Backcountry Forum

Make Your Own Gear

Amazon.com
Backpacking Forums
BackcountryGear.com
backcountry gear

---- Our Gear Store ----
The Lightweight Gear Store
 
 WINTER CAMPING 

Shelters
Bivy Bags
Sleeping Bags
Sleeping Pads
Snow Sports
Winter Kitchen

 SNOWSPORTS 

Snowshoes
Avalanche Gear
Skins
Hats, Gloves, & Gaiters
Accessories

 ULTRA-LIGHT 

Ultralight Backpacks
Ultralight Bivy Sacks
Ultralight Shelters
Ultralight Tarps
Ultralight Tents
Ultralight Raingear
Ultralight Stoves & Cookware
Ultralight Down Sleeping Bags
Ultralight Synthetic Sleep Bags
Ultralight Apparel


the Titanium Page
WM Extremelite Sleeping Bags

 CAMPING & HIKING 

Backpacks
Tents
Sleeping Bags
Hydration
Kitchen
Accessories

 CLIMBING 

Ropes & Cordage
Protection & Hardware
Carabiners & Quickdraws
Climbing Packs & Bags
Big Wall
Rescue & Industrial

 MEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 WOMEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 FOOTWEAR 

Men's Footwear
Women's Footwear

 CLEARANCE 

Backpacks
Mens Apparel
Womens Apparel
Climbing
Footwear
Accessories

 BRANDS 

Black Diamond
Granite Gear
La Sportiva
Osprey
Smartwool

 WAYS TO SHOP 

Sale
Clearance
Top Brands
All Brands

 Backpacking Equipment 

Shelters
BackPacks
Sleeping Bags
Water Treatment
Kitchen
Hydration
Climbing


 Backcountry Gear Clearance


Stay Healthy--Eat Well

MARY JANES FARM ORGANIC MEALS

Mary Janes Farm Organic Backcountry Meals

NATURAL HIGH GOURMET MEALS

Natural High

 

Page 2 of 2 < 1 2
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#139183 - 09/22/10 09:43 PM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: finallyME]
JAK Offline
member

Registered: 03/19/04
Posts: 2569
I agree with what was just said about efficiency being less important when the wood is free. Efficiency is still important though, because the good stuff might be scarce, and its good to carry enough for the next fire, and efficiency can mean less work saving energy, and efficiency means less smoke, and efficiency oftem means being able to use damp fuel, though not always.

Still, I think a simple can type hobo, properly sized and holed for conditions (somewhat larger for winter) is very competive and often superior to a manufactured stove like the bush buddy. Also, adjustable windscreen type stoves/fires are usually worthwhile improvements over 3rock type stoves, and can be just as compact. In some places you can use more rocks, or a dakota pit, or a Finnish log candle type stove so even a windscreen isn't always a neccessary improvement.

Three things for certain:
1. Global Sustainability often trumps Leave No Trace.
2. Easy to over-generalize with fire and stoves.
3. Messing with fire and stoves never gets old.

Top
#139208 - 09/23/10 10:58 AM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: JAK]
chimpac Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 148
Loc: alberta,can.
Quote:

We hear stories about smoldering underground fires in the news all the time. I like the idea of the contained wood fire, and especially in something like the Bushbuddy that has double-wall construction. I don't think anyone who uses this forum has ever used one for backpacking, because I've asked for reviews and haven't gotten a single one. In fact, there's been lots of resistance to the idea of using the Bushbuddy or other home-made wood stoves.


And you've hit the nail on the head - this is a lightweight backpacking forum.I *DO* use a wood fire in *some* places i go where it is appropriate to do so, when I do though, and I'm carrying an alky stove or canister stove for the other times.
end quote

I backpack all the time with a woodstove and chimney. What is the weight limit for the chimney/stove to be discussed on the lightweight backpacking forum.

Top
#139221 - 09/23/10 01:11 PM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: chimpac]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
chimpac, I think that a wood stove with a chimney in winter is a completely different animal all together, and my answer changes when talking about this. Also, phat uses a wood stove and chimney in winter. I want to use a wood stove with a chimney, but have yet to make one. I know so little about it, and your pictures are really hard to decipher.

As far as a weight limit, I don't think there is one. If you are going to an area where you would bring a wood stove, then obviously lighter is better. But, if you are going to an area where you can't have a fire because of regulation, then no matter how light a wood stove is, you can't bring it anyways.
_________________________
I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.

Top
#139268 - 09/24/10 03:30 AM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: finallyME]
chimpac Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 148
Loc: alberta,can.
The stove/chimney I used this summer is all steel and weighs 26 ounces. The weight could be reduced using aluminum and titanium parts. I do not have to worry about how much fuel to carry.
I did some berry picking and filled and sealed the jars on site with a steam canner I made for one jar on my woodstove. When its raining is time to pick over the berrys and cook them inside.
I burn very little wood on a gassifier type stove.I leave no fire scars on the forest floor.

If woodstoves are permitted in a campground or not should not be the issue here just the merits of the function of the stove.

The woodstove phat uses is not good for cooking so he only uses it in winter when he needs the heat.


Edited by chimpac (09/24/10 08:56 AM)

Top
#139294 - 09/24/10 06:43 PM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: chimpac]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6401
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
No matter how good the stove is, it can't be used r where or when either it is illegal, gathering wood fuel for it is illegal or above timberline where no fuel is to be had.

In most of the Cascade range (even this past summer which was cooler and wetter than normal) the use of wood fires--including any kind of wood stove--is banned during the dry season (yes, we do have one!), even in front-country campgrounds with fireplaces, because of the high fire danger.

In addition to the problem of fire scars, many areas near timberline have no dead wood left because so many people have used it up over the years. The Forest and Park Services want what dead wood is left, even twigs, to decay and replenish the extremely thin soils in alpine areas, the main reason wood fires are banned at higher altitudes.

I don't think that someone from eastern North America who has never been in the west and who is used to lots of wood everywhere and frequent rain can visualize conditions out here. You are welcome to come out and find out for yourself!


Edited by OregonMouse (09/24/10 06:44 PM)
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

Top
#139317 - 09/25/10 01:32 AM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: OregonMouse]
chimpac Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 148
Loc: alberta,can.
I am really sorry you can't burn wood where you want to go, so you have to make the best of it and use what you can for cooking.
This thread is really about making a gassifier stove, are you saying forget it, you will never use it because there is no place to burn it?
It is good to be informed about where a woodstove on a chimney in a tent is legal and I would be interested in a thread devoted to the subject.

Top
#139323 - 09/25/10 05:26 AM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: chimpac]
Pat-trick Offline
member

Registered: 06/22/09
Posts: 175
Loc: Portland, OR
Originally Posted By chimpac
I am really sorry you can't burn wood where you want to go, so you have to make the best of it and use what you can for cooking.
This thread is really about making a gassifier stove, are you saying forget it, you will never use it because there is no place to burn it?
It is good to be informed about where a woodstove on a chimney in a tent is legal and I would be interested in a thread devoted to the subject.


Let me squeeze a comment in here. I don't believe the Bushbuddy and other double-walled stoves are gassifiers. The double wall design simply adds a secondary air inlet of warmed-up air, for more efficient burning.

I was playing with my variation of this type stove yesterday, and the wood was wet, but i used birch bark like paper, twigs, and then big chunks of wood. After 5 minutes of smoking, the fire got going and lasted about ten minutes. Almost got 2 cups of water boiling. I think the trick is in selecting wood that will get hot and burn long. I have no idea what kind of wood I was burning yesterday, but it wasn't pine. Another trick is to load BIG chunks in the thing, sort of like we do with a home wood stove. After the first 5 minutes, when the thing was trying to get going, there was NO smoke at all. Next time I'll use bigger diameter chunks on top, to see if I can get a boil out of one load of wood. The diameter I was using yesterday was about an inch, an inch and a quarter, for the big stuff. I load the stove with peeled and crumpled birch bark, and then make a hatchwork pile with teensy twigs on top of the birch, and bigger twigs, up to pencil diameter, in the criss-cross pattern half way up the can, then the chunks on top.

With my stove design, there are separate inlets for combustion air for the fire itself, and for the secondary combustion area at the top. Also, if the bottom fills up with combustion debris, I can remove the cook pot, and using a couple longish twigs, pick the stove up while it's burning and move it over, leaving the ashes behind. The bottom is open. Of course it has to be used on a flat rock. I can also add birch bark below the fire to help it out a little, by stuffing it through the primary inlets with a little twig. That's helpful when adding more fuel to keep a fire going. I removed the primary and secondary air adjustment mechanisms for now, because they were getting hard to operate due to the cans being outside all this time and getting a little rusty. woops. I've got a dozen prototypes outside laying around.

For me, here in the east, the wood stove is fun, mystical, my connection to my neanderthal brothers (not you guys), and it's something I do for me. My wanting to mess with it outweighs my concerns for saving 2 ounces. Also, I am happy to not use fossil fuel whenever I can. I know it's different out west, thanks to all the emails describing the situation there. Bummer for you westerners! The thrill of camping for me has always been defined by "the campfire" and things I could put in one. Somemores, marshmallows, hot dogs, my camping buddy... not to mention all the lies and tall tales told boldly. Just kidding about the buddy. Fire is sort of magical out in the woods.

It's interesting that just this week Hillary Clinton was talking about clean-burning stoves for undeveloped countries. The gassifier is just such a stove. It was designed for that kind of use. It's really complicated, clean-burning, and it does convert wood into gases that are then burned. I think it's also a downdraft type of combustion. I don't know of a true downdraft gassifier that is functional for a backpacker. Does anyone know of one? Do we have an expert who knows about this stuff?

Well, if it's a gassifier, or just an efficient burner, I like the idea of a smoke-free fire. I haven't really learned all the nuances of how to use mine yet, but it's a cool way to burn some time, pun intended. Better than sitting in front of the monitor (the new TV, complete with advertisements on every freakin webpage). I know that the Bushbuddy instructions say to "practice, practice, practice!" To use it well probably involves learning about the different kinds of trees, and the burning characteristics of each kind. Every kind of tree burns differently from all the others, and moisture affects them differently, as well. Also, being green or cured makes a difference. I may NEVER learn how to use this thing completely!

On a different note, I was awarded disability (yay!), but the gov't decided to change the date of onset a couple years, thereby screwing me out of 36 grand. I said screw that and am presenting more evidence. If I have to, I'll appeal to the federal courts. I was hoping to get my backpay this month. It's been six years now since I've worked gainfully.
_________________________
http://pdeboard.com

Top
#139324 - 09/25/10 05:30 AM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: Pat-trick]
Pat-trick Offline
member

Registered: 06/22/09
Posts: 175
Loc: Portland, OR
The bottom is open, but there is a wire mesh a half inch above the open bottom, to hold charcoal and burning wood. Only the ashes drop through the wire screen.
_________________________
http://pdeboard.com

Top
#139325 - 09/25/10 05:35 AM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: Pat-trick]
Pat-trick Offline
member

Registered: 06/22/09
Posts: 175
Loc: Portland, OR
I'll try to get some pictures today.
_________________________
http://pdeboard.com

Top
#139341 - 09/25/10 08:50 PM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: chimpac]
Trailrunner Offline
member

Registered: 01/05/02
Posts: 1835
Loc: Los Angeles
Originally Posted By chimpac
The stove/chimney I used this summer is all steel and weighs 26 ounces.


Just curious, why would you carry a chimney in the summer? I can see just a wood stove, but a chimney adds a lot of weight. Is it really cold where you camp in the summer?
_________________________
If you only travel on sunny days you will never reach your destination.*

* May not apply at certain latitudes in Canada and elsewhere.

Top
#139344 - 09/26/10 12:45 AM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: Trailrunner]
chimpac Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 148
Loc: alberta,can.
It all depends on the weather.
How many days is it comfortable to have breakfast out side on the patio. Canada is cooler than California and this summer we have had alot of stormy weather when nobody is out on the patio. When you carry a chimney you have the option of being inside out of the wind, rain and smoke. I do not need a different rig for the coldest winter weather.

Without a chimney a camp shelter is only a fair weather outfit. You can tell that by how many tenters there are after labor day or before June here in Canada, their equipment is designed only for fair weather. We have days in summer when the temperature does not get above 10 C. Its no fun cooking and eating in a cold wind around a little gas stove and in the rain its impossible.
How much is a "lot of weight"?


Edited by chimpac (09/26/10 09:48 AM)

Top
#139348 - 09/26/10 12:23 PM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: chimpac]
Trailrunner Offline
member

Registered: 01/05/02
Posts: 1835
Loc: Los Angeles
Originally Posted By chimpac
How much is a "lot of weight"?


26 ounces. But it is you who carries it, not me. What works for you is all that really matters. But it is possible to be completely warm and comfortable in the winter without a chimney. That is one luxury I can do without.
_________________________
If you only travel on sunny days you will never reach your destination.*

* May not apply at certain latitudes in Canada and elsewhere.

Top
#139349 - 09/26/10 01:21 PM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: Trailrunner]
chimpac Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 148
Loc: alberta,can.
Originally Posted By Trailrunner
Originally Posted By chimpac
How much is a "lot of weight"?


26 ounces. But it is you who carries it, not me. What works for you is all that really matters. But it is possible to be completely warm and comfortable in the winter without a chimney. That is one luxury I can do without.


Chimney with top carrier, bottom base, coupler weighs 16 ounces out of the total 26. I can make an effort to take that weight down useing aluminum to maybe 10 ounces if the 6 ounces extra is going to make me to tired.

I would like to compare that with what you carry for just cooking no heat. For cooking outside in whatever weather.

What does your stove, windscreen and fuel weigh for a weeks trip?

Top
#139353 - 09/26/10 03:41 PM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: chimpac]
Trailrunner Offline
member

Registered: 01/05/02
Posts: 1835
Loc: Los Angeles
Originally Posted By chimpac
I would like to compare that with what you carry for just cooking no heat. For cooking outside in whatever weather.

What does your stove, windscreen and fuel weigh for a weeks trip?


Sorry, I'm not competing against you. Your needs are not mine. Carry whatever you wish. I don't cook outside in bad weather and I don't need the extra weight of a chimney to cook inside. Your system would never work for me.
_________________________
If you only travel on sunny days you will never reach your destination.*

* May not apply at certain latitudes in Canada and elsewhere.

Top
#139356 - 09/26/10 07:11 PM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: Trailrunner]
CamperMom Offline
member

Registered: 01/04/02
Posts: 1186
Loc: Eastern MA, USA
Jumping in---

None of use should be competing when anyone is seeking information. Shouldn't this be about "HYOH?" Summer was brutally hot in a lot of the eastern USA, especially North Carolina through Virginia, where I was over the summer. A week's worth of fuel for me in the summer might be 3.5 to 6 Esbit tablets, assuming I am backpacking and trying to crank out miles. I have lots of toys, but keep going back to a Vienna sausage can for a pot. My cookset: pot, lid, spoon, insulated Ziplock Bowl, titanium wing stove is probably 3 ounces. That may be fine for me with easy resupplies of precooked-prepackaged meals that only neeed water to reconstitute. If I had to buy food in towns and cook it, things would have to be different. If the weather were cold/wet, my plan might have to change. As it is, in summer, I might totally skip coffee for caffeinated gum, coffee beans (maybe in chocolate), or a cold mountain latte made with instant coffee and dry milk. We all have to do what works for us.

CamperMom

Top
#139366 - 09/26/10 11:26 PM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: CamperMom]
oldranger Offline
member

Registered: 02/23/07
Posts: 1735
Loc: California (southern)
Another consideration is fire safety. In the American Southwest (including California) fire restrictions are frequently in effect. Often the last type of stove allowed would be a canister system. I have seen conditions where I would not even light one of those, going instead for cold meals. At that point, in my opinion, it is best to not be in the woods at all.

On the first days of autumn, it has finally warmed up here in SoCal, and Santa Ana winds are in the forecast.

HYOH and peace.

Top
#139369 - 09/27/10 04:13 AM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: Pat-trick]
chimpac Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 148
Loc: alberta,can.
Here is what I have learned about a makng a stove burn as a gassifier.
It has to have two zones,
one zone where the wood is cooked to slowly release the gas.
The other a very hot zone where the gas (smoke) burns.
This can be done if the wood is stacked vertical and burned from the top down. The top supplied with good draft directed at the flame. The bottom deprived of oxygen, only getting enough to cook the gas out of the wood.
The smoke from the bottom will put the fire out on the top if the fire on the top is not hot enough. Small stuff has to be added until it burns hot enough. You should always see flames on the top. My stove is closed on top, draft comes in at flame level. The smoke exits out the back. There is a draft opening at the bottom that is closed or almost closed. I have not experimented much with a stove with an open top.


Edited by chimpac (09/27/10 04:28 AM)

Top
#139370 - 09/27/10 06:29 AM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: chimpac]
JAK Offline
member

Registered: 03/19/04
Posts: 2569
I also like the idea of a close topped hobo stove. I've seen some old hobo designs like that. Not as sofisticated as yours, just hole near bottom and hole near top, but with the can upside down as opposed to what is usually done. Upside is you get a hotter combustion temperature. Downside is you can have some trouble getting the heat to your pot. Also, you still need some sort of insulation from the ground, especially wet ground or snow, and some sort of a grate helps also, but I question the need for a grate really, if gasification or partial gasification is what you are after anyhow.

The other thing I wonder about is the best design if you want to use the stove both for cooking and for throwing some heat. The open top type isn't bad if you are sitting over it, but I think the closed top and open side is probably better.

With a simple coffee can type stove you could always use it right side up or upside down I suppose. The best base in both cases might be another can. Perhaps a tuna can. Or perhaps it could be your can for holding tinder and burning char. Normally you would make char with the can over the fire, but if it was under, that might work and provide insulation and volatile gases at the same time, through a pinhole. Still some more insulation under that setup would still be helpful. It starts to get overcomplicated again.

This is beginning to appeal to me again...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEHSJftQ9Vg&feature=related

OK, so carrying a chainsaw is sketchy. Even with a handsaw, getting 6" logs isn't practical. But what about driving one green stick into the ground like a stake, and then bundling 6 sticks around it with some snare wire or some sort of band clamp. Or perhaps a thin sheet around them to serve also as a wind screen. Maybe 3 stakes would be better, or the wind screen metal would serve as the legs or reinforce the legs. Anyhow, the ide would be to tightly bundle roughly 7 2" diameter sticks together, with the center stick being only 2" tall, and the others at least 6" taller, except one maybe where the chimney hole goes out. Some sort of tuna can for a stove top.

Top
#139706 - 10/01/10 11:58 AM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: chimpac]
chimpac Offline
member

Registered: 04/06/09
Posts: 148
Loc: alberta,can.
I have discovered that I can get a gasifier burn with a horizontal firebox if there is a baffle or part of a baffle in the stove to make the smoke go to the front of the stove to get out.
New wood or wet wood is put to the back of the stove, the hot coals and burning wood is raked to the front next to the front draft.

I prefer a vertical stove because.
A horizontal firebox delivers most radiant heat more up and down.
A vertical firebox delivers more radiant heat sideways.

A horizontal stove laying down in the corner of the tent does not deliver as much radiant heat to the bodies in the tent as a vertical stove standing in the middle of the tent.


Edited by chimpac (10/01/10 12:07 PM)

Top
#139759 - 10/02/10 02:20 PM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: chimpac]
JAK Offline
member

Registered: 03/19/04
Posts: 2569
You got me to thinking about how to make a stove more directional, for a solo hiker/camper. It is true what you say, but only if the outside surfaces are the same temperature. The top is usually even hotter, which reinforces your point.

So what if the stove was better insulated all around, even on top when you don't have a pot on it, and then you opened the door to allow heat to radiate out directly in that drection only. With more insulation on the other sides you would still maintain a high combustion temperature. If the stovepipe was small enough in diameter and not to tall in height you would not get too much airflow, and your stovepipe would be lighter in weight. You would probably still want a baffle.

So how much heat can you radiate from a 4"x4" opening?

Heat Tranfer Rate, q = 5.6703 10-8 (W/m2K4) x A x (Ts^4 - Ta^4)
(Area, A in m2; Temperature, T in degK)

Area, A = 4"x4" = ~ 0.01 m^2
Ta = Ambient Temperature of say 300K
(80F surface temperature of person sitting in front)

Ts = Stove Temperature of 260F to 800F depending.
400K = 260F: 10 watts = 9 kcal/hr
500K = 440F: 31 watts = 27 kcal/hr
600K = 620F: 69 watts = 59 kcal/hr
700K = 800F: 132 watts = 113 kcal/hr
800K = 980F: 228 watts = 196 kcal/hr

For every ounce of wood burned (roughly 1"x1"x4") at 20% moisture you will get about 400 BTU = ~ 100 kcal, so if you can achieve 10% efficiency in terms of direct radiant heat, if that is your aim, it would require 10 ounces of wood per hour to transfer 100 kcal/hr, or 30 ounces per hour to transfer 300 kcal/hr. Of course there will be other useful heat by thermal radiation and convection to the space and other surfaces, such as you sleeping bag, hanging clothes, cook pots, fuel supply, that sort of thing. It shouldn't take much heat for a small space, but with a wood stove you can't really run it all night like a candle or oil lamp, so its nice to be a little larger to get a really good drying out heat in a short span of time. Still, doesn't take much of a stove to do that for a small space. It would be interesting to go even smaller, also with a smaller diameter stovepipe. Say a 4"x4"x8" firebox or even smaller. Perhaps a vertical batch load, so maybe 4"x4"x4" of fuel, and 4"x4"x4" of space above that, but designed and packed in such a way to burn down uniformly and slowly.

Top
#139761 - 10/02/10 02:37 PM Re: Making my own wood gassifier stove [Re: JAK]
JAK Offline
member

Registered: 03/19/04
Posts: 2569
p.s. But if like stay horizontal, with the 4"x4"x4" jammed to the back of the stove, with the 4"x4"x4" combustion space in front of that, with a baffle above so that air flow in through the open door and combustion gasses pass forward under the baffle and then up and over the baffle and back across the top of the baffle and under your cooking surface when not covered, and then up the stovepipe. In such a conventional configuration, even though it is horizontal, it should radiate most heat out through the door while it is open, because you can see the wall of flame as it burns through the batch of wood. Also, as ash builds up it can fall and be scraped away.

So maybe horizontal is better.

p.p.s I like your design with the stove simply cantilevered off the stovepipe. The stove should be light enough for this, even when loaded and with a pot on top. Not sure of best diameter and height for a stovepipe, when minimizing weight. I like the idea of switching to aluminum tubing after a certain distance from the combustion zone. Perhaps the entire stovepipe could be a single aluminum tube, doubling as the tentpole, and hiking staff. As long as the baffling and insulating was done right, and the stove was loaded and operated right, I can't see that being a problem. You could then go with a diameter that is just comfortable as a hiking pole without being too big, like 1-1/4" maybe, or 1" if you could make the stove small enough.

Top
Page 2 of 2 < 1 2

Shout Box

Highest Quality Lightweight Down Sleeping Bags
 
Western Mountaineering Sleeping Bags
 
Lite Gear Talk - Featured Topics
Butane Stove
by Jim M
12/15/17 08:05 PM
Knife, Fire Starter, Ignition Source
by Jim M
12/11/17 07:34 PM
Bivvy bag with wired peak
by Petro1234
12/10/17 01:06 PM
Backcountry Discussion - Featured Topics
Greetings - and a question
by valongi
12/11/17 11:35 AM
Just found out about UCO candles
by toddfw2003
11/30/17 08:41 AM
Hitting the eagle rock loop, Ark in 3 days
by toddfw2003
11/19/17 11:31 AM
Make Your Own Gear - Featured Topics
Plant based insulation...
by billstephenson
11/18/17 02:58 PM
lightest grommets to use
by toddfw2003
10/22/17 06:13 PM
avalibility of thin ti rod
by the-gr8t-waldo
01/26/17 04:45 PM
Featured Photos
Breakneck Ridge, New York
May 2012 Eclipse, Lassen Park
New Years Eve 2011
Trip Report with Photos
Seven Devils, Idaho
Oat Hill Mine Trail 2012
Dark Canyon - Utah
Who's Online
0 registered (), 24 Guests and 0 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
BrianV, runningman55, ponchoman, valongi, Atkinson J
12472 Registered Users
Forum Links
Disclaimer
Policies
Site Links
HOME
Backpacking.net
Family Hiking
Lightweight Gear Store
Backpacking Book Store
Lightweight Zone
Hiking Essentials

Outdoor Gear Daily Deals
Outlets, Sales, Bargains

Our long-time Sponsor, BackcountryGear.com - The leading source for ultralite/lightweight outdoor gear:

Backcountry Forum
 
 

Since 1996 - the Original Backcountry Forum
Copyright © The Lightweight Backpacker & BackcountryForum.com