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#144733 - 01/12/11 09:55 AM Pulk Sleds
Loomis Offline
member

Registered: 01/03/11
Posts: 35
Loc: Milwaukie, Oregon USA
Another member asked me to compare the two sleds I use as pulk sleds (gear sled pulled by man power), so I figure a new topic is in order.

My first pulk sled is a Paris Expedition. You can read my full review here with pictures.


My second and newer pulk sled is a Pelican Snow Trek 60. Full review with pictures.


Both sleds work well for getting gear into the backcountry in winter. The Pelican is my favored sled because it is wider and sturdier. This comes at a cost of weighing 10 pounds more than the Paris. It is also easier to attach poles on the Pelican as it has pre-molded attachment points versus the simple holes for rope on the Pelican. Both track straight, but the Paris is less prone to tip-overs on sloped trails due to it's wider stance and deeper tracks.

The Paris is much more commonly used as a pulk sled compared to the Pelican. The Pelican is primarily designed for use behind a snowmobile, but works great pulled by manpower alone. There is a wealth of information on the internet including http://www.skipulk.com where I found many ideas for my pulk sleds.

What pulk sleds are others using? Has anyone else used a Pelican?
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#144754 - 01/12/11 03:51 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: Loomis]
Heather-ak Offline
member

Registered: 07/11/10
Posts: 597
Loc: Fairbanks, AK
I greatly appreciate your reviews. Thank you for posting them.

Heather

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#144759 - 01/12/11 04:49 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: Loomis]
skcreidc Offline
member

Registered: 08/16/10
Posts: 1590
Loc: San Diego CA
Yes, as hhavel said thanks for the reviews. Good stuff.

sk

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#144762 - 01/12/11 05:38 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: Loomis]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
I used a pelican last year for an overnighter. I borrowed it from a friend. It has a lot of room and fits all my stuff very easily. However, I only pulled it on hard pack, not powder, so I need to try it on powder before I like it.
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#144764 - 01/12/11 06:22 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: Loomis]
Loomis Offline
member

Registered: 01/03/11
Posts: 35
Loc: Milwaukie, Oregon USA
I have pulled the Pelican on both powder and hard pack. For me it worked equally well. Since I am in Oregon all my trips have been in the mountains with fairly steep inclines and declines. I have not had any issues even with the Pelican being 10 lbs heavier.
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#144769 - 01/12/11 08:27 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: Loomis]
TomD Offline
Moderator

Registered: 10/30/03
Posts: 4963
Loc: Marina del Rey,CA
Here's my old sled. I think there are more pictures of it here somewhere.


Unfortunately, it is pretty tippy, so I got rid of it. I think a Paris would be much better.
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#144849 - 01/14/11 12:20 AM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: Loomis]
Loomis Offline
member

Registered: 01/03/11
Posts: 35
Loc: Milwaukie, Oregon USA
I just created a how-to article on the pulk poles I am using with my Pelican Snow Trek 60. It's over at WinterCampers.com.
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#144852 - 01/14/11 02:29 AM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: Loomis]
TomD Offline
Moderator

Registered: 10/30/03
Posts: 4963
Loc: Marina del Rey,CA
Mine are somewhat similar. I used Schedule 40 PVC, six feet long, glued end caps with an eye bolt through them-no rope down the middle, clipped them onto my pack belt with biners and to the sled with oval screw links.



This picture is from a trip in 2007 to Yosemite. I now have a huge duffel bag that holds everything.


Edited by TomD (01/14/11 02:35 AM)
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#144855 - 01/14/11 08:30 AM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: TomD]
Loomis Offline
member

Registered: 01/03/11
Posts: 35
Loc: Milwaukie, Oregon USA
TomD - Is that 3/4" SCH 40 PVC? Have you ever had an issue with the poles fracturing or breaking?
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#144857 - 01/14/11 08:54 AM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: Loomis]
skcreidc Offline
member

Registered: 08/16/10
Posts: 1590
Loc: San Diego CA
I gotta say that there are some really interesting threads in this forum now. More on topic though, I understand why Loomis is using the sch 40 PVC (rope through center) but TomD, if you don't have the rope why not go for sch 80? That is what I was thinking of making them out of.

sk

btw, the wintercamping.com site was good, for a backcountry ethics question in particular. I will get to that soon.


Edited by skcreidc (01/14/11 08:55 AM)

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#144873 - 01/14/11 04:21 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: skcreidc]
TomD Offline
Moderator

Registered: 10/30/03
Posts: 4963
Loc: Marina del Rey,CA
Mine are 1/2" ID Schedule 40, which for what I was using them for, strong enough. No problem with them breaking. I picked Sched 40 because it is so much lighter and a little bit of flexibilty doesn't seem to matter. I didn't bother with the rope idea because I didn't think of it. I did have one of the eye bolts come loose on my last trip, so I will have to cut the end off and redo it, but rope might work better, so I may consider trying that.

Ed (the ski pulk website guy) uses marine stainless hardware, but ordinary stuff from Home Depot works just as well for anything less than big expedition style sledding from my experience.

What kind of line are you using? I'm thinking something like 4-6 mm climbing rope?


Edited by TomD (01/14/11 04:23 PM)
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#144874 - 01/14/11 04:47 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: TomD]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
Originally Posted By TomD
Mine are 1/2" ID Schedule 40, which for what I was using them for, strong enough. No problem with them breaking. I picked Sched 40 because it is so much lighter and a little bit of flexibilty doesn't seem to matter. I didn't bother with the rope idea because I didn't think of it. I did have one of the eye bolts come loose on my last trip, so I will have to cut the end off and redo it, but rope might work better, so I may consider trying that.

Ed (the ski pulk website guy) uses marine stainless hardware, but ordinary stuff from Home Depot works just as well for anything less than big expedition style sledding from my experience.

What kind of line are you using? I'm thinking something like 4-6 mm climbing rope?


Tom, if you are redoing it the same way as the first time, I would suggest using a locking nut, or an adhesive on the threads to lock the nut. That should keep it from coming loose.
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#144889 - 01/14/11 10:46 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: finallyME]
TomD Offline
Moderator

Registered: 10/30/03
Posts: 4963
Loc: Marina del Rey,CA
Good advice. I had lock washers on them, but one came loose. If I do it the same way, I will use some Lock-tite next time. I'm thinking the rope through the pole might be more reliable for a cheap setup.


Edited by TomD (01/14/11 10:47 PM)
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#144912 - 01/15/11 12:53 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: TomD]
skcreidc Offline
member

Registered: 08/16/10
Posts: 1590
Loc: San Diego CA
Now, this is from what I have been reading only, but it sounds like flexibility is a good thing. Especially when nigotiating through the trees. Rope through the middle seems like a good idea to me also. Even if the PVC breaks, it is unlikely to shatter and the rope will still hold it together.

sk

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#144920 - 01/15/11 02:52 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: skcreidc]
TomD Offline
Moderator

Registered: 10/30/03
Posts: 4963
Loc: Marina del Rey,CA
The guys on wintertrekking don't bother with poles for the most part. They are hauling heavy, long tobaggans on mostly flat ground, but often through boreal forests around trees so they just use ropes. Check out the wintertrekking website for pictures. They will also lead with the tobaggan on downhills so they don't get run over with it and can control the speed of it.

Rope running through a pole would be helpful if it broke-you could just duct tape it together. When the eyebolt on mine came off, I just used some line I had with me to wrap around the pole and make a loop for a temporary fix. Worked fine.
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#144925 - 01/15/11 04:42 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: TomD]
skcreidc Offline
member

Registered: 08/16/10
Posts: 1590
Loc: San Diego CA
So...and I'm guessing they are not getting rear ended with their tobaggans? That is what I liked about the poles. It seems to be more functional for up and down terrain, keeping whatever you are pulling away from your body. The video short of igloo Ed comming up and over the fairly steep rise is a perfect example of what I am talking about. I'm thinking, without the poles, the pulk would be temporarily out of control.

Duct tape goodjob

sk

(Thinking)...of course if the toboggan is that heavy, you would not be dragging it in that kind of up and down terrain. Then it might be dogsled time. But, one small step at a time...


Edited by skcreidc (01/15/11 04:47 PM)

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#146006 - 02/07/11 12:01 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: finallyME]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
I just bought an otter sled for $30. It was on clearance at the local farm store. I have a trip planned on the 18th to test it out.



Otter Sled


Edited by finallyME (02/07/11 12:01 PM)
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#146028 - 02/07/11 08:20 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: finallyME]
phat Offline
Moderator

Registered: 06/24/07
Posts: 4107
Loc: Alberta, Canada
How Heavy is it? it looks good, I'm just concerned about the weight (My "sled" occasionally gets carried on my back)
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#146040 - 02/07/11 10:53 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: skcreidc]
TomD Offline
Moderator

Registered: 10/30/03
Posts: 4963
Loc: Marina del Rey,CA
Originally Posted By skcreidc
So...and I'm guessing they are not getting rear ended with their tobaggans? That is what I liked about the poles. It seems to be more functional for up and down terrain, keeping whatever you are pulling away from your body. The video short of igloo Ed comming up and over the fairly steep rise is a perfect example of what I am talking about. I'm thinking, without the poles, the pulk would be temporarily out of control.

Duct tape goodjob

sk

(Thinking)...of course if the toboggan is that heavy, you would not be dragging it in that kind of up and down terrain. Then it might be dogsled time. But, one small step at a time...


The winter trekking campers are rarely in hilly territory; if they are, they let the sled down in front of them (I've seen pics of this on the site). They are often using very long tobaggans, 8-10 feet made from plastic with wooden cross pieces. There are lots of pics and how to's in the forums. They are often pulling 80 lbs of gear across lakes and open land-big tents, stoves, axes, boxes of food. Nowhere near lightweight backpacking at all.

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#146048 - 02/08/11 02:09 AM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: TomD]
phat Offline
Moderator

Registered: 06/24/07
Posts: 4107
Loc: Alberta, Canada
I get what the wintertrekking guys do.. If you're snowshoeing, it's often easier to have a hand on the rope going down hills, this is what I do (even in hilly country). Although for truly "problematic" terrain my winter rig is basically a 90 litre huge pack upside down on a pelican sled, so while I normally pull it, it's not too tough to pick it up, put it on my shoulders, and carry it as a big ol' pack for a little while (with the sled still lashed on). Your sled looks perfect for that techique tom, assuming you have a big ol' monster pack somewhere (it's the only time I use the big 90 litre beast)


skiiing of course, you probably want pulk style poles.


Edited by phat (02/08/11 02:12 AM)
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#146059 - 02/08/11 10:12 AM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: phat]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
The manufacturer claims it is around 12 lbs. I was considering an option to carry it, but decided that as long as I can carry all the contents in the sled, then dragging and empty sled is no problem. Right now I don't have a huge pack that can fit my sleeping bag and other stuff. Mostly because my sleeping bag is so dang big. I would guess it takes up about 65 liters alone. I do have an external pack frame that doesn't have a pack bag on it. My plan it to just strap on the sleeping bag and duffel to the frame if I need to.
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#146078 - 02/08/11 02:20 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: TomD]
skcreidc Offline
member

Registered: 08/16/10
Posts: 1590
Loc: San Diego CA
Sorry Tom, I should of pulled that post. I think I probably drank too much coffee the day I read your previous post. When I re-read it I noticed you had already answered the question I was asking.

FinallyME...that pulk looks heavy duty. Like it can really take some abuse.

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#146135 - 02/08/11 10:51 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: skcreidc]
TomD Offline
Moderator

Registered: 10/30/03
Posts: 4963
Loc: Marina del Rey,CA
No worries. Phat, I got rid of the sled-tipped over too easily and sold my skis too. I may go back to snowshoes and try going lighter so I don't need a sled, if I get back out this winter. Not a lot of snow around here this winter (meaning the local mountains).
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#146155 - 02/09/11 02:35 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: Loomis]
Loomis Offline
member

Registered: 01/03/11
Posts: 35
Loc: Milwaukie, Oregon USA
FinallyME - your pulk looks very similar to my Pelican Snow Trek 60 which is indeed heavy duty. Mine weighs 15 pounds and after loading it up, it weighs about 100 pounds. It's sturdy enough to be pulled behind a snowmobile (which I don't have).
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#146209 - 02/10/11 02:59 PM Re: Pulk Sleds [Re: Loomis]
TomC Offline
newbie

Registered: 02/10/11
Posts: 4
Loc: SE. Michigan
So far I have only used mine to pull one or two kids. I used the typical PCV/rope. I used a fairly durable sled that came from a garage sale. I made a belt for attachment. I have been able to easily pull the two kids (~60lbs.) with no issues.


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