Considering the move to trail-runners.....

Posted by: Fasttimes

Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/01/12 12:16 PM

Hello all, it's been years since I've been to this site and out backpacking. My last hike was in '07, so it's been a while. I'm now gearing up to take the gf on her first backcountry hike and as I help her get her gear it's got me itching to switch out some of my older heavier stuff.

I'm debating on switching over to some trail-runners from my trusted old-heavier Vasque Sundowners. But I have a few questions. I'm sure it's up to each individual, but around what weight are we talking about on your back that it seems like you'll be ok with some trail sneakers? When shopping for trail-runners do you just forgoe the GTX option since they are so low cut? Any specific models and brands to look at? Thanks!!
Posted by: lori

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/01/12 12:40 PM

I use trail runners for loads up to 40 lbs. You couldn't't pay me to use GTX.
Good trail runners have enough support in the sole to protect the feet. When needed I use shortie or full gaiters.
Posted by: hikerduane

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/01/12 01:15 PM

I switched to trail runners about eight years ago, on my second pair of Montrail Hardrock's (discontinued) currently. I've been around a 30 lb. pack the last 8-9 years, doing some off trail on bp trips also in the Sierra, SEKI. No foot issues or sprains etc. My pack has sustained more damage from being drug over rocks than I have.
Duane
Posted by: Glenn

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/01/12 02:13 PM

I switched to trail shoes at about 25 pounds; now I rarely hike with more than 20 pound loads. I wouldn't switch back below 30.

I do like the GTX option - much of the time, it seems I'm on muddy trails, with perhaps one or two inch deep standing water. The GTX option keeps my feet drier, since I tend not to detour around such obstacles. It doesn't keep my feet appreciably drier in the rain, since water runs down into the shoes from my legs (no different than it did with ankle-high boots.)If I were sure I'd always be in drier areas, I'd forego GTX.

I've always been a Vasque partisan - Sundowners were my boot until I switched to the Breeze shoes; naturally, they no longer make the Breeze shoes. I tried on a couple of the models that allegedly replaced it in their line, but found the heel too loose. I just bought a pair of Patagonia drifters (GTX), which have felt fine on a couple of 3-mile dayhikes with a 5 pound load. Haven't worn them on an actual backpack trip yet, but they are comfortable.

However, don't be misled by what I like. The ONLY criteria for boots is how they feel on your feet. They must fit YOU, not me.
Posted by: OregonMouse

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/01/12 02:48 PM

I switched three years ago. I had been a holdout for years, but I had become disenchanted with Goretex (like having my feet in a sauna, and it took 3 days for the boots to dry after water got inside). It's almost impossible to find women's hiking boots that do not have Goretex liners, and what I found didn't fit.

I tried Montrail Hardrocks and never looked back. In fact, I have never worn the boots since and they are going to Goodwill. I bought several pair of the Hardrocks, which was a good thing because Columbia Sportswear first bought them out and kept making the last poorer and then discontinued the Hardrocks altogether. I still have a pair that I recently started wearing and have one more brand new pair before I have to start looking all over again. (Moral--once you find the perfect shoe, buy several pair before the manufacturer changes the model.)

I used to have quite a few ankle-turning sessions with the boots (I have severe pronation problems) and was really apprehensive about the trail runners. When I first got them, I tried to turn my ankles on purpose and couldn't do it no matter how hard I tried! Not just IMHO but per the reports of others who know more about this than I do, it's the footbed of the shoe that keeps the foot and ankles stable, not a piece of leather around your ankles.

My son #3 has carried up to 45 lbs. wearing trail runners. In defense of the load, he was sherpa-ing for two young children and also hauling a heavy wet suit and his surfboard to the Olympic NP wilderness coast.

Of course everyone's feet are different, so you'll have to try them for yourself. As long as they fit properly, if you decide they don't work on the trail they will still be good for at-home, casual and exercise wear.

And welcome back to the forum!

Posted by: Fasttimes

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/01/12 02:50 PM

Well, I'm eyeing the Vasque Velocity 2.0 shoes right now. No place in town to try on, so I have to order and hope I don't have to do an exchange. I'm debating between the GTX option. It's about $45 more.

Vasque Velocity 2.0 GTX

Vasque Velocity 2.0 standard
Posted by: OregonMouse

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/01/12 03:01 PM

Order them from one of the online shoe outfits that gives you free return shipping! Put on your loaded pack and take a long hike around the house (so they're still returnable) before you decide to keep them.

Do you have some running shoe stores in your area? That would be a better place to find what you need and get a proper fit.

Unless your feet never sweat, I don't recommend the GTX option. Your shoes will dry much faster (and they will get wet, believe me) without the Goretex. I just splash through fords and walk my shoes dry, although the process can be speeded by wringing out socks afterwards.
Posted by: Fasttimes

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/01/12 03:15 PM

Originally Posted By OregonMouse
Order them from one of the online shoe outfits that gives you free return shipping! Put on your loaded pack and take a long hike around the house (so they're still returnable) before you decide to keep them.

Do you have some running shoe stores in your area? That would be a better place to find what you need and get a proper fit.

Unless your feet never sweat, I don't recommend the GTX option. Your shoes will dry much faster (and they will get wet, believe me) without the Goretex. I just splash through fords and walk my shoes dry, although the process can be speeded by wringing out socks afterwards.




I went ahead and ordered the non-GTX version from Zappos which has free shipping both ways. Hopefully they work out. Thanks for the help!! thanks
Posted by: Rick_D

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/01/12 03:18 PM

Goretex is okay for winter and the shoulder seasons, but I'd skip it in summer for the added ventilation of the standard model--especially if you're hiking in Florida.

Give 'em a try. So long as the fit is good, the support is good and the soles are grippy, hiking in low-tops is usually fine.

Mine never last long (whatever the brand) so over time there's no cost savings, but a good-fitting light pair of shoes well matched to the trail genuinely means less fatigue and more miles.

My "ideal" trail sneakers are light, well-ventilated and ankle-height, because I find they let in less debris, sans gaiters, and keep me from bashing my ankles. Such shoes are very hard to find, however, as most mid-heights tend to also have GT or some other WPB.

Good luck,

Originally Posted By Fasttimes
Well, I'm eyeing the Vasque Velocity 2.0 shoes right now. No place in town to try on, so I have to order and hope I don't have to do an exchange. I'm debating between the GTX option. It's about $45 more.

Vasque Velocity 2.0 GTX

Vasque Velocity 2.0 standard
Posted by: bigsac

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/02/12 12:36 PM

Hi fasttimes. I have an old pair of Vasque Sundowners that are made in Italy. That shows you how far back I go.

I switched to trail runners about 10 years ago and they have worked for me. Oh my friends would see me with my backpack and trail runners and tell me I was going to snap my skinny ankles for sure. I hike mostly, but not always, in the Sierra of Northern California and encounter some pretty rugged, rocky trails. My pack weight is below 25 lb. I haven't snapped those bird legs yet.

I'm partial to Montrail and loved the old discontinued Hardrock. I still have a pair of Hardrock wides, but they have seen better days. I recently bought a pair of Montrail AT Plus's, which have a slightly different feel than the Hardrock's, but seem to work OK. They don't come in wide, but the regular seems to fit my slightly wide foot all right.

I don't like GTX, but will wear it reluctantly in winter or the shoulder seasons. I have a pair of North Face Hedge Hog GTX's that work for me. Some other non GTX shoes that I have liked are the Merrell Moab Ventilators, and the Brooks Cascadia series. The Montrails seem to be a little stiffer with a better rockplate however.

I have size 10 1/2 D width men's feet. I am what they call a supinator or under pronator which is just fancy talk for slightly high arches and wearing out the outside of the heel first. I sometimes use replacement insoles for added arch support. If your feet are not like mine, the above shoes may not work for you. Fit is a personal thing.
Posted by: Dryer

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/03/12 08:42 AM

I switched about 10 years ago, and also have some Vasque Sundowners. This appears to be a "gateway boot". grin I still wear the Sundowners locally if there is snow, or I'm doing trail maintenance, but never hiking anymore. They are great boots. I hike in New Balance (whatever is on sale) and don't really pay much attention if they are called "trail runners". I can't tell much difference between running shoes and 'all terrain' that New Balance puts on the labels. I play disc golf which has me in all kinds of terrain and running shoes work best. When backpacking, I rarely carry as much as 25 lbs. with water and all, and trail runners have 1) increased my mileage 2) drastically reduced blisters and fatigue. Only a few times have I had a thorn punch through but they never made it to my foot. That happens with boots too.

I have had hiking shoe soles come 'un-glued', including my first pair of Vasque Sundowners (the old rounded heal version). Texas heat tends to soften sole glue in the rocks, so I inspect that part of the shoe well before buying/hiking. I also learned to carry light weight sandals in my pack as 'spare tires' which combined with the trail runners still weigh less than boots. I've seen shoe soles laying in the scree, miles from any help and I don't want to end up like that. wink


Posted by: sandia

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/03/12 10:46 AM

Question of "weight on your back," when considering footwear is less relevant than nature of the travel surface.

One can happily backpack in sandals on a well-groomed trail. Kicking steps in snow is best done in sturdy boots.

Other scenarios as applicable.

Posted by: Glenn

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/03/12 07:07 PM

Good point about surfaces and seasons. I think we all assumed "normal" trail conditions in three seasons - off-trail, winter, heavy talus - all could change the answer.

I'm lucky - here in Ohio, even winter (or at least the winter I'll go hiking in) is only a couple of inches of snow, so the GTX trail shoes work for me all year around.
Posted by: oldranger

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/03/12 09:49 PM

Yet another Sundowner here, primarily because it was the official NPS heavy uniform boot when I was working, and I could obtain them essentially free. I actually wore out one pair and made sure I had a couple of pairs stashed away when I retired - but I mostly hike in trail runners or approach shoes these days.
Posted by: skcreidc

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/04/12 08:17 AM

I wear what I feel is necessary for the "task". Sometimes trail runners and other times something else. Fit is number one though, and sometimes it takes some mileage to show that something will work for me. I would love to wear approach shoes for a number of my little adventures, but good luck finding them in a comfortable 14 eeee.

The Zappos option for online purchasing seems to work very well. Just keep track of the returns and let them know ASAP if they short you. They seem good about correcting errors as well.
Posted by: Dryer

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/04/12 12:08 PM

Quote:
Kicking steps in snow is best done in sturdy boots.



Oh, no doubt, conditions dictate everything, not just footwear.

I know what I WON'T be doing again and that's hiking in sandals as primary treads. I tried it for a year, and more than once jammed a stick under/over/into my toes which cut me. The last thing I want in the bush is a ground level, dusty cut on my feet. I decided the added ounces of real shoes and socks was well worth the weight. I want my feet clean, dry, and protected. Live and learn.
Posted by: finallyME

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/04/12 01:48 PM

I use New Balance shoes, whatever is on sale and in my size. I have to have 4Es, and New Balance is one of the few with shoes my width. A couple of weeks ago, I left REI again, empty handed, because they didn't have a shoe that was wide enough. Anyways, last week I spent a good couple hours kick stepping in snow to get to the summit of Ben Lomond. I had on my non-waterproof New Balance's. My feet were soaked 90% of the hike, no blisters.
Posted by: OregonMouse

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/04/12 02:58 PM

Quote:
A couple of weeks ago, I left REI again, empty handed, because they didn't have a shoe that was wide enough.


Try a good running shoe store instead!
Posted by: sandia

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/04/12 03:01 PM

If you hiked in sandals for an entire year, perhaps you avoided (or failed to avoid) varied conditions.

On a number of trips one might spend a day walking in sandals, a couple of days in mountaineering boots, and then back to the sandals for some or all of the walk out.

It may be best to have several types of footwear for various sorts of trips, while scrupulously avoiding dogmatic views of what one supposedly MUST or must NEVER wear.

I generally bring along sandals, and may or may not hike much in them and or bring other footwear.

One of their great and obvious advantages is in fording streams -- and even (for me recently) in using streams as trails.
Posted by: Dryer

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/04/12 05:09 PM

Quote:
If you hiked in sandals for an entire year, perhaps you avoided (or failed to avoid) varied conditions.



Not new at this game, sandia. I run a nature preserve and hike a lot, just to sweep the trails at days end. Hike in sandals enough and something will find it's way in.
I do carry them as 'spare tires' though...cheap insurance.
When I first started the ultralight thing, 15 years ago, I'd read of die-hards that hiked only in sandals, so I gave it a shot. I bet those die-hards don't hike exclusively in them either, anymore. grin
Posted by: OregonMouse

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/04/12 06:12 PM

Quote:
When I first started the ultralight thing, 15 years ago, I'd read of die-hards that hiked only in sandals, so I gave it a shot. I bet those die-hards don't hike exclusively in them either, anymore.


My daughter still hikes in sandals and has been doing so for over 10 years. I think she's nuts! But what does Mom know?
lol
Posted by: Glenn

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/04/12 10:03 PM

Eventually, they admit that Mom knows something (and maybe even Dad did, too.)

Our first granddaughter just turned eleven, and is entering her pre-teens, which means that she is beginning to test the parent-set limits and question their overall intelligence.

Accordingly, at least once a month, the weekly phone call includes a question from our daughter: "Have I remembered to apologize to you for my teen years?" Brings a tear to old Dad's eye, and joy to his heart. ("Grandkids are my best revenge.") smile
Posted by: OregonMouse

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/04/12 11:25 PM

Unfortunately, my daughter is 42 and no kids....
Posted by: Fasttimes

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/06/12 03:42 PM

Received my new trail runners and they seem to be the right size which is a relief. I've worn them for a day so far and seem pretty comfy. Of course I'll have to give them a go with a load on.

Question, with trail runners do you feel the need for a sock liner to prevent blisters?
Posted by: OregonMouse

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/06/12 06:09 PM

I just use a single pair of socks, Smartwool Light Hikers. They are rather cushy, which I like. Some prefer a very thin sock. And of course there is the Wright sock which is a double sock. Your Mileage May Vary. You can always try out various combinations.

One word of warning: You'll find that, especially when you sit down, your ankles are quite vulnerable to mosquitoes. (I found that out the hard way!) You can wear socks with a relatively high cuff and spray the cuffs with permethrin, or you can wear low gaiters. Some low gaiters, like Dirty Girl, are specifically made to keep the trash out of your shoes but not to be waterproof. You can spray those with permethrin and (unless you wash them a lot) it will last a whole mosquito season. I'm still debating the anti-mosquito issue, but since I probably won't be hiking until mosquito season is over, it's probably a moot point for me for this year.

Posted by: Heather-ak

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/06/12 06:59 PM

Another vote for the Smartwool Light Hikers - love them.

However, the hubby swears by the Wright socks.
Posted by: Glenn

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/06/12 07:10 PM

No liners.

The sock is part of the fit of the shoe - the thickness of the sock will let you tweak, just a tiny bit, the volume your foot occupies inside the shoe. I found that Smartwool socks the others mention are excellent; so are some Bridgedale trekking socks. They worked well with the Vasque Breeze shoes I used for a number of years. However, when I got my current pair of Patagonia Drifters, I found that the thicker wool socks made the shoes just a tiny bit too tight. I dug out some old Thorlo hikers I had, which weren't quite as thick, and the fit was perfect. They're also very comfortable for hiking. (Oddly enough, the Thorlos are 100% synthetic - no wool content. They do make a thicker, similarly-constructed Trekker version that does have some wool content.)
Posted by: phat

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/06/12 07:47 PM


Wigwam lite hikers (merino) or smartwool PhD merino's for me.

if I'm with a boot I use a liner. I tend not to in trail runners.

I flit back and forth depending on what I am doing. On "established" trails I wear a trailrunner - ususally some variant of Montrail, which still seem to work for me.

on more off-route stuff - Hanwag boot.

Posted by: Rick_D

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/06/12 09:45 PM

Generally only wear liners when I need to tweak the fit in boots, and never with sneakers.

Am liking Darn Tough Vermont for, well, darn tough and comfy socks.

Cheers,
Posted by: Dryer

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/07/12 12:31 AM

Quote:
Question, with trail runners do you feel the need for a sock liner to prevent blisters?


I buy the thinnest nylon dress socks I can find....usually the cheapest at Walmart. I wear two pair, which are still thinner than one pair of normal thickness socks. No blisters or hotspots. A little sulfur dust will keep the skeeters away from your ankles.
Posted by: lori

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/07/12 12:34 AM

I stopped wearing liners when I found socks and shoes that worked well for my feet. Don't need them. In fact, I tried wearing synthetic liners for a really long day of hiking and found they actually irritate my feet as compared to just the Smartwool PhDs I now wear.
Posted by: BrianLe

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/07/12 10:06 AM

Unless it's cold out, I just wear just (a single pair of) liner socks. Quick drying, and depending on brand surprisingly durable.

Add a pair of wool socks if it's cold enough. Modify the above if blisters seem to be a problem ... injinji's if toe blisters, a light wool/synthetic mixture short oversock otherwise.
Posted by: ndwoods

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/08/12 02:57 AM

I switched about 10 years ago too. I don't wear liners either....just Brooks Arielle running shoes....AND stretchy short gaitors! Hate rocks in my shoes....never hike without my gaitors. smile
Posted by: Dryer

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners...Crocs? - 06/08/12 08:58 AM

And speaking of trail runners, Crocs has vastly broadened their product line with boots, golf shoes, camo sandals, etc.
I can't seem to find these things anywhere to eyeball them, so has anyone anything to say about them? I like the idea of foam shoes...very lightweight...but wondered if they hold up.
I crewed in a sailboat race a few weeks back and everyone in the club was wearing Crocs as water shoes.
Posted by: skcreidc

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners...Crocs? - 06/08/12 10:01 AM

BrianLe is the only person on this forum to mention toe-socks (Injinji's) other than myself. Very functional and not too heavy, they are very good at minimizing hot spots and blisters. Down side for me is that I kill socks and they run about $15 a pair; I usually rip through the heals. I bring at least one pair with me all the time now (I find mixing up the type of socks I wear day to day really keeps my feet feeling good now matter how hard I push).
Posted by: BrianLe

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners...Crocs? - 06/08/12 11:20 AM

Interesting; I too wear injinji's out pretty (too) fast, but for me it's always the ball of the foot that wears out.

Great for toe blisters, but an alternative is a light silicone separator that keeps the offending toes apart. These are available from a variety of places; footsmart.com has a pretty good selection of such foot related stuff, but if I recall correctly you probably want to give a "expect periodic spam here" email address to them, plus expect some occasional snail-mail spam as well if you ever purchase.

As long as I'm rambling, someone mentioned always using gaiters. So many different approaches to backpacking! I rarely wear gaiters as my pants are long enough that little gets into the shoes. With no gaiters I think my feet are just that much cooler and the shoes can dry out faster when wet. And since the shoes are easier to take off and put back on I'm more willing to take them off to air out my feet at even a short break. In general I just like having one less thing to fiddle with.

There's no single "right answer" here, just an interesting collision of differing experiences and conclusions.
Posted by: Blue_Ridge_Ninja

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners...Crocs? - 06/08/12 12:08 PM

Originally Posted By Dryer
And speaking of trail runners, Crocs has vastly broadened their product line with boots, golf shoes, camo sandals, etc.
I can't seem to find these things anywhere to eyeball them, so has anyone anything to say about them? I like the idea of foam shoes...very lightweight...but wondered if they hold up.
I crewed in a sailboat race a few weeks back and everyone in the club was wearing Crocs as water shoes.

I have a pair of the clog type Crocs that I wear around camp. They also pull double duty for yardwork. Going on 3 years and haven't worn out yet. Super comfy!
Posted by: Fasttimes

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/10/12 07:34 AM

Originally Posted By Fasttimes
Received my new trail runners and they seem to be the right size which is a relief. I've worn them for a day so far and seem pretty comfy. Of course I'll have to give them a go with a load on.

Question, with trail runners do you feel the need for a sock liner to prevent blisters?


Turns out I need a "wide" size shoe and these are not going to work. And nobody has Velocity in size 11 wide. I have a month till I'll be hitting the trail so I need to find some alternatives.

What other models out there seem to be the go to trail runners? Which Montrail or NB models?
Posted by: phat

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/10/12 02:35 PM

Since the demise of the Hard Rock model, I have settled on Montrail Mountain Masochist II, they work good for me, I have wide feet, low arches.
Posted by: BradMT

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/10/12 07:29 PM

Personally, I've always doubted the "1-lb on feet, 5-lb's on back" mantra. I tend to believe if something is repeated often enough it becomes true... even if it isn't.

I think low hikers are more specialized than boots... their place in dry summertime hiking. As a general tool, I'll take boots.
Posted by: Glenn

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/10/12 08:45 PM

I agree that conditions are an important determining factor. Since I hike in Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky, and don't go out in heavy snow (say, more than 2 or 3 inches), low hikers are a four-season shoe for me; since I prefer Gore Tex, they're not just dry-weather, either.

Of course, I'm only a major tool, so you outrank me... smile

(Sorry, couldn't resist.)
Posted by: BradMT

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/12/12 07:41 AM

Originally Posted By Glenn


Of course, I'm only a major tool, so you outrank me... smile

(Sorry, couldn't resist.)


Thanks for the chuckle... there are days when I'm pretty sure General Tool fits laugh
Posted by: BradMT

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/12/12 07:43 AM

Originally Posted By Glenn
I agree that conditions are an important determining factor. Since I hike in Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky, and don't go out in heavy snow (say, more than 2 or 3 inches), low hikers are a four-season shoe for me; since I prefer Gore Tex, they're not just dry-weather, either.


Makes sense to me. My wife's girlfriend wears low hikers on all our backpack trips, even in snow. My wife tried low hikers and they didn't work for her... honestly not enough support.

Everyone is so different, and there is no "right" answer.
Posted by: lori

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/12/12 09:22 AM

I wear low hikers in the snow, through streams, over mountains, climbing boulders... I wear 'em everywhere. Sometimes I put on my kayaking socks. Sometimes I don't, and just dry out the wet socks while wearing the dry pair.

When the snow gets up to my knee I'll put on the winter boots. The rest of the year, fuggedaboutit. No go, Joe. I don't kill my ankles for no good reason.

Posted by: BarryP

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/12/12 02:09 PM

ď I bet those die-hards don't hike exclusively in them either, anymore.Ē

Well, uh, I guess Iím still a die hard. I used them heavy duty in the bogs of the Midwest. And now I love them in the Rocky Mountains. And Iím not talking about groomed trails Ė but cross country.

It took me ~2 dozen pair to find the right sandal (including extra length to prevent stubbed toes) and the right sock.

I found the Teva Hurricane 3 and TeraFi 2ís to be pretty good sandals for my feet. And my groups in the Midwest and now in Idaho wear sandals. Sandals have cleared up A LOT of footwear and feet problems. Itís like wearing slippers in Godís house. Thereís an art to it but thatís another long post in itself.

-Barry
-The mountains were made for Tevaís
Posted by: squishware

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/16/12 10:00 PM

Does stuff get caught under your foot? We have a lot of sand and twigs in FL.
Posted by: Glenn

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/17/12 07:09 AM

Rookie question: do you wear socks with the sandals, or bare feet? (I'm toying with giving them a try this summer, since I've begun carrying a pair of Tevas as camp/wading shoes.)
Posted by: Dryer

Re: Considering the move to trail-runners..... - 06/17/12 08:58 AM

Quote:
It took me ~2 dozen pair to find the right sandal

Two dozen pair???!!! grin Barry you are a die-hard! wink I guess its terrain. Sticks found their way into my feet too often to continue chancing getting stabbed. Mosty juniper sticks. In the desert it was sharp rocks getting under my foot. I'm aware some sandals are much more enclosed than what I hike in (Nike Strap Runners at present) but there is a point that they become shoes and not sandals. I still keep them in/on my pack for spares or for wading.
Never wore socks with them.