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#111785 - 02/23/09 11:23 AM Fire proof coozies
GDeadphans Offline
member

Registered: 12/26/08
Posts: 382
Loc: Maine/New Jersey
I recently made a Super Cat alcohol stove, and was wanting to make a fire proof coozie for my Snow Peak Trek 700 pot...

In having the coozie it will boost the efficiency of the stove, and when done cooking keep the food hot longer.

Any suggestions on material?




_________________________
"To me, hammocking is relaxing, laying, swaying. A steady slow morphine drip without the risk of renal failure." - Dale Gribbel

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#111791 - 02/23/09 12:12 PM Re: Fire proof coozies [Re: GDeadphans]
energy_turtle Offline


Registered: 11/21/08
Posts: 64
Loc: Atlanta, GA
you could try Nomex, but I'd read up on how long it can withstand direct flame before proceeding. I think what you're asking of it is probably too much, though.

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#111792 - 02/23/09 12:31 PM Re: Fire proof coozies [Re: GDeadphans]
finallyME Offline
member

Registered: 09/24/07
Posts: 2710
Loc: Utah
Maybe fiberglass. Never tried it myself.
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#111794 - 02/23/09 01:16 PM Re: Fire proof coozies [Re: finallyME]
chaz Offline
member

Registered: 10/22/07
Posts: 1149
Loc: Tennessee
Look in the big box hardware stores for a material that is coated with aluminum foil and use aluminum tape to put it together. You may find something that uses fiberglass and the aluminum etc. I think the purpose of a coozie is to keep things warm after you heat the water and mix ingredience. To insulate your cook pot, I have coated the bottom with high heat header paint and the sides of the pot with high heat silicon gasket maker. Very ugly but does the job. A lid is very important also.
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#111802 - 02/23/09 03:39 PM Re: Fire proof coozies [Re: GDeadphans]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
What's a coozie? smirk I have a cozy with a mylar lining that I use for freezer bag cooking, and anti gravity gear makes pot sets with Reflectix cozies. You can buy or make them easy enough for whatever size ziploc or pot you want to use - a roll of Reflectix and some duct tape goes a looooong way.
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#111825 - 02/23/09 09:39 PM Re: Fire proof coozies [Re: GDeadphans]
Heber Offline
member

Registered: 12/31/07
Posts: 245
Loc: St. Louis, Missouri
I don't think a cozy permanently attached to the pot is the best idea. While the stove is running it will slow down the heating of the water. That warm air that rises up the sides of the pot makes the net flow of heat INTO the pot, not the reverse. Once the stove is out you can slip a cozy on to retain the heat.

That's my recommendation anyway.

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#111838 - 02/24/09 12:23 AM Re: Fire proof coozies [Re: Heber]
lori Offline
member

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 2801
Originally Posted By Heber
I don't think a cozy permanently attached to the pot is the best idea. While the stove is running it will slow down the heating of the water. That warm air that rises up the sides of the pot makes the net flow of heat INTO the pot, not the reverse. Once the stove is out you can slip a cozy on to retain the heat.

That's my recommendation anyway.


I guess I didn't read that into the original post - I supposed the concern was not having something flammable in the vicinity of the stove, not cooking in it. I would never use a cozy on a pot while it's in use - reflectix is the most oft used material for cozies and it would surely melt over direct flame, but it isn't likely to catch on fire.
_________________________
"In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities. In the expert's mind there are few." Shunryu Suzuki

http://hikeandbackpack.com

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#111855 - 02/24/09 11:22 AM Re: Fire proof coozies [Re: lori]
GDeadphans Offline
member

Registered: 12/26/08
Posts: 382
Loc: Maine/New Jersey
I originally wanted a cozy (thanks for the spelling correction, coozie felt wrong lol) to cover the pot after cooking, but was thinking if the cozy was on the sides of the pot would it help or hinder the cook time. Just something wrapped around so the direct cold air is not hitting the sides of the pot. But, I do see the other way to this...its more the heat has to travel through on the bottom....



_________________________
"To me, hammocking is relaxing, laying, swaying. A steady slow morphine drip without the risk of renal failure." - Dale Gribbel

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#111863 - 02/24/09 12:03 PM Re: Fire proof coozies [Re: GDeadphans]
Paddy_Crow Offline
member

Registered: 11/08/04
Posts: 2285
Loc: Michigan
Cold air is not hitting the sides of the pot. Heated air from the stove deflects off the bottom of the pot and continues up the sides. Adding insulation to the sides will likely reduce the amount of heat transferred into the pot (in most circumstances).

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#111875 - 02/24/09 01:56 PM Re: Fire proof coozies [Re: Paddy_Crow]
EricKingston Offline
member

Registered: 11/01/02
Posts: 272
Loc: Michigan
I was thinking the same thing...

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