Backcountry Forum
Backpacking & Hiking Gear

Backcountry Forum
Our long-time Sponsor - the leading source for ultralite/lightweight outdoor gear
 
 
 
Backcountry Gear Clearance and Sale

Amazon.com
Backpacking Forums
BackcountryGear.com
backcountry gear

---- Our Gear Store ----
The Lightweight Gear Store
 
 ULTRA-LIGHT 

Ultralight Backpacks
Ultralight Bivy Sacks
Ultralight Shelters
Ultralight Tarps
Ultralight Tents
Ultralight Raingear
Ultralight Stoves & Cookware
Ultralight Down Sleeping Bags
Ultralight Synthetic Sleep Bags
Ultralight Apparel


the Titanium Page
WM Extremelite Sleeping Bags

 CAMPING & HIKING 

Backpacks
Tents
Sleeping Bags
Hydration
Kitchen
Accessories

 CLIMBING 

Ropes & Cordage
Protection & Hardware
Carabiners & Quickdraws
Climbing Packs & Bags
Big Wall
Rescue & Industrial

 MEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 WOMEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 FOOTWEAR 

Men's Footwear
Women's Footwear

 CLEARANCE 

Backpacks
Mens Apparel
Womens Apparel
Climbing
Footwear
Accessories

 BRANDS 

Black Diamond
Granite Gear
La Sportiva
Osprey
Smartwool

 WAYS TO SHOP 

Sale
Clearance
Top Brands
All Brands

 Backpacking Equipment 

Shelters
BackPacks
Sleeping Bags
Water Treatment
Kitchen
Hydration
Climbing


 Backcountry Gear Clearance


 WINTER CAMPING 

Shelters
Bivy Bags
Sleeping Bags
Sleeping Pads
Snow Sports
Winter Kitchen

 SNOWSPORTS 

Snowshoes
Avalanche Gear
Skins
Hats, Gloves, & Gaiters
Accessories

Stay Healthy--Eat Well

MARY JANES FARM ORGANIC MEALS

Mary Janes Farm Organic Backcountry Meals

NATURAL HIGH GOURMET MEALS

Natural High

 

Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#149291 - 04/16/11 05:19 AM Another newbie with questions
dragonictigeron Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/16/11
Posts: 13
Loc: Illinois
Hey everyone! I am a backpacking newbie, though have done short hikes. I am planning a couple backpacking trips with my father this July and August. The first one will be a trial/ shakedown trip for 2 nights and 3 days on a short trail nearby called "The Red Trail". The second will be a 1 week trip on "The River to River Trail". We do have a couple local outfitters I plan to support and ask questions from,but I would like some other opinions. So here is my questions: What are some good resources to learn about gear? What are suggestions on what to pack for a 1 week trip? What is a good range for good gear that dont break the bank? Opinions on Osprey Aether 70 Packs?

Thank you everyone!

Brandon

ps some background info; I am a 27 yr old male, 5'5" and will weigh about 160is lbs by then

Top
#149292 - 04/16/11 09:57 AM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
balzaccom Online   content
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 1718
Loc: Napa, CA
First of all, Welcome. Always good to see new people here, and new people joining the sport!

Second of all, do a little search on this site. You'll find whole sections devoted to answering just those sorts of questions, and the answers reflect the combined wisdom of all the people on these boards---much better than any one of us trying to write out a few notes for you.

And our website, linked below, has some of that info as well, specifically for summer in the Sierra Nevada

_________________________
balzaccom

check out our website and blog: http://www.backpackthesierra.com/home

Top
#149299 - 04/16/11 01:36 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
BrianLe Offline
member

Registered: 02/26/07
Posts: 1143
Loc: Washington State, King County
Mark Verber has done a really good job of laying out options; I think a person could do far worse than start out looking at what he has to say about various gear bits.

What you might do is go to a local outfitter and sort of kick the tires, get a sense for what's out there, then go online and read some reviews about gear that you find yourself interested in, and read through Mark's stuff on that category.

That's if you're the go-slow, analytical type who researches every purchase carefully. Alternatively, go out and buy a bunch of stuff at random and then start fine tuning from there ...

Another thought is to rent (or borrow) some gear to get a sense for what you find works well for you.
_________________________
Brian Lewis
http://postholer.com/brianle

Top
#149300 - 04/16/11 01:58 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: BrianLe]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6369
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
There are also a lot of articles for those new to backpacking or those who want to lighten their loads on the home page of this site. Look in the left-hand column. The gear lists there helped me cut my total pack weight by more than half without any sacrifice of comfort or safety.

Renting or borrowing, as suggested, is an excellent way to start. I also recommend the Mark Verber website for more detailed information about the types of gear that are out there.


Edited by OregonMouse (04/16/11 02:01 PM)
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

Top
#149301 - 04/16/11 01:59 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
A lot of people give the age, weight and so forth when what matters more is your budget, what weight range you want to carry, the comfort level you're striving for, where you want to go, and what weather conditions you expect to encounter. That has a lot more to do with the gear choices than anything else.

You may not know what weight to expect for backpacking gear... look at Mark Verber's site, and read the gear lists and articles on the main page of this site, and keep reading forum posts. Rent and borrow gear. Find a hiking group in your area and talk to other backpackers in person. That'll also give you people to borrow from. Get sized for a pack, and start looking at weather forecasts in the areas you want to visit, get an idea of expected night temps, etc.

ETA: Beware REI syndrome. Newbies who rely on the outfitter to give them what they need will show up with much, much more than they need, and quickly figure out that 50 lbs is not quite ideal. A basic gear list from this site and a good look at trailcooking.com will help you sort that out a lot more cheaply.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

Top
#149302 - 04/16/11 02:27 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: lori]
skysail Offline
member

Registered: 01/30/11
Posts: 17
Loc: chicago
Are those trails your talkin about in Illinois? Im looking for trails to hike around northern Illinois.

Top
#149303 - 04/16/11 02:44 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
aimless Offline
Moderator

Registered: 02/05/03
Posts: 2835
Loc: Portland, OR
To my mind, the best approach is to grasp the fundamentals of what you need and why you need it, then you fill in the slots marked "pack", "food", "water", "shelter", "bed", and so on.

How you fill those slots will depend on a lot of factors: what you already own that fills the need, what you can afford to buy, personal preferences or quirks, and don't forget to consider how heavy it is.

Buying a lot of expensive gear right away is usually a poor approach, unless you have plenty of money to throw around. Most of us long timers began packing on a shoestring and have accumulated our gear slowly, the same way we accumulated our trail experience.

Many here will counsel you not to buy cheap, but to get the very best you can afford, to buy gear that will last for a decade or two and give you lasting benefit and pleasure. That philosophy works very well once you discover that backpacking is your cup of tea, a pasttime you're sure you will be doing for decades.

After a few trips, you'll know if this is true for you, even if those trips seem (outwardly) to others to have been fiascos -- to you they will just be a foretaste of coming delights, once you've mastered the details. My first trip was a fiasco of major proportions, but it hooked me for life.

So, my advice is to do as much research as you can, so you know what the choices are, but for your first trip especially, allow yourself to improvise and cobble together your kit, knowing it is not ideal.

Keep the weight down as much as possible. The biggest trap that newbies fall into is imagining a whole series of disasters and taking 15 lbs of stuff "for emergencies" that don't materialize. Just cover your most basic needs, as simply as possible, then stop.

Don't succumb to the pleas of well-meaning friends and family members who plead with you to "at least take this, in case...". The last piece of that sentence can be anyting from "you get snowed on" to "you get attacked by bears" to "you break a leg". It is not your job to carry their worries on your back. Your load will be heavy enough without them.

Good luck. I hope the experiment 'takes' and you join the lucky few who love this sport for a lifetime. As Dr. Suess said, "oh the paces you'll go!"

Top
#149304 - 04/16/11 03:13 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: aimless]
Whiskeyguy Offline
member

Registered: 06/11/09
Posts: 103
Loc: Northern California, USA
I agree with everyone else... the first thing is to read as much as possible. This allows you to benefit from everyone's mistakes and experience, and this site is a great place to start. You could also watch some Youtube videos of gear lists and gear reviews to get an idea of what's out there. Visit REI, Amazon, etc (even if you're supporting local businesses) and read reviews for as much gear as you can... I find it's better to know what you're looking for before you walk into the outfitters... there at best you have the advice of a couple of people, on the internet you have the advice of thousands.

While keeping the weight down as much as possible is important, personally I don't think that's your biggest concern for your first few trips (especially if they're short ones). You won't have a great idea of what you need and don't need until after you start. My goal has always been to try and keep my weight per night at or below my previous trip. As you learn more about necessities and (if you get into backpacking more) supplement your gear with lighter, more expensive gear in the future you'll begin cutting weight. I think a good goal is to shoot for a pack that weighs 1/4 your body weight.

Buy a food scale capable of weighing to the tenths of ounces (a cheap one will do) and learn to use Excel or the Google Docs free equivalent. If you have excel I can provide you with a spreadsheet, then you enter the weight of all your gear with a corresponding checklist and play around with different configurations to find the lightest weight possible... this helped me a lot.

Learn to start looking a weight when you buy gear... I'm sure that's the first thing a lot of people here look at. 4 ounces may not seem like a lot, but if you save 4 ounces on every piece of gear you own it adds up to pounds.

Go pick up backpacking food and start trying it out at home (using whatever stove you decide on) so you know what you like. I really like Mountain House, and there are some great recipes for dehydrated food on this site.

Most importantly, enjoy yourself and the process. The planning phase should be one of the funnest.

Top
#149306 - 04/16/11 04:27 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: skysail]
dragonictigeron Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/16/11
Posts: 13
Loc: Illinois
It is in Southern Illinois, there are quite a few trails here.

I thank you guys for all the tips and will definately be looking at all the information.

My budget isn't huge but I will be piece by piece buying items.

If anyone has suggestions or questions let me know


Edited by dragonictigeron (04/16/11 04:34 PM)
Edit Reason: added info

Top
#149308 - 04/16/11 04:48 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: skysail]
Kent W Offline
member

Registered: 10/15/09
Posts: 607
Loc: IL.
Originally Posted By skysail
Are those trails your talkin about in Illinois? Im looking for trails to hike around northern Illinois.

Kettle Morane state Park. The Ice age trail in southern Wi. Mississipi Palasades State Park in North west IL has acouple remote sites but hike is minimal? Good to test gear. Southern Il. Has Shawnee Nat Forest with Excellent reveiws. Not much here in the flatland but blactopbike paths!

Top
#149309 - 04/16/11 05:44 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: Kent W]
bigwaterbill Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/13/11
Posts: 6
I too agree with the others! Here are some tips that could help: Ask at the store if you can try gear out. Go to the store with a lot of time at you disposal! Put on some packs, load them up with 30lbs, and leave them on for 30 minutes or so, walk around the parking lot, go for a hike if the store is cool with it. This will help you to figure out which ones are really comfortable; they will all be comfortable for three minutes, so you need to wear it to find out the straps hurt your shoulders or the hip belt rubs or the pack is too long, etc. Also, grab some gear from the store you think you might take. Pack it in the backpack. See what one has the pocket features etc that you like.Try to do the same with stoves. See what ones you like. Use them in the parking lot if the storewill let you.

PS. I have the Osprey Cresent and love it, but you may not

Top
#149310 - 04/16/11 05:54 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: bigwaterbill]
bigwaterbill Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/13/11
Posts: 6
PSS - The pack, shelter and boots are the things IMO that will make the trip enjoyable or horrible! If the pack and boots are not comfortable, every mile will seem like an eternity. If the shelter is not dry, too big or small, poorly ventilated, or totally falls apart, you will have a lowsy night! I would focus my time and money really examining these in the store and reading reviews. Again, try them out, set up the tent in the store, get in it, etc. The rest of the gear questions will be answered with experience and exposure to fellow backpackers' gear. As you get into the sport, you will know exactly what you want to buy. So - my advice - focus and money on shelter, pack and boots. Get other stuff on the cheap while you figure out what you want, what you don't need and the brands you love.

Top
#149315 - 04/17/11 12:50 AM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
dragonictigeron Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/16/11
Posts: 13
Loc: Illinois
I did a search and didn't really find anything on the Vibram Fivefingers KSO shoes, what are your opinions on them?

Top
#149316 - 04/17/11 01:44 AM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
Originally Posted By dragonictigeron
I did a search and didn't really find anything on the Vibram Fivefingers KSO shoes, what are your opinions on them?


good water shoes, bad backpacking shoes. Wouldn't wear them in the mountains.

I hiked with someone who wore them often - he said they didn't provide nearly the protection for the bottoms of his feet and reverted to trail runners. Get a sharp object between the toes and you'll be in pain. It's just mesh in there.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

Top
#149323 - 04/17/11 08:09 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
Glenn Offline
member

Registered: 03/08/06
Posts: 2617
Loc: Ohio
I'm a latecomer to this thread - I was out hiking this weekend, and just got home.

In addition to all the great information everyone else gave you, a good book never hurts. I'd highly recommend Karen Berger's Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide. It's a good, basic book that's fairly balanced between "lightweight" and "traditional" gear and style recommendations. If you're defintely wanting to go toward the lightweight end of the spectrum, her Hiking Light Handbook is a very balanced and accessible manual, too.

As far as your question about the Aether 70, it's a great pack - if you're planning to carry 40 or 50 pounds of traditional (i.e., bulky) gear and do some winter camping. If you're more traditional, and can hold to a load of 30 pounds or less, take a look at the Osprey Kestrel series (probably the 58 or 68), which weigh a pound and a half less, but have fairly equivalent feature sets and robust, adjustable suspensions. I used a Kestrel 58 for a 32 pound load of traditional gear (Hubba tent, Thermarest pad, stainless steel pots, white gas stove, fleece jacket, etc.), and always found it comfortable. I replaced it with a Kestrel 48 as my load lightened to under 25 pounds (Carbon Reflex tent, Pocket Rocket and Titan kettle, NeoAir, down jacket, etc.) and found it equally comfortable (the lighter load was also more comfortable.)

Get the rest of your gear figured out first, though - then buy the right-sized pack with the supportive-enough suspension to hold it all and ride comfortably. If it's the Aether, you won't be sorry, either.

Top
#149325 - 04/17/11 09:49 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: Glenn]
dragonictigeron Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/16/11
Posts: 13
Loc: Illinois
The reason I was looking at the Aether 70 was per local outfitter suggestion plus the fact am potentially going to do the AT within a few years. But I am thinking the Aether 60 or maybe smaller. I am wanting light but I'm not sure about Ultra- Light.

I am picking up books as I can, I am big into planning and researching before I buy items such as gear. It is hard deciding since there is so much out there.

Top
#149328 - 04/17/11 10:57 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
Originally Posted By dragonictigeron
The reason I was looking at the Aether 70 was per local outfitter suggestion plus the fact am potentially going to do the AT within a few years. But I am thinking the Aether 60 or maybe smaller. I am wanting light but I'm not sure about Ultra- Light.


If I were doing the AT I would be as close to ultralight as I could get, and take my tarp and hammock. The ease of resupply makes it possible. I'd use my 40 liter pack and have room to spare... Length of trip has less to do with size of the pack, the only variable is the amount of food you carry. The only increase in weight for me is in food - but I don't have easy resupply spots where I go.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

Top
#149329 - 04/18/11 12:41 AM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: lori]
dragonictigeron Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/16/11
Posts: 13
Loc: Illinois
Originally Posted By lori
Originally Posted By dragonictigeron
The reason I was looking at the Aether 70 was per local outfitter suggestion plus the fact am potentially going to do the AT within a few years. But I am thinking the Aether 60 or maybe smaller. I am wanting light but I'm not sure about Ultra- Light.


If I were doing the AT I would be as close to ultralight as I could get, and take my tarp and hammock. The ease of resupply makes it possible. I'd use my 40 liter pack and have room to spare... Length of trip has less to do with size of the pack, the only variable is the amount of food you carry. The only increase in weight for me is in food - but I don't have easy resupply spots where I go.


First will be the 3 day and 1 week trips, after that I don't know exactly. I am not comfy with a tarp tent because of all the bugs where I live so I plan on a solo tent, though I think a tarp tent may be what I like. So having said that what would be a normal pack weight and how big of a pack would work well? and options on tent?


Also I asked my father, who has been interested in backpacking but never done it, if he had any books to read and he pulls out a copy of "The Complete Walker IV" by Colin Fletcher and Chip Rowling. So I have some good reading to do.

Top
#149330 - 04/18/11 07:26 AM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
Glenn Offline
member

Registered: 03/08/06
Posts: 2617
Loc: Ohio
Your dad has wonderful tastes in books. I've read all 4 Complete Walkers as they came out, and they helped me make better-informed decisions over the years. Sometimes the amount of detail can be overwhelming, but it's all thorough and well-grounded. You can't get much better.

Just remember it's primarily oriented toward backpacking in the western US, so some of the techniques and gear suggestions (such as four-season tents and how much water to carry) might be overkill for those of us who hike in the eastern US. (Berger's books have a bit more information about hiking in the eastern US, which is why I usually recommend them to beginners. But Fletcher is still my personal favorite.)

The Aether 60 is only 2 liters larger than the Kestrel 58. Give them both a try before you buy; the local outfitter would probably let you bring in your gear to test-pack the pack, and let you carry the loaded pack around the store for awhile.

As far as tents, I prefer the MSR Carbon Reflex 1 (or, for half a pound more and $150 less, the MSR Hubba - identical in design, just not as light.) I've got friends that are equally passionate about their Big Agnes Fly Creek 1 and Copper Spur 1. And as others on these forums will tell you, TarpTents are an outstanding, roomy, lightweight option. (I prefer the CR1/Hubba because I can pitch it without the fly and have an all-mesh shelter on a hot, muggy, buggy August evening in Ohio. You can't do that with most TarpTents.)

Top
#149333 - 04/18/11 10:38 AM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
Have you looked at tarptents? They aren't tarps. They have bugnetting. People get them instead of tarps because of bugs.

Some of the tarptents do indeed adjust up and down to allow or curtail breezes, as well.

They do require proper setup - but all tents should be set up properly, without sagging, using stakes and enough guy out points that you get ventilation - otherwise you'll be getting a lot of condensation inside. Tents are sometimes used because the users think they will be warmer. Tents should not be considered additional warmth - rely on the sleeping bag and pad for that, ventilate the tent!
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

Top
#149352 - 04/18/11 05:38 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
dragonictigeron Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/16/11
Posts: 13
Loc: Illinois
I will read some of Berger's book so that will be next.

I hadn't looked too much at tarp tents, just tarps or tents. I will look at them a bit closer. As far as tents I am kinda liking the MSR Hubba. Still overwhelmed at prices though, but am getting over that.

Thanks for all the help.

Top
#149358 - 04/18/11 08:58 PM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
Steadman Offline
member

Registered: 09/17/09
Posts: 510
Loc: Virginia
dragoictigeron

There are a lot of varieties of tents, and you don't have to spend that much to get started.

I recently bought one of the many varieties of TarpTent and am quite pleased. 2.5 lbs for 3 people is awesome...and the price range is the same as the MSR Hubba tent you are eyeing up.

That said, you'd being doing yourself a disservice if you didn't spec out your requiments and shop "one up and one down" on Campmor's and REI's websites to see your other options. This site has a link to TarpTent on the header, as they are a cottage industry type manufaturer.

Steadman

Top
#149370 - 04/19/11 04:13 AM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
dragonictigeron Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/16/11
Posts: 13
Loc: Illinois
What are some suggestions on tarp tents? Opinions and facts on the Tarp Tent Contrail?

Top
#149378 - 04/19/11 10:36 AM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: dragonictigeron]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
Opinions and facts?

Pros? easy setup, light, roomy (I know a guy who uses one for himself and his hound dog), can use trekking poles in place of tent poles, sittin' up room.

Cons? some people think they're flimsy - some people don't like single wall - some folks have a lot of condensation on the inner wall because of where they go...

Have a look at the pics on the website to see all the places tarptents have been, tho. Watch some of Franco's videos (he should be along shortly.)

The non freestanding aspect bothers some. It doesn't bother me, maybe because my primary shelter is rigged between two trees and infinitely configurable. I know folks who successfully get through storms on open granite with nothing but a tarp, so my perspective is a bit skewed from the traditional "we must have a freestanding tent" crowd.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

Top
#149379 - 04/19/11 10:42 AM Re: Another newbie with questions [Re: lori]
Glenn Offline
member

Registered: 03/08/06
Posts: 2617
Loc: Ohio
Many years ago, I was part of the "must have freestanding" crowd, but the last 10 years or so, I've been in the "who cares" brigade. Non-freestanding tents, when staked out, are quite stable and comfortable. You can't pitch them on solid rock, though (but solid rock isn't that comfortable anyhow.)

The big thing is that freestanding tents usually have to be staked out, too, if you want to use the vestibules or maximize ventilation. The fly tends to sag against the pole structure if you don't stake it out with guy lines, and most vestibules have no pole structure.

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >

Shout Box

Highest Quality Lightweight Down Sleeping Bags
 
Western Mountaineering Sleeping Bags
 
Lite Gear Talk - Featured Topics
what is the lightest framed backpack around 40L
by toddfw2003
Yesterday at 07:23 PM
a worthy challenger to the msr pocket rocket2
by the-gr8t-waldo
Yesterday at 01:28 PM
Lowa Renegade Hiking boots
by HikeVibes
10/11/17 08:21 PM
Backcountry Discussion - Featured Topics
Napa Fires
by balzaccom
10/11/17 07:43 PM
Backpacking the Ouachita Trail thanksgiving
by toddfw2003
10/05/17 11:54 PM
Rockfalll on El Capitan in Yosemite
by balzaccom
09/28/17 09:47 AM
Make Your Own Gear - Featured Topics
alcohol stove comparisons
by Bike_packer
10/03/17 08:56 PM
Can footprint plasticizer harm tent ground-sheet?
by Weston1000
09/10/17 02:24 AM
Featured Photos
Breakneck Ridge, New York
May 2012 Eclipse, Lassen Park
New Years Eve 2011
Trip Report with Photos
Seven Devils, Idaho
Oat Hill Mine Trail 2012
Dark Canyon - Utah
Who's Online
2 registered (), 29 Guests and 0 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
Pasquale, Rahultravel, Tated, fester225, TwodoGz
12420 Registered Users
Forum Links
Disclaimer
Policies
Site Links
HOME
Backpacking.net
Family Hiking
Lightweight Gear Store
Backpacking Book Store
Lightweight Zone
Hiking Essentials

Outdoor Gear Daily Deals
Outlets, Sales, Bargains

Our long-time Sponsor, BackcountryGear.com - The leading source for ultralite/lightweight outdoor gear:

Backcountry Forum
 
 

Since 1996 - the Original Backcountry Forum
Copyright © The Lightweight Backpacker & BackcountryForum.com