Amazon.com
Backpacking Forums
BackcountryGear.com
backcountry gear

---- Our Gear Store ----
The Lightweight Gear Store
 
 WINTER CAMPING 

Shelters
Bivy Bags
Sleeping Bags
Sleeping Pads
Snow Sports
Winter Kitchen

 SNOWSPORTS 

Snowshoes
Avalanche Gear
Skins
Hats, Gloves, & Gaiters
Accessories

 ULTRA-LIGHT 

Ultralight Backpacks
Ultralight Bivy Sacks
Ultralight Shelters
Ultralight Tarps
Ultralight Tents
Ultralight Raingear
Ultralight Stoves & Cookware
Ultralight Down Sleeping Bags
Ultralight Synthetic Sleep Bags
Ultralight Apparel


the Titanium Page
WM Extremelite Sleeping Bags

 CAMPING & HIKING 

Backpacks
Tents
Sleeping Bags
Hydration
Kitchen
Accessories

 CLIMBING 

Ropes & Cordage
Protection & Hardware
Carabiners & Quickdraws
Climbing Packs & Bags
Big Wall
Rescue & Industrial

 MEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 WOMEN'S APPAREL 

Jackets
Shirts
Baselayer
Headwear
Gloves
Accessories

 FOOTWEAR 

Men's Footwear
Women's Footwear

 CLEARANCE 

Backpacks
Mens Apparel
Womens Apparel
Climbing
Footwear
Accessories

 BRANDS 

Black Diamond
Granite Gear
La Sportiva
Osprey
Smartwool

 WAYS TO SHOP 

Sale
Clearance
Top Brands
All Brands

 Backpacking Equipment 

Shelters
BackPacks
Sleeping Bags
Water Treatment
Kitchen
Hydration
Climbing


 Backcountry Gear Clearance


Stay Healthy--Eat Well

MARY JANES FARM ORGANIC MEALS

Mary Janes Farm Organic Backcountry Meals

NATURAL HIGH GOURMET MEALS

Natural High

 

Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#122157 - 10/11/09 11:08 AM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: ]
Fiddleback Offline
member

Registered: 06/22/04
Posts: 478
Loc: Northern Rockies
What you may have discovered for yourself is the idea of wrapping food in foil, not the idea of cooking food in a hole in the ground.

This from wikipedia: "En Papillote (French: "in parchment") is a method of cooking in which the food is put into a folded pouch or parcel and then baked. The parcel is typically made from folded parchment paper, but other material such as a paper bag or aluminium foil may be used. The parcel holds in moisture to steam the food. The moisture may be from the food itself or from an added moisture source like water, wine, or stock. En Papillote is perhaps most often used to cook fish and also poultry. Choice of herbs, seasonings and spices depend on the particular recipe being prepared."

It can be a very convenient, if not light, way to do camp cooking. I've done whole sweet potato/yams, a 'crustless' apple pie, store-bought biscuits, etc. by wrapping them and dropping them on/beside the coals. Much of the food was prepared and prewrapped at home. And while coals were necessary, a hole in the ground was not.

Do a Google search. The last time I did I found dozens and dozens of recipes for foil wrapped food including a collectors' item book, Manifold Destiny which provides instruction for putting the foil pack on your engine block to find a hot meal at the end of your drive. grin

FB



Edited by Fiddleback (10/11/09 12:43 PM)
_________________________
"...inalienable rights...include the right to a clean and healthful environment..." Montana Constitution

Top
#122158 - 10/11/09 11:44 AM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: ]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
We had hobo veggies last trip out - some taters, onions, carrots, and spices wrapped in foil, dropped in the coals. I usually take foil, garlic salt and butter or olive oil on backpack trips in case I catch some trout. NOM.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

Top
#122168 - 10/11/09 03:32 PM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: lori]
Rick Offline
member

Registered: 05/10/04
Posts: 708
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Yes, foil dinners. Try some sweet potatoe with garlic cloves. Green peppers, onion, and the list goes on. awesome

Top
#122183 - 10/11/09 11:05 PM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: ]
Jimshaw Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/03
Posts: 3938
Loc: Bend, Oregon
you can also heat up a rock, dig a hole in the ground and line it with a piece of fresh moosehide flesh side in. fill it with water and wild onions or whatever and drop in the rock. Fold the skin over it and in a while you'll have some great moose soup.
Jim YMMV crazy

P.S. Singing the moose song while eating moose soup earns extra points...
_________________________
These are my own opinions based on wisdom earned through many wrong decisions. Your mileage may vary.

Top
#122212 - 10/12/09 11:48 AM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: ]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
_________________________
I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.

Top
#122227 - 10/12/09 02:16 PM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: finallyME]
kevonionia Offline
member

Registered: 04/17/06
Posts: 1322
Loc: Dallas, TX
finallyME:

That was your 1000th post, BTW, I think. Congrats! goodjob

Another version of that foil-cooking thing was very popular in the Bahamas when we were cruisin' the sailboat there. And that was cooking red snapper whole (& gutted) with tomatoes, onions, garlic and other spices in the foil on a grill.

It is REAL tasty and moist.

Industrious locals and sailors did a beach campfire and put the foiled red snapper in coals in a hole dug in the sand. I didn't because LNT is much more important there. When you get a really high tide all that charcoal mess can really spoil a white sand beach, no matter how deep it was buried and how deserted the island.

(If you froze the fish and stuck it in your pack, it might make a great meal the first night on the trail -- you'd would need to pack out the bones for LNT, since no red snapper in the mountains, at least for the last 1/2 million years or so.)
_________________________
- kevon

(avatar: raptor, Lake Dillon)


Top
#122230 - 10/12/09 03:27 PM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: ]
sarbar Offline
member

Registered: 07/15/05
Posts: 1453
Loc: WA
Foil cooking is great and easy to do - but I wouldn't recommend digging a hole in the ground, even in established rings. Why? There can be roots below and if these catch on fire you can start a fire in a tree - even fire away. Those fires can smolder for days before taking off.

But you do foil cooking where you have a layer of coals, the wrapped food, then more hot coals smile
_________________________
Freezer Bag Cooking, Trail Cooking, Recipes, Gear and Beyond:
www.trailcooking.com

Top
#122298 - 10/13/09 02:30 AM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: sarbar]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6399
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
I agree with Sarbar--not generally a good idea.

I've had to put out a several fires that have burned tree roots--sometimes for a considerable distance underground. No, I've never been a fire-fighter; it's just a situation I've encountered several times during my many years of outdoor experience. There are always a few idiots who think it's OK to build a fire under a tree, on top of duff and roots. In all these cases extinguishing the smoldering mess involved a lot of digging to get beyond the burned area both horizontally and vertically, and the hauling of a lot of water.

If you can find an area that is all gravel with no organic matter or nearby trees, and not where the land managers insist on Leave No Trace, then it's probably OK.
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

Top
#123217 - 10/31/09 09:34 PM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: ]
Wolfeye Offline
member

Registered: 01/11/07
Posts: 413
Loc: Seattle, WA
My tribe used to have a great way of cooking freshly caught salmon. You basically make a big wood stake (maybe a yard long) that's split on the non-sharpened end & shove your fillet in the split. You shove smaller sticks in the split, too, at a right angle to the stake; these hold the fish open. Then you tie off the top of the split as tight as you can to hold it shut. You let your campfire burn down to coals, stick the stake in the dirt so it leans over the fire, and let it cook. You can add a water-soaked aromatic hunk of wood to the fire to add some smokey flavor, too. Alder works well.

For some reason not many people cook like this any more.

Top
#123227 - 11/01/09 01:43 AM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: Wolfeye]
OregonMouse Offline
member

Registered: 02/03/06
Posts: 6399
Loc: Gateway to Columbia Gorge
Wolfeye, that sounds really yummy!
_________________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view--E. Abbey

Top
#123232 - 11/01/09 04:42 AM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: OregonMouse]
frenchie Offline
member

Registered: 10/05/05
Posts: 461
Loc: Lyon, France
I guess this is similar to traditonal methods of cooking in other Pacific Ocean islands, but New Caledonian "bougna" is one of the best local food I have ever eaten!
Hole in the ground + banana leaves wrapping + hot rocks...

Top
#123262 - 11/01/09 09:41 PM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: Wolfeye]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
Wolfeye, do you mean like this?..

Ray Mears
_________________________
I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.

Top
#123872 - 11/15/09 06:26 PM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: finallyME]
Wolfeye Offline
member

Registered: 01/11/07
Posts: 413
Loc: Seattle, WA
Exactly like that, finallyME. He must have learned that fillet technique from a different tribe, though; we used ulu-like knives made of slate or muscle shell.

Top
#124497 - 11/28/09 03:55 PM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: ]
sabre11004 Offline
member

Registered: 05/05/07
Posts: 513
Loc: Tennessee
If it is any relevance to the quality of the food that is cooked in the ground, I can remember when I was much younger and we used to go to the beach and spend a couple of nights (when you could actually do that) and we used to get all kinds of sea food (lobster,fish, crabs, and shrimp and cook them that way. It always came out great. Never over cooked, never under cooked and the taste was always the best. I think you may be on to something...sabre11004... goodjob goodjob goodjob
_________________________
The first step that you take will be one of those that get you there 1!!!!!

Top
#125191 - 12/14/09 01:31 PM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: Wolfeye]
chaz Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/07
Posts: 1149
Loc: Tennessee
It would sure be cool to camp and cook the way the native americans did. They had to use what was on hand. Sticks etc. No foil.
_________________________
Enjoy your next trip...

Top
#125193 - 12/14/09 02:08 PM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: finallyME]
chaz Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/07
Posts: 1149
Loc: Tennessee
FM. Thanks for the link. If I can't go, I can dream.
_________________________
Enjoy your next trip...

Top
#129318 - 02/22/10 02:07 PM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: chaz]
Bobc Offline
member

Registered: 11/07/09
Posts: 26
Loc: SC
One I am not a tree hugger, but the days of digging holes,creating new fire rings and soon fires on public lands are just about over. Yes it nice, nice and messy. If you are on private land then do what you like.

Top
#129358 - 02/23/10 04:06 AM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: Bobc]
Damian Offline
member

Registered: 10/15/02
Posts: 324
+1 about not digging holes.

You also don't need foil - the way it was traditionally done in Australia was to wrap the fish in mud and drop it on coals - the outer would harden and the inside would be very moist.

Top
#129361 - 02/23/10 07:04 AM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: Damian]
CamperMom Offline
member

Registered: 01/04/02
Posts: 1186
Loc: Eastern MA, USA
This was not uncommon among many native peoples, including some Native Americans. I saw some kids doing this when I was a child, as well. They seemed to think that the fish scales would stick to the mud as they opened up the dried coating.

There was a cooking fad several years ago involving a porous clay casserole-type set up. One soaked the clay vessel, top and bottom, in water, added food, then baked the whole thing in an oven. Like the mud, the soaked clay released water to steam the food as the vessel dried again.

CM

Top
#130948 - 03/19/10 12:36 AM Re: digging a hole in the ground to cook food [Re: Damian]
Ecrow Offline
member

Registered: 02/02/08
Posts: 85
Loc: N. New Mexico
Game birds cooked in clay are the best because they are really moist and the feathers peel right off in the baked clay.
_________________________
Ecrow
Live to tell.

Top

Shout Box

Highest Quality Lightweight Down Sleeping Bags
 
Western Mountaineering Sleeping Bags
 
Lite Gear Talk - Featured Topics
Bivvy bag with wired peak
by Petro1234
Today at 01:06 PM
How cheap can you go?
by EMT Dave
12/05/17 07:07 PM
compass, thermometer, baro/altimeter
by edfardos
11/19/17 09:54 PM
Backcountry Discussion - Featured Topics
Just found out about UCO candles
by toddfw2003
11/30/17 08:41 AM
Hitting the eagle rock loop, Ark in 3 days
by toddfw2003
11/19/17 11:31 AM
Flamable fabrics?
by
11/13/17 09:31 PM
Make Your Own Gear - Featured Topics
Plant based insulation...
by billstephenson
11/18/17 02:58 PM
lightest grommets to use
by toddfw2003
10/22/17 06:13 PM
avalibility of thin ti rod
by the-gr8t-waldo
01/26/17 04:45 PM
Featured Photos
Breakneck Ridge, New York
May 2012 Eclipse, Lassen Park
New Years Eve 2011
Trip Report with Photos
Seven Devils, Idaho
Oat Hill Mine Trail 2012
Dark Canyon - Utah
Who's Online
1 registered (), 25 Guests and 0 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
Woodland, ultralight, Wilderbabe, 1321132, guoguo
12466 Registered Users
Forum Links
Disclaimer
Policies
Site Links
HOME
Backpacking.net
Family Hiking
Lightweight Gear Store
Backpacking Book Store
Lightweight Zone
Hiking Essentials

Outdoor Gear Daily Deals
Outlets, Sales, Bargains

Our long-time Sponsor, BackcountryGear.com - The leading source for ultralite/lightweight outdoor gear:

Backcountry Forum
 
 

Since 1996 - the Original Backcountry Forum
Copyright © The Lightweight Backpacker & BackcountryForum.com