carried. Since you're including food and water in that, however --- who knows what it means --- too many unknown variables (# days of food, pounds of food that you eat per day, amount of water typically carried ...). The nice thing about talking in terms of base weight (or skin-out) is that if people are careful about what they're measuring, it's a more apples-to-apples comparison. Heck, after a month on trail I eat more than double what I do on a shorter trip, so even "days of food" can vary not only between individuals but even for the same individual. Best IMO to separate out the consumables.

    One thing I suggest to anyone that has derived what their base weight is supposed to be (via spreadsheet or other list) is to pack up your pack with everything but food + water + fuel and stand on the bathroom scale with and without pack --- hopefully to verify, else to point out omissions from the list/spreadsheet. Ideal time to do this is minutes before leaving on a multi-day backpacking trip, so that every little thing gets counted. Most gear lists I've read through don't look complete to me, leaving off various things.

    One thing that confused me a bit about this thread has been lots of discussion about base weight without talking much about the particular place and season of the trip. For me, at least, it's not too meaningful to talk about base weight without establishing how cold or hot it can get, and how much if any (and what types of) snow walking is involved, plus perhaps other factors such as typical amount of rainfall anticipated, bugs, wind, etc. The experience/background of the hiker factors in here too somewhat; Andrew Skurka goes lighter than I do in part because he's hiked so many miles in varies conditions that he can more safely cut things to a lower minimum.

    Base weight for me varies from low teens up to mid-20's (and I'm talking true base weight), very much depending on the particular trip. I started the AT in February this year with about a 17 pound base weight, dropped to about 14.5 pounds once out of the snow. I'll likely have on the order of 22 pounds of base weight starting on my next significant trip this coming year (never carried bear spray before, for example ...). Going through areas that require a bear cannister adds over 2 pounds for that item alone, and has the potential to change which pack a person takes on the trip.

    Given that this stuff can vary a whole lot by the particular trip, what would be more meaningful to me would be something along the line of (for example) "X pound base weight goal for a summer trip where no snow is anticipated, estimated low temps around 40F, some rain expected". Or perhaps "Y pound base weight goal for a Springtime trip that includes significant time walking on mostly old snow, where an ice axe and at least minimal crampons are carried, low temps estimated in the upper teens".

    I'm at a bit of a loss of what to say to a more generic "12 pound base weight goal", short of making assumptions that might well be incorrect. For example, I live in the NorthWest, and it's easy for us to forget that there are places one can hike where it rarely rains (!).

    Maybe I'm just too much of an engineer at heart. :-)
    _________________________
    Brian Lewis
    http://postholer.com/brianle

    Top
    #144156 - 12/30/10 05:04 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: BrianLe]
    OregonMouse Offline
    member

    Registered: 02/03/06
    Posts: 6401
    Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
    Bryan is right! Do the bathroom scales vs. spreadsheet comparison for the base weight only! There was the time I did the total pack weight on bathroom scales bit (just before going out the door for a 2-day drive to Wyoming) and came out almost two pounds less than my spreadsheet. I therefore spent a couple of frantic hours unpacking and checking every item off against my list again to see what I had forgotten! It turned out that my total food weight (for 9 days) was 2 lbs. less than what I had estimated as 9 days (really 8 1/2 days) times the average. Even then, the food portions turned out to be more than I could eat, so I packed out a lot of excess garbage! I learned from that experience (which resulted in not getting to my destination until 11 pm) to do the spreadsheet/bathroom scale comparison with the base weight and to plug the "food" part of the spreadsheet with the actual total food weight.

    It doesn't matter whether an item is being carried on your back or on your chest or in your pockets, it's still all on your knees and feet! In fact, I'd suggest a measurement of "skin-out base weight" which would be everything in your pack or on your body except for food, water, fuel. My big weight reductions the past few years have been in the "items worn and carried" category which is not part of "base pack weight."

    I appear to have achieved my personal goal of 12 lbs. base pack weight, although I won't know for positive until I've reweighed everything, made a couple of purchases and done a few "shakedown trips ". One writer suggested that to achieve this base weight, you allow 6 lbs. for your "big 4" and 6 lbs. for everything else (remember this is base weight, which does not include food, water or fuel). It seems to have worked out well for me. My "trip model" is mostly above timberline in Wyoming's Wind Rivers, so it includes plenty of warm clothing and rain gear, a warm sleeping bag and (essential for this old lady) a nice cushiony sleeping pad. It's a bit more than I need for summer in my local area (Cascades), where I have the choice of lighter weight clothing layers.

    The above base weight includes my camera (missing from most lightweight lists, even those which include photos of the trip laugh ) but does not include fishing gear (plus frying pan and extra fuel just in case I catch one) or a bear canister (which I generally use for only one trip a year, with my son#3 and the grandkids).

    I agree with Brian that a lot of published gear lists seem to be missing stuff. A lot of that is in the "small item" category. It may be that the little items are just lumped together. Personally, I prefer a detailed itemized list. It's amazing how much weight saving can be achieved with these small items--a half-ounce here and a quarter ounce there do eventually add up to a pound!


    Edited by OregonMouse (12/30/10 05:08 PM)
    _________________________
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

    Top
    #157566 - 11/16/11 05:38 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: OregonMouse]
    wildthing Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/11/02
    Posts: 982
    Loc: Victoria, B.C.
    6lb Base Weight Achieved!
    Oregon Mouse, I credit you and the the other posters in this topic for getting me where I am today...way down the trail! Here's my new list, just received my new backpack last week:

    Six Moon Designs Swift Pack (18oz)
    Tarptent (homemade double) (32oz)
    Marmot Hydrogen Long Bag (24 oz)
    POE Elite Sleeping Pad (15oz)
    Total Base Weight 5 1/2 lbs

    Now if I can score the Hennesy Hyperlite Asym Classic Hammock at 25oz, I can get er down to 5lbs!!! Need to cough $250 to do that. I'm really happy with the little Swift, tried it with 20 lbs and it was pretty good. But it carries very well with my base weight and 7 days of food which with water should be 18+ lbs!!
    _________________________
    Listen to the trees in the wind

    Top
    #157588 - 11/16/11 09:22 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: wildthing]
    Kent W Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/15/09
    Posts: 607
    Loc: IL.
    I have a Hennesey Hyperlight asym zip. Very happy with it, Snake skins add a bit. You no linger need a comfortable pad just insulation. Good luck.

    Top
    #158893 - 12/18/11 10:34 AM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: BrianLe]
    wildthing Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/11/02
    Posts: 982
    Loc: Victoria, B.C.
    BrianLe, I couldn't agree more about geography and conditions affecting your base weight. As I'm your neighbor to the north here in British Columbia, we share a fair amount of northwest style conditions. My base weight is always going to be a little meatier than someone from California's as I'm factoring in raingear and warmer weather clothing.

    What I have found is that one jacket, the Marmot Windshirt, has been pretty much all I needed for most of the conditions I run across outside of a lot of time at higher elevations. Due to snow and cold at the passes, I also take a down vest and it can be a little cool sometimes, but doable.

    Your mileage may vary, but a 6lb big 4 and a 12lb base weight gets me to roughly the right place of comfort and carrying ability of the current pack.

    Kent, I have more research to do with hammocks...first I need to find someone local to let me try and set theirs up!


    Edited by wildthing (12/18/11 10:36 AM)
    _________________________
    Listen to the trees in the wind

    Top
    #158894 - 12/18/11 10:54 AM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: wildthing]
    lori Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/22/08
    Posts: 2801
    Have you ever actually hiked in California? It's not sunshine and palm trees everywhere, y'know. It's actually below freezing at night most of the places you can backpack, and right now it's freezing in the central valley, which means it's probably subzero up in the high country. Our SAR packs are on standby because it hasn't really dumped the annual snowpack yet and we are guessing that folks are going to get themselves stuck out there any day, pushing their luck with three season stuff. The snowshoes, snow pants, snow probes and shovels are sitting by the door, the extra layers in the pack, and the snow cat is fueled and ready to deploy. Any time now the call will come at 2 am and we'll be running cold water over the windshields to get the ice off 'em to head up the hill, chain up, and grind off toward the command post. (There was ice on my car yesterday. Not much, but more than people think Californians should have.)

    Over on the coast, it's not foggy so much as it is frosty and cold. By February they will have snow down to 3,000 feet - at most an inch or two, and quickly melted. But it'll probably freak out tourists.

    Florida, now, there's a place winter never really goes...
    _________________________
    "In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

    http://hikeandbackpack.com

    Top
    #159460 - 01/02/12 11:05 AM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: lori]
    wildthing Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/11/02
    Posts: 982
    Loc: Victoria, B.C.
    "Have you ever actually hiked in California?" True, I haven't. I've listened to lots of lightweight backpackers from CA talk about their 5lb baseweights! You're right Lori, I should have said "3-season" California as the mountains do get nice and chilly in the winter and where you get elevation it will be snowy.

    Right now it is 3C here in Victoria, or about 38F (across the water from Seattle)and it is damp and cold. In the mountains I can see from my house, there is snow.

    I also noticed that Arizona gets some nice winter up at the north rim of the Canyon so only Florida is immune.

    One day I do want to tour the Sierras with my new gear. Depending on the month, I do believe I'd take my down vest there too! However, I'm much too old and wise to bother with winter camping anymore, let it be spring before I get on the trail!!
    _________________________
    Listen to the trees in the wind

    Top
    #159476 - 01/02/12 03:43 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: wildthing]
    PerryMK Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/18/02
    Posts: 1156
    Loc: Florida panhandle
    Originally Posted By wildthing
    I also noticed that Arizona gets some nice winter up at the north rim of the Canyon so only Florida is immune.

    Hey, it was all the way down to 46F (8C) when I went out for a short hike this morning and it probably won't get past 70F (21C) all day. It's forecast to get even cooler in a day or two. Don't tell me we don't get winter!


    (just joking of course)

    Top
    #159567 - 01/03/12 08:16 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: PerryMK]
    wandering_daisy Offline
    member

    Registered: 01/11/06
    Posts: 2752
    Loc: California
    I have had plenty of sub-freezing nights in the high Sierra in August. If you plan on camping high (say 11,000 feet) you need to be prepared for temperaturs into the mid-20's (F). There have been seasons where I got rained on only one night. There have been other seasons where I got rained on several days in a row on several different trips. What I have found is that in the Sierra, you almost always have sunshine after a rain, so you can dry out. Rain storms can be intense and severe, but you will not likely get a week of solid rain and drizzle. I sleep cold and have never regretted having a 10-15 degreeF sleeping bag. However, I do not see a need for tent, other than the luxury of it. I have done many 10+ day trips with my bivy sack.

    Top
    #159597 - 01/04/12 01:36 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: wandering_daisy]
    OregonMouse Offline
    member

    Registered: 02/03/06
    Posts: 6401
    Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
    With a warm enough pad, I can take my 20*F Western Mountaineering Ultralight down to 10*F. That's wearing my non-breathable rain jacket and pants over my base layer as a vapor barrier, and all my insulating clothing on top of the vapor barrier.

    I don't think I'd like to sleep out in a bivy, though, unless I also had a tarp. More important, I need a bug-free shelter for my dog!



    Edited by OregonMouse (01/04/12 01:37 PM)
    _________________________
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

    Top
    #161820 - 02/07/12 12:09 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: hikerduane]
    ConnieD Offline
    newbie

    Registered: 09/24/09
    Posts: 7
    Loc: Montana
    I have been looking at Hyperlight Mountain Gear HMG Ice Pack for weight carried (eg. water) or HMG Porter (for fluffy gear). There is a discussion about his proprietary cuben here

    I have recently purchased an Oware AsymTarp 1 and I am thinking I will purchase a Ti-Goat Raven Omni to pack to less volume than my OR Bug Bivy, to make more room for food for more nights out.

    I like sleeping quilts. The design and performance just gets better.
    _________________________
    Do more with less http://ultralightbackpackingonline.info

    Top
    #163021 - 02/29/12 02:05 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: ConnieD]
    Kent W Offline
    member

    Registered: 10/15/09
    Posts: 607
    Loc: IL.
    I was on Mountainsmith website last week they are making the Ghost again! I think it is a bit heavy but it is available.

    Top
    #163175 - 03/02/12 10:10 PM Re: Dropping to 12lb Pack Weight [Re: wildthing]
    Jim M Offline
    member

    Registered: 11/23/03
    Posts: 267
    Loc: Kitsap Peninsula, WA
    I think this begs the question, "how much additional weight is really significant." My guess is that 68% of backpackers (all ages and conditioning) carry a base weight of between 19.5 and 47.5 pounds. At 16 pounds you are still probably in the 1 or 2% of the lightest. On week summer trips I share a 2 pound tarp-tent (Squall)with a friend. I have a 800 gram (Lafuma) sleeping bag and sleep on a 14 ounce ridge-rest mat. Colin Fletcher says pare the weight down unmercifully, but if you need it, take it. I currently have my base weight down to 13 pounds. (age 71, 179lbs 5-9)
    _________________________
    Jim M

    Top
    Page 2 of 2 < 1 2

    Shout Box

    Highest Quality Lightweight Down Sleeping Bags
     
    Western Mountaineering Sleeping Bags
     
    Lite Gear Talk - Featured Topics
    Butane Stove
    by Jim M
    12/15/17 08:05 PM
    Knife, Fire Starter, Ignition Source
    by Jim M
    12/11/17 07:34 PM
    Bivvy bag with wired peak
    by Petro1234
    12/10/17 01:06 PM
    Backcountry Discussion - Featured Topics
    Greetings - and a question
    by valongi
    12/11/17 11:35 AM
    Just found out about UCO candles
    by toddfw2003
    11/30/17 08:41 AM
    Hitting the eagle rock loop, Ark in 3 days
    by toddfw2003
    11/19/17 11:31 AM
    Make Your Own Gear - Featured Topics
    Plant based insulation...
    by billstephenson
    11/18/17 02:58 PM
    lightest grommets to use
    by toddfw2003
    10/22/17 06:13 PM
    avalibility of thin ti rod
    by the-gr8t-waldo
    01/26/17 04:45 PM
    Featured Photos
    Breakneck Ridge, New York
    May 2012 Eclipse, Lassen Park
    New Years Eve 2011
    Trip Report with Photos
    Seven Devils, Idaho
    Oat Hill Mine Trail 2012
    Dark Canyon - Utah
    Who's Online
    0 registered (), 21 Guests and 0 Spiders online.
    Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
    Newest Members
    runningman55, ponchoman, valongi, Atkinson J, Dcarpenter
    12471 Registered Users
    Forum Links
    Disclaimer
    Policies
    Site Links
    HOME
    Backpacking.net
    Family Hiking
    Lightweight Gear Store
    Backpacking Book Store
    Lightweight Zone
    Hiking Essentials

    Outdoor Gear Daily Deals
    Outlets, Sales, Bargains

    Our long-time Sponsor, BackcountryGear.com - The leading source for ultralite/lightweight outdoor gear:

    Backcountry Forum
     
     

    Since 1996 - the Original Backcountry Forum
    Copyright © The Lightweight Backpacker & BackcountryForum.com